Discussion:
Recommended Listening....
(too old to reply)
Craig C. Brandau
2003-08-26 05:17:12 UTC
Permalink
I¹d like to know what you guys and gals think one should absolutely listen
to as far a classical guitarist are concerned.....besides Segovia, that¹s a
given. I¹m a jazz player looking to expand my horizons.

TIA,
CCB
Edward Bridge
2003-08-26 13:31:00 UTC
Permalink
Recommended Listening....
"Craig C. Brandau" <***@earthlink.net> wrote in message news:BB703AB8.75C6%***@earthlink.net...
I'd like to know what you guys and gals think one should absolutely listen to as far a classical guitarist are concerned.....besides Segovia, that's a given. I'm a jazz player looking to expand my horizons.

TIA,
CCB

From the good work of Joshua Weage ! .
look above your post for the rest of the "good stuff"


A 1.7 What a good sample of classical guitar CD's that someone who
doesn't know much about them could listen to?

Some good selections are (in no particular order):

Manuel Barrueco plays Albeniz & Turina (EMI cdc 7 54382 2)
includes:
Albeniz: Suite Espanola, op.47
Turina: Fandanguillo, op.36
Sevilla (Fantasia), op.29
Rafaga, op.53
Homenaje a Tarrega, op.69
Sonata, op.61

Manuel Barrueco plays '300 Years of Guitar Masterpieces
(Vox Box CD3X 3007)
includes:
(1) Bach: Suite No. 4 in E Major
Bach: Suite No. 2 in A Minor
Albeniz: First Suite Espanola, op. 47
(2) Scarlatti: Sonatas
Cimarosa: Sonatas
Paganini: Sonata in A Major, op.3 no. 1
Giuliani: Variations sur les Folies d'Espagne, op. 45
Paganini: Sonata in E Minor, Op. 3 no. 6
Giuliani: Gran Sonata Eroica in A Major, Op. 150
Granados: Spanish Dances
(3) Granados: Spanish Dances (continued)
Villa-Lobos: Etudes for Guitar
Guarnieri: Estudo No. 1
Chavez: 3 pieces for Guitar
Villa-Lobos: Suite populaire bresilienne

Andres Segovia plays 'The Segovia Collection Volume 7: Guitar Etudes'
includes:
Aguado: Eight Lessons for Guitar (1-8)
Sor: Studies for the Guitar (10, 15, 19, 6, 3, 17, 5, 4)
Segovia: Study
Giuliani: Studies for the Guitar
Coste: Studies
Sor: Studies
Tarrega: Study in the form of a Minuet

John Williams (Sony SBK 48 168)
includes:
Rodrigo: Concierto de Aranjuez
Rodrigo: Fantasia para un gentilhombre
Giuliani: Concerto in A major, op.30
Vivaldi: Concerto in D major, RV 93

John Williams "Spirit of the Guitar- music of the Americas"
(CBS MK 44898)
includes works by:
Andrew York
Augustin Barrios Mangore
Astor Piazzolla
Manuel Ponce
Antonio Lauro
Leo Brower
Charlie Byrd
Heitor Villa-Lobos
Julio Sagreras
Gomez Crespo

Guitar Player presents Legends of the Guitar, Classical
[Rhino R2 70563]

1) Sonata, K.336- Domenico Scarlatti, David Tanenbaum (gtr.)
2) Allegro (from English Suite No.3)- J.S. Bach, Ida Presti &
Alexandre Lagoya (gtrs.)
3) Variations on the Russian Folk Song "Spinning Wheel"- Mikail
Visotsky, Alexander Ivanov-Kramskoy (gtr.)
4) Introduction and Variations on a Theme of Mozart, op.9-
Fernando Sor, Nigel North (gtr.)
5) Cappriccio No.5- Nicolo Paganini, Eliot Fisk (gtr.)
6) Danzas Espanolas, op.37 no.2 "Oriental", Pepe & Celin Romero (gtrs.)
7) Homenaje a Debussy- Manuel de Falla, Jose Rey de la Torre (gtr.)
8) Sueno en la Floresta- Agustin Barrios Mangore, John Williams (gtr.)
9) Etude no.7- Heitor Villa-Lobos, Eduardo Fernandez (gtr.)
10) Fandanguillo- Joaquin Turina, Andres Segovia (gtr.)
11) Cochichando- Alfredo Vianna (Pixinguinha), Sharon Isbin (gtr.)
12) El Polifemo de Oro- Reginald Smith-Brindle, Julian Bream (gtr.)
13) Brazilliance- Laurindo Almeida, The Falla Trio (gtrs.)
14) Micro Piezas- Leo Brouwer, Sergio & Adair Assad (gtrs.)
15) Gigue- Anthony Newman, Benjamin Verdery (gtr.)
16) Chase- Michael Starobin, David Starobin (gtr.)
17) Sunburst- Andrew York, Andrew York (gtr.)

"Guitar and Flute Duets" by Peter Draper.
Amsco Publications.
Some cool stuff. Bach, Mozart etc.
Lutester
2003-08-26 14:14:38 UTC
Permalink
On Tue, 26 Aug 2003 13:31:00 GMT, "Edward Bridge"
Post by Edward Bridge
Guitar Player presents Legends of the Guitar, Classical
[Rhino R2 70563]
1) Sonata, K.336- Domenico Scarlatti, David Tanenbaum (gtr.)
2) Allegro (from English Suite No.3)- J.S. Bach, Ida Presti &
Alexandre Lagoya (gtrs.)
3) Variations on the Russian Folk Song "Spinning Wheel"- Mikail
Visotsky, Alexander Ivanov-Kramskoy (gtr.)
4) Introduction and Variations on a Theme of Mozart, op.9-
Fernando Sor, Nigel North (gtr.)
5) Cappriccio No.5- Nicolo Paganini, Eliot Fisk (gtr.)
6) Danzas Espanolas, op.37 no.2 "Oriental", Pepe & Celin Romero (gtrs.)
7) Homenaje a Debussy- Manuel de Falla, Jose Rey de la Torre (gtr.)
8) Sueno en la Floresta- Agustin Barrios Mangore, John Williams (gtr.)
9) Etude no.7- Heitor Villa-Lobos, Eduardo Fernandez (gtr.)
10) Fandanguillo- Joaquin Turina, Andres Segovia (gtr.)
11) Cochichando- Alfredo Vianna (Pixinguinha), Sharon Isbin (gtr.)
12) El Polifemo de Oro- Reginald Smith-Brindle, Julian Bream (gtr.)
13) Brazilliance- Laurindo Almeida, The Falla Trio (gtrs.)
14) Micro Piezas- Leo Brouwer, Sergio & Adair Assad (gtrs.)
15) Gigue- Anthony Newman, Benjamin Verdery (gtr.)
16) Chase- Michael Starobin, David Starobin (gtr.)
17) Sunburst- Andrew York, Andrew York (gtr.)
Great looking record...excuse me.....CD. Where might one get this?
I've already gone to Amazon.com with no luck.

Robert
Tim Smith
2003-08-26 15:23:43 UTC
Permalink
Guitar Player presents Legends of the Guitar, Classical [Rhino R2 70563]
...
Great looking record...excuse me.....CD. Where might one get this? I've
already gone to Amazon.com with no luck.
This place lists it for sale:

http://www.elderly.com/recordings/54.htm

NOTE: I found that via Google, so can't say whether they are a good and safe
place or not when it comes to online purchasing.
--
Evidence Eliminator is worthless: www.evidence-eliminator-sucks.com
--Tim Smith
elmcmeen
2003-08-26 15:48:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tim Smith
Post by Lutester
Guitar Player presents Legends of the Guitar, Classical [Rhino R2 70563]
...
Post by Lutester
Great looking record...excuse me.....CD. Where might one get this?
I've
Post by Tim Smith
Post by Lutester
already gone to Amazon.com with no luck.
http://www.elderly.com/recordings/54.htm
NOTE: I found that via Google, so can't say whether they are a good and safe
place or not when it comes to online purchasing.
Elderly is great. They sell my CD's but that's not the (only) reason I like
them; I've bought much stuff there.

EM
Doug Cummings
2003-08-26 17:37:09 UTC
Permalink
Robert,

Try Rhino records. Here is the URL for the CD.

http://www.rhino.com/store/ProductDetail.lasso?Number=70563

I have also seen it in the rack at my local Borders Books store.

Regards,
Doug Cummings
Post by Lutester
On Tue, 26 Aug 2003 13:31:00 GMT, "Edward Bridge"
Post by Edward Bridge
Guitar Player presents Legends of the Guitar, Classical
[Rhino R2 70563]
<< Snip the track list >>
Post by Lutester
Great looking record...excuse me.....CD. Where might one get this?
I've already gone to Amazon.com with no luck.
Robert
Lutester
2003-08-26 19:13:49 UTC
Permalink
Thanks, it's on the way now.

Robert
Post by Doug Cummings
Robert,
Try Rhino records. Here is the URL for the CD.
http://www.rhino.com/store/ProductDetail.lasso?Number=70563
I have also seen it in the rack at my local Borders Books store.
Regards,
Doug Cummings
Post by Lutester
On Tue, 26 Aug 2003 13:31:00 GMT, "Edward Bridge"
Post by Edward Bridge
Guitar Player presents Legends of the Guitar, Classical
[Rhino R2 70563]
<< Snip the track list >>
Post by Lutester
Great looking record...excuse me.....CD. Where might one get this?
I've already gone to Amazon.com with no luck.
Robert
Todd Tipton
2003-08-26 15:41:10 UTC
Permalink
I’d like to know what you guys and gals think one should
absolutely listen to as far a classical guitarist are
concerned.....besides Segovia, that’s a given. I’m a jazz
player looking to expand my horizons.
Hello Craig,

I must admit that it is becoming more common for me to run
across recitals and recordings of guitarists I have never
heard of; I simply can't keep up. One can imagine that this
"losing touch" is multiplied concerning -other-
instruments. Often, I am influenced by the -composer-
rather than the performer.

For example, I know that a pianist by the name of Richard
Goode is coming to Cincinnati next month to perform with the
CSO. I have never heard of Richard Goode, so that
information in itself would not be enough to automatically
spark my interest. Yet I know that he is coming to town to
perform Bartok's Piano Concerto No. 3. For better or worse,
I have never heard this piece. However, I am fond of the
first two concertos and am fond of Bartok in general. Under
those conditions, I am excited to hear a concerto that I
will probably be interested in and is "new" to me.

In the guitar world, Brouwer's Sonata comes to mind to cite
an example. This is one of my favorite works by Brouwer and
I wish it was performed more often. I had two recordings of
this work: one by Julian Bream and another by Ignacio
Rodes. The Rodes recording was the first one that I bought
and my love of the music grew with each listen. However, I
discovered this piece for myself from the Rodes recording,
yet I bought the Rodes recording for an entirely different
reason. So by accident, I discovered another piece that I
am fond of.

When I purchased the Bream recording of the Brouwer Sonata,
I felt that I was listening to the piece from a very
different perspective than the rendition I had first heard
an became familiar with. It is not necessarily that one
rendition is better than the other, but they -are-
different. To try to simplify it in one sentence, I feel
that Bream brought a heightened level of importance to some
of the background elements of the piece, whereas Rodes
offered something a bit more straight forward. With or
without intention, my listening to these renditions must
surely influence my -own- interpretation of the work.

Recently, I bought a third recording of this Brouwer piece,
performed by Graham Anthony Devine. I must admit that I had
never -heard of this performer. It was solely my interest
in Brouwer, and the Sonata particularly, that made me
purchase this CD. By purchasing the CD, I also heard
Brouwer's Suite No. 2 that I had never heard before.
Honestly, I am not yet familiar with it but it did made a
great first impression.

You mention that you are familiar with Segovia. I might
suggest that you consider some of the pieces you are most
fond of. Also consider the composers in general. Use this
as a start to branch out. Seek out performers who play the
pieces that you are fond of. Seek out performers who play
works you are not familiar with, but are by composers you
like in general. Like a domino effect, you will then be
exposed to other music. Some of it you will like, some of
it you may not. Avoid what you don't care for, but expand
on what interest you. We all have to start somewhere. In
my opinion, such an approach will give one more than enough
momentum and will be more enjoyable. Take the same approach
when attending concerts and recitals.

For me that start was a very long time ago. I was an
uncultured kid who was not brought up in the arts. As a
mostly self tought player, I grew tired of the heavy metal I
was raised on. Yet my roots must have dictated how I was to
branch out. A young punk familiar with Metallica and
Stormtroopers of Death could not have instantly appreciated
a Palestrina Mass. Stravinsky is another story though.
Because of my listening tastes, coupled with a desire to
branch out myself, I naturally became interested in more
progressive rock. My world changed when I first heard Al Di
Meola's "Race With Devil on Spanish Highway." Had it not
been for that, I probably would have not been interested in
his other recordings that sparked my interests even
-further.-

Considering my background, this was new territory and I
sought out more. It may be easy to see how ELP could have
sparked my interest in Copeland or Holst. It wouldn't take
much imagination to see how taking an interest in the Pat
Metheny Group led me seek out everything from "pure" jazz
to the works of Steve Reich. From Reich came Glass, Terry
Riley, and even John Adams. In the classical guitar, some
of the Villa Lobos etudes and preludes was something I
instantly related to. Villa Lobos was one of the first
composers who had written for the guitar that I embraced.
Of course I am over simplifying this journey (that I am
still on) but it has almost always come from an interest in
seeking out more of something I already enjoyed.

At this point in my life, I enjoy listening to everything
from the most contemporary works, back to Medieval music and
everything in between. I certainly didn't gain that
interest and appreciation over night. It took time. For
me, the more CD's and performances I am exposed to, the more
I want. It is a domino effect that I can not stop nor wish
to stop. The particulars may be a bit fuzzy now, but it all
started in a logical prgression of where I was standing at
the beginning of it all.

Todd Tipton
Cincinnati, Oh.
http://toddtipton.com
Peter Inglis - TWG
2003-08-26 18:34:08 UTC
Permalink
<snip> Yet I know that he is coming to town to perform Bartok's Piano Concerto No. 3. For better or worse, I have never heard this piece. However, I am fond of the first two concertos and am fond of Bartok in general.<snip>

It's much much more accessible than the 1st two - a wonderful piece to see performed.
--
Regards

Peter Inglis - email - ***@migman.com
"The Whole Guitarist" - www.migman.com/twg
Technique - What is technique and how do I get it?
Doug Cummings
2003-08-27 02:30:33 UTC
Permalink
Todd,
Here is a new twist on your musical journey melding your metal past
with early music. Give it a listen. I think you find it amusing if not
down right interesting.

Black Sabbath songs covered by medieval music band Rondellus
http://www.sabbatum.com/

Regards,
Doug Cummings
Post by Todd Tipton
I?d like to know what you guys and gals think one should
absolutely listen to as far a classical guitarist are
concerned.....besides Segovia, that?s a given. I?m a jazz
player looking to expand my horizons.
Hello Craig,
I must admit that it is becoming more common for me to run
across recitals and recordings of guitarists I have never
heard of; I simply can't keep up. One can imagine that this
"losing touch" is multiplied concerning -other-
instruments. Often, I am influenced by the -composer-
rather than the performer.
<<Snip>>
For me that start was a very long time ago. I was an
uncultured kid who was not brought up in the arts. As a
mostly self tought player, I grew tired of the heavy metal I
was raised on. Yet my roots must have dictated how I was to
branch out. A young punk familiar with Metallica and
Stormtroopers of Death could not have instantly appreciated
a Palestrina Mass. <<snip>
Todd Tipton
Cincinnati, Oh.
http://toddtipton.com
--
Todd Tipton
2003-08-27 03:23:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by Doug Cummings
Todd,
Here is a new twist on your musical journey melding your metal past
with early music. Give it a listen. I think you find it amusing if not
down right interesting.
Black Sabbath songs covered by medieval music band Rondellus
http://www.sabbatum.com/
I have heard snippets of it before. At first I had a good laugh, but then I was compelled to
hear more. :-) Thanks for the tip. Along those same lines, what was the Cello Quartet the
recorded a CD full of Metallica tunes? :-)

Todd Tipton
Cincinnati, Oh.
http://toddtipton.com
Tim Smith
2003-08-27 04:48:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by Doug Cummings
Here is a new twist on your musical journey melding your metal past
with early music. Give it a listen. I think you find it amusing if not
down right interesting.
Black Sabbath songs covered by medieval music band Rondellus
http://www.sabbatum.com/
No "Iron Man"? No "Paranoid"? WTF?
--
Evidence Eliminator is worthless: www.evidence-eliminator-sucks.com
--Tim Smith
Todd Tipton
2003-08-27 03:29:15 UTC
Permalink
- Victor Villadangos' "Guitar Music of Argentina" (I particularly like
Maximo Diego Pujol's "Suite del Plata, No. 1", published by Editions
Orphee <http://www.orphee.com/solos/plata.html>)
Not only is this a good piece of music, but it is relatively easy to play as well! Even for advanced players, such a piece can provide
the perfect foil and relief to an audience of a demanding program.

Todd Tipton
Cincinnati, Oh.
http://toddtipton.com
s***@hotmail.com
2003-08-27 04:26:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Inglis - TWG
<snip>
Post by Todd Tipton
In the guitar world, Brouwer's Sonata comes to mind to cite
an example. This is one of my favorite works by Brouwer and
I wish it was performed more often.
<snip>
Post by Todd Tipton
Recently, I bought a third recording of this Brouwer piece,
performed by Graham Anthony Devine. I must admit that I had
never -heard of this performer. It was solely my interest
in Brouwer, and the Sonata particularly, that made me
purchase this CD. By purchasing the CD, I also heard
Brouwer's Suite No. 2 that I had never heard before.
Honestly, I am not yet familiar with it but it did made a
great first impression.
Todd's comments prompt me to make further comments.
1) The Graham Anthony Devine disc is wonderful. In addition to the
Sonata and the Suite No.2, it also contains some other fine Brouwer
compositions, including "An Idea" and "Un dia de Noviembre".
Martin
I was a bit disappointed with Devine's performance of the Sonata, he
simply takes everything at tempos too fast to absorb the beauty of
Brouwer's harmonies and rhythmic textures. Don't get me wrong, GAD has
one of the most amazing techniques I've ever heard, so precise and both
hands so very strong. Interpretively I've never heard anybody follow
every direction in the score so exactly, especially the lower dynamic
levels, he can summon a great deal of gradation in volume from his
instrument. While the first two movements of the Sonata are quite good,
the last is taken so fast you lose the rhythmic dance groove element
that Brouwer built into the movement. The virtuosity takes over the
music and you don't find yourself immersed in the piece, rather
listening to someone else finding finger ecstasy in it. For a much
better performance of the Sonata overall I highly recommend Ricardo
Gallen's recital disc which is also a NAXOS disc.

The Suite # 2 is a better performancethan the Sonata - this is an early
Brouwer work that sounds like Tedesco or Ponce, the last movement
especially GAD plays with a lovely mellow tone. The only other complete
recording of the Suite I've heard is Gerald Garcia's , it too is on a
NAXOS disc and GAD is the superior performance. However the first
movement - the lovely Preludio is played most beautifully by Manuel
Barrueco on his Cuba! CD on EMI which also includes another piece
included on GAD's disc, the Rito de los Orishas. I find this piece
interpretively very difficult and while GAD does an impressive job
Barrueco really knows the ins and outs of conveying Brouwer's soundworld
a whole lot better.

The Idea (Passacaglia for Eli Kassner) is really a gorgeous piece, and
GAD milks it for all it worth. Too bad the idea doesn't last long.

By far the best performance on the CD is the "Pasaje Cubanos con
campanas" (Cuban landscape with bells) First of all, this is a
masterpiece of the first order and though it includes every known
Brouwerism and effect in it , the more you listen to it the more you
just can't help thinking what an inspired creative mind this man has.
GAD plays every hammer-on and pull-off/harmonics so well you'd think he
was playing Van Halen's old Hamer.

Oh yes, another great performance is of the piece "Hika" which is in the
memory of the great composer Toru Takemitsu. Here GAD's overpowering
technique works to great effect. The piece has a wide range of moods
from the contemplative to the powerful and it's really riveting. I enjoy
GAD's performance better than Williams on Sony Classical or Shin-Ichi
Fukuda's (world premier recording). The piece includes a quote and
reworking of one of the Tres Apuntes (which is also Brouwer study #8)



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