Discussion:
How did you know when to quit lessons?
(too old to reply)
Tommy Grand
2010-01-27 02:55:06 UTC
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This is directed at those of you who didn't attend music school. How
did you know when you were ready to stop taking lessons? I don't mean
why did you quit a particular teacher, but rather how you came to the
conclusion that further formal instruction wasn't necessary for your
development as a player.
edspyhill01
2010-01-27 03:39:38 UTC
Permalink
This is directed at those of you who didn't attend music school.  How
did you know when you were ready to stop taking lessons?  I don't mean
why did you quit a particular teacher, but rather how you came to the
conclusion that further formal instruction wasn't necessary for your
development as a player.
The teacher wants to shoot the bull more than teach;
the teacher is exhausted all the time and his eyes close
involuntarily;
you realize the teacher has no curriculum for your level ("time to
revisit <insert stuff from 2 years ago here>");
you are interested in repertoire your teacher has never heard of;
you can play repertoire your teacher never heard of;
all past students seemed to have quit around "this time";
some students go on to music school and don't have the chops to make
it;
your gut has been telling you to move on for 6 months but you feel
obliged to continue.

I have more but I can't remember them right now.
Tommy Grand
2010-01-27 04:04:33 UTC
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Post by edspyhill01
This is directed at those of you who didn't attend music school.  How
did you know when you were ready to stop taking lessons?  I don't mean
why did you quit a particular teacher, but rather how you came to the
conclusion that further formal instruction wasn't necessary for your
development as a player.
The teacher wants to shoot the bull more than teach;
the teacher is exhausted all the time and his eyes close
involuntarily;
you realize the teacher has no curriculum for your level ("time to
revisit <insert stuff from 2 years ago here>");
you are interested in repertoire your teacher has never heard of;
you can play repertoire your teacher never heard of;
all past students seemed to have quit around "this time";
some students go on to music school and don't have the chops to make
it;
your gut has been telling you to move on for 6 months but you feel
obliged to continue.
I have more but I can't remember them right now.
Ed, I'm not asking how you know it's time to quit taking lessons from
a particular teacher, but rather how you know it's time to quit
lessons period.
doug
2010-01-27 03:42:27 UTC
Permalink
This is directed at those of you who didn't attend music school.  How
did you know when you were ready to stop taking lessons?  I don't mean
why did you quit a particular teacher, but rather how you came to the
conclusion that further formal instruction wasn't necessary for your
development as a player.
Do you ever know everything there is to know about the guitar. I
would guess that even concert guitarists still learn from each other.
they may not actually take lessons but can still learn from others. I
suppose a virtuoso wouldn't find it necessary to actually take lessons
but below that level lessons would be helpful, especially with
interpretation Also I think you can only learn so much from any one
teacher. I know when I studied clarinet my first teacher moved me to
another teacher when I reached the level where he couldn't help me
anymore.
Having said that I quit taking lessons when I reached the level I
wanted for my personal enjoyment. But I played other instruments
prior to the guitar so I had a good background in music and only
wanted to learn how to play the guitar not to excel at it.
Tommy Grand
2010-01-27 04:05:28 UTC
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Post by doug
Having said that I quit taking lessons when I reached the level I
wanted for my personal enjoyment.  But I played other instruments
prior to the guitar so I had a good background in music and only
wanted to learn how to play the guitar not to excel at it.
Thanks Doug, don't let anyone say you never post about guitar! I
think I may continue taking lessons for the rest of my life, but I
gather this is quite uncommon. Wondering why.
Slogoin
2010-01-27 04:36:26 UTC
Permalink
Thanks Doug, don't let anyone say you never post about guitar!  I
think I may continue taking lessons for the rest of my life, but I
gather this is quite uncommon.  Wondering why.
Didn't you say you played cello?
Tommy Grand
2010-01-27 05:00:59 UTC
Permalink
   Didn't you say you played cello?
I played trombone, which is not unlike the cello. The reason I quit
trombone lessons, was I got a girlfriend (mostly).
doug
2010-01-27 07:10:52 UTC
Permalink
Thanks Doug, don't let anyone say you never post about guitar!  I
think I may continue taking lessons for the rest of my life, but I
gather this is quite uncommon.  Wondering why.
   Didn't you say you played cello?
I wish
Slogoin
2010-01-27 04:34:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by doug
Having said that I quit taking lessons when I reached the level I
wanted for my personal enjoyment.  But I played other instruments
prior to the guitar so I had a good background in music and only
wanted to learn how to play the guitar not to excel at it.
So, Doug, do you play guitar? I thought you only pretended to play
guitar, and didn't even do that very well.
Slogoin
2010-01-27 04:28:38 UTC
Permalink
This is directed at those of you who didn't attend music school.  How
did you know when you were ready to stop taking lessons?  I don't mean
why did you quit a particular teacher, but rather how you came to the
conclusion that further formal instruction wasn't necessary for your
development as a player.
How is the question different for someone who went to music school?
Tommy Grand
2010-01-27 04:58:17 UTC
Permalink
  How is the question different for someone who went to music school?
In music school the lessons naturally end when you graduate, unless
you make special effort to continue them. Quitting private lessons
requires a deliberate change in your routine.

How did you decide you didn't need/want a regular guitar teacher
anymore?
Tommy Grand
2010-01-27 17:57:32 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tommy Grand
  How is the question different for someone who went to music school?
In music school the lessons naturally end when you graduate, unless
you make special effort to continue them.  Quitting private lessons
requires a deliberate change in your routine.
How did you decide you didn't need/want a regular guitar teacher
anymore?
Larry do you have an answer?
Slogoin
2010-01-27 18:32:15 UTC
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Post by Tommy Grand
Larry do you have an answer?
TG, can you NOT troll?
Tommy Grand
2010-01-27 18:34:04 UTC
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Post by Tommy Grand
Larry do you have an answer?
   TG, can you NOT troll?
I was being sincere. How did you know that you had "graduated" from
lessons, so to speak?
John E. Golden
2010-01-27 22:40:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tommy Grand
This is directed at those of you who didn't attend music school. How
did you know when you were ready to stop taking lessons? I don't mean
why did you quit a particular teacher, but rather how you came to the
conclusion that further formal instruction wasn't necessary for your
development as a player.


Regards,
John E. Golden
Dicerous
2010-01-28 06:05:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by John E. Golden
This is directed at those of you who didn't attend music school.  How
did you know when you were ready to stop taking lessons?  I don't mean
why did you quit a particular teacher, but rather how you came to the
conclusion that further formal instruction wasn't necessary for your
development as a player.
http://youtu.be/IQQOjlgviCI
Regards,
John E. Golden
Tommy,

Let alone finding a teacher that can keep up with you, I feel that if
you arrive at a point where you are discussing the *engineering* of
the composition qua composer you have arrived (i.e rather than being a
little gearhead like you are now). Having knowledge of something and
being able to extemporize with your teacher about those things, the
subtleties of interpretation, the quality of the performance viz your
own myopia; and when you feel you can play basically anything your
teacher puts in front of you, then you don't really need him or her
any more.


The real nasty teachers will keep telling you how you need to adjust
technique in some kind of perfection-fantasy (of theirs); quickly run
away from those people, they can not think positively and move you
forward.
Tommy Grand
2010-01-28 14:26:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dicerous
Let alone finding a teacher that can keep up with you, I feel that if
you arrive at a point where you are discussing the *engineering* of
the composition qua composer you have arrived (i.e rather than being a
little gearhead like you are now).  Having knowledge of something and
being able to extemporize with your teacher about those things, the
subtleties of interpretation, the quality of the performance viz your
own myopia; and when you feel you can play basically anything your
teacher puts in front of you, then you don't really need him or her
any more.
Thanks for the feedback, David. I doubt I'll ever get to the point
where I could play anything my teacher puts in front of me. After
all, he plays some of the most demanding virtuoso showpieces in the
repertoire. Yes, it appears lessons for life is my destiny. I fear
this is weak or silly, hmm.
Post by Dicerous
The real nasty teachers will keep telling you how you need to adjust technique in some kind of perfection-fantasy (of theirs);  quickly > run away from those people, they can not think positively and move you forward.
Fortunately my teacher is ultra non-dogmatic, and will teach me
whatever I want to learn unless it is total bullshit (he turns me down
about 5%-10% of the time). My current arpeggio project is my own
idea, and I'm sure my teacher thinks it's a bit pointless and
masochistic. Luckily for me, however, he knows exactly what must be
done to achieve these mechanical goals. Some of it is very strange,
almost paradoxical, such as playing with a lot of tension on
purpose...but I'm not at liberty to go into many details.
edspyhill01
2010-01-28 15:08:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dicerous
Let alone finding a teacher that can keep up with you, I feel that if
you arrive at a point where you are discussing the *engineering* of
the composition qua composer you have arrived (i.e rather than being a
little gearhead like you are now).  Having knowledge of something and
being able to extemporize with your teacher about those things, the
subtleties of interpretation, the quality of the performance viz your
own myopia; and when you feel you can play basically anything your
teacher puts in front of you, then you don't really need him or her
any more.
Thanks for the feedback, David.  I doubt I'll ever get to the point
where I could play anything my teacher puts in front of me.  After
all, he plays some of the most demanding virtuoso showpieces in the
repertoire.  Yes, it appears lessons for life is my destiny.  I fear
this is weak or silly, hmm.
Post by Dicerous
The real nasty teachers will keep telling you how you need to adjust technique in some kind of perfection-fantasy (of theirs);  quickly > run away from those people, they can not think positively and move you forward.
Fortunately my teacher is ultra non-dogmatic, and will teach me
whatever I want to learn unless it is total bullshit (he turns me down
about 5%-10% of the time).  My current arpeggio project is my own
idea, and I'm sure my teacher thinks it's a bit pointless and
masochistic.  Luckily for me, however, he knows exactly what must be
done to achieve these mechanical goals.  Some of it is very strange,
almost paradoxical, such as playing with a lot of tension on
purpose...but I'm not at liberty to go into many details.
What strategies has your teacher given you to facilitate fast and
accurate finger shifts when changing chords?
Tommy Grand
2010-01-28 15:19:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by edspyhill01
What strategies has your teacher given you to facilitate fast and
accurate finger shifts when changing chords?
This is a very suttle, and complex problem, and usually must be solved
case by case! However I have not really practised this much, as my
Pujol #3, Pisador Villanesca, and Sor #1 videos will demonstrate. It's
on my list.

How about you?