Discussion:
right index finger problem
(too old to reply)
y***@att.com
2009-05-01 14:24:33 UTC
Permalink
Hello to all!. I play classical guitar for many years and wonder if
anybody has similar problem ... In the last several years I noticed
that my index finger of right hand slowly is loosing it's mobility and
speed. At this point I can play much faster with m-a combination
rather than i-m or i-a. It's really very upsetting - I have to relearn
many pieces. If I try to play a lot of exercises for i-m combination I
start experiencing almost a pain in the place where index finger
connects to the hand ...
Couple of years ago I went to a hand surgeon, but he really didn't
find any problems (he thinks that maybe it's arthritis originating in
the neck).
Very frustrating ... Any ideas or suggestions?
Regards,
Yuri
t***@lycos.com
2009-05-01 14:29:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by y***@att.com
Hello to all!. I play classical guitar for many years and wonder if
anybody has similar problem ... In the last several years I noticed
that my index finger of right hand slowly is loosing it's mobility and
speed. At this point I can play much faster with m-a combination
rather than i-m or i-a. It's really very upsetting - I have to relearn
many pieces. If I try to play a lot of exercises for i-m combination I
start experiencing almost a pain in the place where index finger
connects to the hand ...
Couple of years ago I went to a hand surgeon, but he really didn't
find any problems (he thinks that maybe it's arthritis originating in
the neck).
Very frustrating ... Any ideas or suggestions?
Regards,
  Yuri
Maybe it's Allzimers. Maybe you have to relearn everything because you
are losing your memory.

Troy Donaghue III
arys
2009-05-01 14:36:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by y***@att.com
Hello to all!. I play classical guitar for many years and wonder if
anybody has similar problem ... In the last several years I noticed
that my index finger of right hand slowly is loosing it's mobility and
speed. At this point I can play much faster with m-a combination
rather than i-m or i-a. It's really very upsetting - I have to relearn
many pieces. If I try to play a lot of exercises for i-m combination I
start experiencing almost a pain in the place where index finger
connects to the hand ...
Couple of years ago I went to a hand surgeon, but he really didn't
find any problems (he thinks that maybe it's arthritis originating in
the neck).
Very frustrating ... Any ideas or suggestions?
Regards,
  Yuri
Try practicing index finger -heavy rasgueado patterns.

-MK
arys
2009-05-01 15:30:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by arys
Post by y***@att.com
Hello to all!. I play classical guitar for many years and wonder if
anybody has similar problem ... In the last several years I noticed
that my index finger of right hand slowly is loosing it's mobility and
speed. At this point I can play much faster with m-a combination
rather than i-m or i-a. It's really very upsetting - I have to relearn
many pieces. If I try to play a lot of exercises for i-m combination I
start experiencing almost a pain in the place where index finger
connects to the hand ...
Couple of years ago I went to a hand surgeon, but he really didn't
find any problems (he thinks that maybe it's arthritis originating in
the neck).
Very frustrating ... Any ideas or suggestions?
Regards,
  Yuri
Try practicing index finger -heavy rasgueado patterns.
-MK
With the rationale that maybe that would loosen it up.

-MK
y***@att.com
2009-05-01 15:53:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by arys
Post by arys
Post by y***@att.com
Hello to all!. I play classical guitar for many years and wonder if
anybody has similar problem ... In the last several years I noticed
that my index finger of right hand slowly is loosing it's mobility and
speed. At this point I can play much faster with m-a combination
rather than i-m or i-a. It's really very upsetting - I have to relearn
many pieces. If I try to play a lot of exercises for i-m combination I
start experiencing almost a pain in the place where index finger
connects to the hand ...
Couple of years ago I went to a hand surgeon, but he really didn't
find any problems (he thinks that maybe it's arthritis originating in
the neck).
Very frustrating ... Any ideas or suggestions?
Regards,
  Yuri
Try practicing index finger -heavy rasgueado patterns.
-MK
With the rationale that maybe that would loosen it up.
-MK
Very funny Troy - it's a serious problem for me ... Practicing just
makes it worse ...
t***@lycos.com
2009-05-01 21:56:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by y***@att.com
Post by arys
Post by arys
Post by y***@att.com
Hello to all!. I play classical guitar for many years and wonder if
anybody has similar problem ... In the last several years I noticed
that my index finger of right hand slowly is loosing it's mobility and
speed. At this point I can play much faster with m-a combination
rather than i-m or i-a. It's really very upsetting - I have to relearn
many pieces. If I try to play a lot of exercises for i-m combination I
start experiencing almost a pain in the place where index finger
connects to the hand ...
Couple of years ago I went to a hand surgeon, but he really didn't
find any problems (he thinks that maybe it's arthritis originating in
the neck).
Very frustrating ... Any ideas or suggestions?
Regards,
  Yuri
Try practicing index finger -heavy rasgueado patterns.
-MK
With the rationale that maybe that would loosen it up.
-MK
Very funny Troy - it's a serious problem for me ... Practicing just
makes it worse ...- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
Are you saying that Alzimers is not a serious problem. If practicing
is giving you pain, congratulations! That means it's working. No pain
no gain!

Troy Donaghue III
socrates
2009-05-01 16:02:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by y***@att.com
Hello to all!. I play classical guitar for many years and wonder if
anybody has similar problem ... In the last several years I noticed
that my index finger of right hand slowly is loosing it's mobility and
speed. At this point I can play much faster with m-a combination
rather than i-m or i-a. It's really very upsetting - I have to relearn
many pieces. If I try to play a lot of exercises for i-m combination I
start experiencing almost a pain in the place where index finger
connects to the hand ...
Couple of years ago I went to a hand surgeon, but he really didn't
find any problems (he thinks that maybe it's arthritis originating in
the neck).
Very frustrating ... Any ideas or suggestions?
Regards,
  Yuri
I would quit for awhile if you can. Don't do index finger -heavy
rasgueado patterns (sorry arys). It's quite possibly just stressed
out. Give it a month and approach again with the least amount of
tension.
y***@att.com
2009-05-01 17:16:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by y***@att.com
Hello to all!. I play classical guitar for many years and wonder if
anybody has similar problem ... In the last several years I noticed
that my index finger of right hand slowly is loosing it's mobility and
speed. At this point I can play much faster with m-a combination
rather than i-m or i-a. It's really very upsetting - I have to relearn
many pieces. If I try to play a lot of exercises for i-m combination I
start experiencing almost a pain in the place where index finger
connects to the hand ...
Couple of years ago I went to a hand surgeon, but he really didn't
find any problems (he thinks that maybe it's arthritis originating in
the neck).
Very frustrating ... Any ideas or suggestions?
Regards,
  Yuri
I would quit for awhile if you can.  Don't do index finger -heavy
rasgueado patterns (sorry arys).  It's quite possibly just stressed
out.  Give it a month and approach again with the least amount of
tension.
This approach didn't work. Had 3 weeks vacation and it was pretty
difficult to get back in "playing" shape. Problem didn't go away.
d***@gmail.com
2009-05-01 17:25:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by y***@att.com
Post by y***@att.com
Hello to all!. I play classical guitar for many years and wonder if
anybody has similar problem ... In the last several years I noticed
that my index finger of right hand slowly is loosing it's mobility and
speed. At this point I can play much faster with m-a combination
rather than i-m or i-a. It's really very upsetting - I have to relearn
many pieces. If I try to play a lot of exercises for i-m combination I
start experiencing almost a pain in the place where index finger
connects to the hand ...
Couple of years ago I went to a hand surgeon, but he really didn't
find any problems (he thinks that maybe it's arthritis originating in
the neck).
Very frustrating ... Any ideas or suggestions?
Regards,
  Yuri
I would quit for awhile if you can.  Don't do index finger -heavy
rasgueado patterns (sorry arys).  It's quite possibly just stressed
out.  Give it a month and approach again with the least amount of
tension.
This approach didn't work. Had 3 weeks vacation and it was pretty
difficult to get back in "playing" shape. Problem didn't go away.
I just have to ask, have you had a Swine Flu vaccination recently?
Tashi
catpandaddy
2009-05-01 18:36:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by y***@att.com
Hello to all!. I play classical guitar for many years and wonder if
anybody has similar problem ... In the last several years I noticed
that my index finger of right hand slowly is loosing it's mobility and
speed. At this point I can play much faster with m-a combination
rather than i-m or i-a. It's really very upsetting - I have to relearn
many pieces. If I try to play a lot of exercises for i-m combination I
start experiencing almost a pain in the place where index finger
connects to the hand ...
Couple of years ago I went to a hand surgeon, but he really didn't
find any problems (he thinks that maybe it's arthritis originating in
the neck).
Very frustrating ... Any ideas or suggestions?
Regards,
Yuri
I would quit for awhile if you can. Don't do index finger -heavy
rasgueado patterns (sorry arys). It's quite possibly just stressed
out. Give it a month and approach again with the least amount of
tension.
This approach didn't work. Had 3 weeks vacation and it was pretty
difficult to get back in "playing" shape. Problem didn't go away.
I wish I had more to add, but after taking that much time off, especially
with the existing problem, you need to rehab your practice by forcing
yourself to play slow and precise and deliberate. I discovered the same
thing with my typing. I got worse and worse until I got my ego under
control enough to force myself to forget everything except slow precision
with lots of breaks inbetween to avoid overstressing and to allow muscle
memory to do its work, which a surprising amount of happens during resting
periods.
Lutemann
2009-05-01 18:29:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by y***@att.com
Hello to all!. I play classical guitar for many years and wonder if
anybody has similar problem ... In the last several years I noticed
that my index finger of right hand slowly is loosing it's mobility and
speed. At this point I can play much faster with m-a combination
rather than i-m or i-a. It's really very upsetting - I have to relearn
many pieces. If I try to play a lot of exercises for i-m combination I
start experiencing almost a pain in the place where index finger
connects to the hand ...
Couple of years ago I went to a hand surgeon, but he really didn't
find any problems (he thinks that maybe it's arthritis originating in
the neck).
Very frustrating ... Any ideas or suggestions?
Regards,
Yuri
I can't tell what you are doing unless I see it. The most common
causes of right hand problems is a lack of coordintation of joints-
joints flex together and release together- and not using natural
release. Having said that, it could be anything. Put something up on
youtube and we'll all take a look.
y***@att.com
2009-05-03 01:06:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by y***@att.com
Hello to all!. I play classical guitar for many years and wonder if
anybody has similar problem ... In the last several years I noticed
that my index finger of right hand slowly is loosing it's mobility and
speed. At this point I can play much faster with m-a combination
rather than i-m or i-a. It's really very upsetting - I have to relearn
many pieces. If I try to play a lot of exercises for i-m combination I
start experiencing almost a pain in the place where index finger
connects to the hand ...
Couple of years ago I went to a hand surgeon, but he really didn't
find any problems (he thinks that maybe it's arthritis originating in
the neck).
Very frustrating ... Any ideas or suggestions?
Regards,
� Yuri
I can't tell what you are doing unless I see it. �The most common
causes of right hand problems is a lack of coordintation of joints-
joints flex together and release together- �and not using �natural
release. Having said that, it could be anything. �Put something up on
youtube and we'll all take a look.
Thanks to all for the advices ... I don't think I'm doing anything
wrong ... I play guitar for 40 years, some of it professionally. I
studied in Academy of Music in Jerusalem, so I think my technique is
pretty solid. It's really difficult to explain this condition. The
index finger just lost it's velocity... When I try to play more
exercises with i-m fingers I develop light pain right between the
knuckles of i and m finger. Taking a break for several weeks didn't
help, on the opposite it took very long time to get back to where I
left off. I'd be happy to find a doctor specializing in hand/finger
problems. I live not far from NYC - anybody can recomend a doctor? BTW
I talked long time ago about this problem with Matanya Ophee and he
suggested to move guitar to the right knee and play similar to
flamenco style. I think he had similar problem at one time. Looks like
it helped him, but didn't do anything for me ... I'll definitely look
at dystonia on the Web ..
Regards,
Yuri
Steven Bornfeld
2009-05-03 01:36:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by y***@att.com
Post by y***@att.com
Hello to all!. I play classical guitar for many years and wonder if
anybody has similar problem ... In the last several years I noticed
that my index finger of right hand slowly is loosing it's mobility and
speed. At this point I can play much faster with m-a combination
rather than i-m or i-a. It's really very upsetting - I have to relearn
many pieces. If I try to play a lot of exercises for i-m combination I
start experiencing almost a pain in the place where index finger
connects to the hand ...
Couple of years ago I went to a hand surgeon, but he really didn't
find any problems (he thinks that maybe it's arthritis originating in
the neck).
Very frustrating ... Any ideas or suggestions?
Regards,
� Yuri
I can't tell what you are doing unless I see it. �The most common
causes of right hand problems is a lack of coordintation of joints-
joints flex together and release together- �and not using �natural
release. Having said that, it could be anything. �Put something up on
youtube and we'll all take a look.
Thanks to all for the advices ... I don't think I'm doing anything
wrong ... I play guitar for 40 years, some of it professionally. I
studied in Academy of Music in Jerusalem, so I think my technique is
pretty solid. It's really difficult to explain this condition. The
index finger just lost it's velocity... When I try to play more
exercises with i-m fingers I develop light pain right between the
knuckles of i and m finger. Taking a break for several weeks didn't
help, on the opposite it took very long time to get back to where I
left off. I'd be happy to find a doctor specializing in hand/finger
problems. I live not far from NYC - anybody can recomend a doctor? BTW
I talked long time ago about this problem with Matanya Ophee and he
suggested to move guitar to the right knee and play similar to
flamenco style. I think he had similar problem at one time. Looks like
it helped him, but didn't do anything for me ... I'll definitely look
at dystonia on the Web ..
Regards,
Yuri
Well, you might wish to talk to David Leisner about his experiences
with focal dystonia.
He seems to be rather down on the medical profession as far as their
knowledge base on focal dystonia is concerned. His contempt may be
understandable given his personal experience. Still, you are probably
best off starting with a good hand surgeon.
The only hand surgeon I've seen myself is Mukund Patel, who is chief of
hand surgery at Maimonides in Brooklyn. He did no surgery on me, but he
did on my sister in law, and it came out well. Not much of a
recommendation I know, but it's all I've got.

Good luck,
Steve
c***@aol.com
2009-05-03 16:15:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by y***@att.com
Post by y***@att.com
Hello to all!. I play classical guitar for many years and wonder if
anybody has similar problem ... In the last several years I noticed
that my index finger of right hand slowly is loosing it's mobility and
speed. At this point I can play much faster with m-a combination
rather than i-m or i-a. It's really very upsetting - I have to relearn
many pieces. If I try to play a lot of exercises for i-m combination I
start experiencing almost a pain in the place where index finger
connects to the hand ...
Couple of years ago I went to a hand surgeon, but he really didn't
find any problems (he thinks that maybe it's arthritis originating in
the neck).
Very frustrating ... Any ideas or suggestions?
Regards,
Yuri
I can't tell what you are doing unless I see it. The most common
causes of right hand problems is a lack of coordintation of joints-
joints flex together and release together- and not using natural
release. Having said that, it could be anything. Put something up on
youtube and we'll all take a look.
Thanks to all for the advices ... I don't think I'm doing anything
wrong ... I play guitar for 40 years, some of it professionally. I
studied in Academy of Music in Jerusalem, so I think my technique is
pretty solid. It's really difficult to explain this condition. The
index finger just lost it's velocity... When I try to play more
exercises with i-m fingers I develop light pain right between the
knuckles of i and m finger. Taking a break for several weeks didn't
help, on the opposite it took very long time to get back to where I
left off. I'd be happy to find a doctor specializing in hand/finger
problems. I live not far from NYC - anybody can recomend a doctor? BTW
I talked long time ago about this problem with Matanya Ophee and he
suggested to move guitar to the right knee and play similar to
flamenco style. I think he had similar problem at one time. Looks like
it helped him, but didn't do anything for me ...  I'll definitely look
at dystonia on the Web ..
Regards,
   Yuri
        Well, you might wish to talk to David Leisner about his experiences
with focal dystonia.
        He seems to be rather down on the medical profession as far as their
knowledge base on focal dystonia is concerned.  His contempt may be
understandable given his personal experience.  Still, you are probably
best off starting with a good hand surgeon.
        The only hand surgeon I've seen myself is Mukund Patel, who is chief of
hand surgery at Maimonides in Brooklyn.  He did no surgery on me, but he
did on my sister in law, and it came out well.  Not much of a
recommendation I know, but it's all I've got.
Good luck,
Steve
There is a clinic in Spain that has "cured" dystonics through
retraining the neuromuscular systems (see the youtube videos). There
is a clinic in San Francisco, I believe, that has a therapy of
immobilization of the non-dystonic fingers with some quicker and
positive results and David Leisner also claims some success with large
muscle retraining (not only for himself but with others). I think the
reason the conventional medical profession has not investigated this
is because it is relatively rare (not enough money in it), is confused
with other types of dystonia, and, prior to brain imaging, was masked
as other ailments.

There is no evidence to support the contention that it arises from any
defect in technique, though a study showed that it could be developed
in monkeys from overuse. There is also evidence that there may be a
genetic predisposition to it. New brain imaging techniques have given
rise to more studies about it and a clearer understanding as to what
is going on neurologically. Still unsure why some get it and some
don't.

Kevin T.
Miguel de Maria
2009-05-03 16:49:39 UTC
Permalink
http://www.davidleisner.com/CuringFocalDystonia.html

I have a friend in England who got this, and wanted to consult with
Leisner about it. Apparently he was charging a large amount, perhaps
$1K+, simply for a telephone conversation about it.
Post by c***@aol.com
There is a clinic in Spain that has "cured" dystonics through
retraining the neuromuscular systems (see the youtube videos). There
is a clinic in San Francisco, I believe, that has a therapy of
immobilization of the non-dystonic fingers with some quicker and
positive results and David Leisner also claims some success with large
muscle retraining (not only for himself but with others). I think the
reason the conventional medical profession has not investigated  this
is because it is relatively rare (not enough money in it), is confused
with other types of dystonia, and, prior to brain imaging, was masked
as other ailments.
h kiesel
2009-05-03 18:33:33 UTC
Permalink
It's sad that he has to gouge to that degree, if he in fact charges that
much. Kind of alters my thinking of him.

hk
"Miguel de Maria" <***@gmail.com> wrote in message news:e74573ba-1183-4eaf-9030-***@d19g2000prh.googlegroups.com...
http://www.davidleisner.com/CuringFocalDystonia.html

I have a friend in England who got this, and wanted to consult with
Leisner about it. Apparently he was charging a large amount, perhaps
$1K+, simply for a telephone conversation about it.
Post by c***@aol.com
There is a clinic in Spain that has "cured" dystonics through
retraining the neuromuscular systems (see the youtube videos). There
is a clinic in San Francisco, I believe, that has a therapy of
immobilization of the non-dystonic fingers with some quicker and
positive results and David Leisner also claims some success with large
muscle retraining (not only for himself but with others). I think the
reason the conventional medical profession has not investigated this
is because it is relatively rare (not enough money in it), is confused
with other types of dystonia, and, prior to brain imaging, was masked
as other ailments.
Steven Bornfeld
2009-05-03 22:28:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by h kiesel
It's sad that he has to gouge to that degree, if he in fact charges that
much. Kind of alters my thinking of him.
I'd check his license first.

Steve (I believe that's a class "E" felony in NY State)
Post by h kiesel
hk
http://www.davidleisner.com/CuringFocalDystonia.html
I have a friend in England who got this, and wanted to consult with
Leisner about it. Apparently he was charging a large amount, perhaps
$1K+, simply for a telephone conversation about it.
Post by c***@aol.com
There is a clinic in Spain that has "cured" dystonics through
retraining the neuromuscular systems (see the youtube videos). There
is a clinic in San Francisco, I believe, that has a therapy of
immobilization of the non-dystonic fingers with some quicker and
positive results and David Leisner also claims some success with large
muscle retraining (not only for himself but with others). I think the
reason the conventional medical profession has not investigated this
is because it is relatively rare (not enough money in it), is confused
with other types of dystonia, and, prior to brain imaging, was masked
as other ailments.
c***@aol.com
2009-05-04 02:52:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by h kiesel
It's sad that he has to gouge to that degree, if he in fact charges that
much. Kind of alters my thinking of him.
hk
I have a friend in England who got this, and wanted to consult with
Leisner about it.  Apparently he was charging a large amount, perhaps
$1K+, simply for a telephone conversation about it.
This is pure nonsense and gossip. David has never invoiced me for
telephone conversations. We even talked about dystonia at length once
- a conversation he probably had a hundred times. He happens to be an
extraordinary player and a real braniac who cured humself of the
ailment. I believe he has something significant to add to the
conversation about this. Although I don't know him well, from all my
dealings with him, he is a person of dignity and high character. To
spread this garbage is shameful.

Kevin Taylor
h kiesel
2009-05-04 12:14:17 UTC
Permalink
Thank you for your comment and introducing doubt.

hk
Post by h kiesel
It's sad that he has to gouge to that degree, if he in fact charges that
much. Kind of alters my thinking of him.
hk
I have a friend in England who got this, and wanted to consult with
Leisner about it. Apparently he was charging a large amount, perhaps
$1K+, simply for a telephone conversation about it.
This is pure nonsense and gossip. David has never invoiced me for
telephone conversations. We even talked about dystonia at length once
- a conversation he probably had a hundred times. He happens to be an
extraordinary player and a real braniac who cured humself of the
ailment. I believe he has something significant to add to the
conversation about this. Although I don't know him well, from all my
dealings with him, he is a person of dignity and high character. To
spread this garbage is shameful.

Kevin Taylor
h***@verizon.net
2009-05-04 15:29:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by h kiesel
Thank you for your comment and introducing doubt.
Post by h kiesel
It's sad that he has to gouge to that degree, if he in fact charges that
much. Kind of alters my thinking of him.
hk
I have a friend in England who got this, and wanted to consult with
Leisner about it. Apparently he was charging a large amount, perhaps
$1K+, simply for a telephone conversation about it.
This is pure nonsense and gossip. David has never invoiced me for
telephone conversations. We even talked about dystonia at length once
- a conversation he probably had a hundred times. He happens to be an
extraordinary player and a real braniac who cured humself of the
ailment. I believe he has something significant to add to the
conversation about this. Although I don't know him well, from all my
dealings with him, he is a person of dignity and high character. To
spread this garbage is shameful.
Kevin Taylor
I know David Leisner and this rumor about the huge fees is
ridiculous! Kevin is quite correct about his character and
integrity. Kevin is not introducing doubt, he is right on the money.

Seth
Miguel de Maria
2009-05-04 15:34:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by h kiesel
Thank you for your comment and introducing doubt.
Doc, I don't have proof, just the account of a person who did
correspond with him. This is a guitarist in England who developed
FD. Because the condition seems so utterly terrible, I have always
kept my eye out on news about the condition. So when I heard about
Leisner, I forwarded it to the guitarist. He then told me what I
related, that when he emailed Leisner that he quoted him an outrageous
fee (not in doctor terms, of course--I've been charged $1000 for 5
minutes of doc time before :)). The person who told me this is, as
far as I know, completely honest; and I know him a lot better than
Kevin knows Leisner.

Perhaps there were extenuating circumstances. Perhaps he was drowning
in medical bills and needed some quick cash. Maybe it was just a way
to tell someone to buzz off, etc. I find it a breach of collegiality,
but that's only my opinion.
Miguel de Maria
2009-05-04 15:29:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by c***@aol.com
Post by h kiesel
It's sad that he has to gouge to that degree, if he in fact charges that
much. Kind of alters my thinking of him.
hk
I have a friend in England who got this, and wanted to consult with
Leisner about it.  Apparently he was charging a large amount, perhaps
$1K+, simply for a telephone conversation about it.
This is pure nonsense and gossip. David has never invoiced me for
telephone conversations. We even talked about dystonia at length once
- a conversation he probably had a hundred times. He happens to be an
extraordinary player and a real braniac who cured humself of the
ailment. I believe he has something significant to add to the
conversation about this. Although I don't know him well, from all my
dealings with him, he is a person of dignity and high character. To
spread this garbage is shameful.
Kevin Taylor
Don't be so quick to spout off about something you don't know about.
Simply because he didn't charge you doesn't mean he wouldn't charge
someone else, or in fact the average person. His being a great player
has no bearing on whether or not he would charge for a consultation.
And being such an uber-capitalist, I find it strange you think a
person of dignity and character wouldn't charge for such a
consultation. I'm sure you consider yourself quite brimming of
character and intelligence, yet you still charge for what you do.
Miguel de Maria
2009-05-05 17:03:54 UTC
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Post by h kiesel
It's sad that he has to gouge to that degree, if he in fact charges that
much. Kind of alters my thinking of him.
hk
I have a friend in England who got this, and wanted to consult with
Leisner about it.  Apparently he was charging a large amount, perhaps
$1K+, simply for a telephone conversation about it.
Post by c***@aol.com
There is a clinic in Spain that has "cured" dystonics through
retraining the neuromuscular systems (see the youtube videos). There
is a clinic in San Francisco, I believe, that has a therapy of
immobilization of the non-dystonic fingers with some quicker and
positive results and David Leisner also claims some success with large
muscle retraining (not only for himself but with others). I think the
reason the conventional medical profession has not investigated this
is because it is relatively rare (not enough money in it), is confused
with other types of dystonia, and, prior to brain imaging, was masked
as other ailments.- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
Doc, I talked to my friend and got the particulars:

The fee was for a personal consultation, which would consist in seeing
him for several days' in a row. Apparently a telephone consultation
was not on the table. The fee was also the same that Leisner would
charge for normal lessons. Given that he is a semi-famous guitarist,
a semi-large fee for the described service seems reasonable (to me).

I don't have any explanation why it had to be in-person for a
guitarist in Britain and free and telephonic for Kevin Taylor. But
then the latter is a person of high stature and commendable reserve.