Discussion:
Wise words
(too old to reply)
tom g
2021-08-23 11:20:01 UTC
Permalink
"In my experience you can be impressed by a person's sound for about two minutes and then mostly you want to hear a story."

From a masterclass with the great American baritone, Nathan Gunn.
Ted Haskell
2021-08-23 17:08:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by tom g
"In my experience you can be impressed by a person's sound for about two minutes and then mostly you want to hear a story."
From a masterclass with the great American baritone, Nathan Gunn.
Was he a founding member of Short Attention Span Theater?
tom g
2021-08-23 17:42:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ted Haskell
Post by tom g
"In my experience you can be impressed by a person's sound for about two minutes and then mostly you want to hear a story."
From a masterclass with the great American baritone, Nathan Gunn.
Was he a founding member of Short Attention Span Theater?
Well, a cat can look at a king as my wife says. Do you know who he is? Have you listened to him? He has the experience and musical sensitivity to know what he is talking about.
Matt Faunce
2021-08-23 19:53:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by tom g
Post by Ted Haskell
Post by tom g
"In my experience you can be impressed by a person's sound for about
two minutes and then mostly you want to hear a story."
From a masterclass with the great American baritone, Nathan Gunn.
Was he a founding member of Short Attention Span Theater?
Well, a cat can look at a king as my wife says. Do you know who he is?
Have you listened to him? He has the experience and musical sensitivity
to know what he is talking about.
I think that the audience at the premiere of Le Sacre weren’t hearing a
story. They probably got agitated about two minutes in. I wonder how long
it took for the rioting to start.

When I was a sophomore in music school I took extra care in learning to
hear music from the perspective of what was expected in the different time
periods. I asked myself, “what’s wrong with parallel fifths and octaves?”;
“What’s wrong with a voice making two successive leaps in the same
direction?”; “Is the melodic tritone always evil?”; “Where’s the surprise
in Haydn’s Surprise Symphony?” I think I came to understand the answers
fairly well considering my not living in their time.

Three years ago, or so, I went to a “contemporary classical” concert put on
by students or young graduates, at a local museum. I was agitated by the
lack of the music telling a story. It was all “static music” like Lontano
by Ligeti. If it weren’t free I would have liked to riot. So I asked myself
if I’m just listening from the perspective of a foreign time period. I
don’t know the answer to this question, but I think about it.

I think the trend of “static music” started with Beethoven stretching out
the arch—“flattening the curve”—with that long and slow section of his
Hammerklavier sonata. Then later composers decided to prolong the lockdown
indefinitely. I haven’t been following the latest trends but it wouldn’t
surprise me if most composers are attempting to inject their audiences with
DNA-changing, graphene-infused music which will lead to a zombie
apocalypse... and the end of storytelling.
--
Matt
tom g
2021-08-23 20:14:04 UTC
Permalink
On Monday, August 23, 2021 at 9:53:20 PM UTC+2, matt
Post by Matt Faunce
Post by tom g
Post by Ted Haskell
Post by tom g
"In my experience you can be impressed by a person's sound for about
two minutes and then mostly you want to hear a story."
From a masterclass with the great American baritone, Nathan Gunn.
Was he a founding member of Short Attention Span Theater?
Well, a cat can look at a king as my wife says. Do you know who he is?
Have you listened to him? He has the experience and musical sensitivity
to know what he is talking about.
I think that the audience at the premiere of Le Sacre weren’t hearing a
story. They probably got agitated about two minutes in. I wonder how long
it took for the rioting to start.
When I was a sophomore in music school I took extra care in learning to
hear music from the perspective of what was expected in the different time
periods. I asked myself, “what’s wrong with parallel fifths and octaves?”;
“What’s wrong with a voice making two successive leaps in the same
direction?”; “Is the melodic tritone always evil?”; “Where’s the surprise
in Haydn’s Surprise Symphony?” I think I came to understand the answers
fairly well considering my not living in their time.
Three years ago, or so, I went to a “contemporary classical” concert put on
by students or young graduates, at a local museum. I was agitated by the
lack of the music telling a story. It was all “static music” like Lontano
by Ligeti. If it weren’t free I would have liked to riot. So I asked myself
if I’m just listening from the perspective of a foreign time period. I
don’t know the answer to this question, but I think about it.
I think the trend of “static music” started with Beethoven stretching out
the arch—“flattening the curve”—with that long and slow section of his
Hammerklavier sonata. Then later composers decided to prolong the lockdown
indefinitely. I haven’t been following the latest trends but it wouldn’t
surprise me if most composers are attempting to inject their audiences with
DNA-changing, graphene-infused music which will lead to a zombie
apocalypse... and the end of storytelling.
--
Matt
"I haven’t been following the latest trends but it wouldn’t
surprise me if most composers are attempting to inject their audiences with
DNA-changing, graphene-infused music which will lead to a zombie
apocalypse... and the end of storytelling."

+1 (and +1 for the metaphor).

Nathan Gunn should know all about tone. He has one of the finest baritones in the world but he is wise enough to know that it is not enough. As a professor, he has to pay attention to the end of a student's performance but he probably knows what to say within those first 2 minutes.
Matt Faunce
2021-08-23 23:17:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by tom g
On Monday, August 23, 2021 at 9:53:20 PM UTC+2, matt
Post by Matt Faunce
Post by tom g
Post by Ted Haskell
Post by tom g
"In my experience you can be impressed by a person's sound for about
two minutes and then mostly you want to hear a story."
From a masterclass with the great American baritone, Nathan Gunn.
Was he a founding member of Short Attention Span Theater?
Well, a cat can look at a king as my wife says. Do you know who he is?
Have you listened to him? He has the experience and musical sensitivity
to know what he is talking about.
I think that the audience at the premiere of Le Sacre weren’t hearing a
story. They probably got agitated about two minutes in. I wonder how long
it took for the rioting to start.
When I was a sophomore in music school I took extra care in learning to
hear music from the perspective of what was expected in the different time
periods. I asked myself, “what’s wrong with parallel fifths and octaves?”;
“What’s wrong with a voice making two successive leaps in the same
direction?”; “Is the melodic tritone always evil?”; “Where’s the surprise
in Haydn’s Surprise Symphony?” I think I came to understand the answers
fairly well considering my not living in their time.
Three years ago, or so, I went to a “contemporary classical” concert put on
by students or young graduates, at a local museum. I was agitated by the
lack of the music telling a story. It was all “static music” like Lontano
by Ligeti. If it weren’t free I would have liked to riot. So I asked myself
if I’m just listening from the perspective of a foreign time period. I
don’t know the answer to this question, but I think about it.
I think the trend of “static music” started with Beethoven stretching out
the arch—“flattening the curve”—with that long and slow section of his
Hammerklavier sonata. Then later composers decided to prolong the lockdown
indefinitely. I haven’t been following the latest trends but it wouldn’t
surprise me if most composers are attempting to inject their audiences with
DNA-changing, graphene-infused music which will lead to a zombie
apocalypse... and the end of storytelling.
--
Matt
"I haven’t been following the latest trends but it wouldn’t
surprise me if most composers are attempting to inject their audiences with
DNA-changing, graphene-infused music which will lead to a zombie
apocalypse... and the end of storytelling."
+1 (and +1 for the metaphor).
Nathan Gunn should know all about tone. He has one of the finest
baritones in the world but he is wise enough to know that it is not
enough. As a professor, he has to pay attention to the end of a student's
performance but he probably knows what to say within those first 2 minutes.
I’ll have to look for some of Gunn’s performances online.

I agree with him on the value of storytelling, broadly construed, but I do
see that the perception of what storytelling is was broadened over the
evolution of music. With Ligeti, I think, we reached the threshold of where
the story became static-ness. I like his works, particularly Lontano,
Atmosphères, and Apparitions, but I think they only have their place in a
program surrounded by music that goes somewhere, i.e., music with a
noticeable arch, i.e., that tells a story.

However, I think the original quote pertains mostly to interpretation than
composition. So, I think he was mostly talking about bringing out the story
that’s in the composition.
--
Matt
tom g
2021-08-24 00:10:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by Matt Faunce
Post by tom g
On Monday, August 23, 2021 at 9:53:20 PM UTC+2, matt
Post by Matt Faunce
Post by tom g
Post by Ted Haskell
Post by tom g
"In my experience you can be impressed by a person's sound for about
two minutes and then mostly you want to hear a story."
From a masterclass with the great American baritone, Nathan Gunn.
Was he a founding member of Short Attention Span Theater?
Well, a cat can look at a king as my wife says. Do you know who he is?
Have you listened to him? He has the experience and musical sensitivity
to know what he is talking about.
I think that the audience at the premiere of Le Sacre weren’t hearing a
story. They probably got agitated about two minutes in. I wonder how long
it took for the rioting to start.
When I was a sophomore in music school I took extra care in learning to
hear music from the perspective of what was expected in the different time
periods. I asked myself, “what’s wrong with parallel fifths and octaves?”;
“What’s wrong with a voice making two successive leaps in the same
direction?”; “Is the melodic tritone always evil?”; “Where’s the surprise
in Haydn’s Surprise Symphony?” I think I came to understand the answers
fairly well considering my not living in their time.
Three years ago, or so, I went to a “contemporary classical” concert put on
by students or young graduates, at a local museum. I was agitated by the
lack of the music telling a story. It was all “static music” like Lontano
by Ligeti. If it weren’t free I would have liked to riot. So I asked myself
if I’m just listening from the perspective of a foreign time period. I
don’t know the answer to this question, but I think about it.
I think the trend of “static music” started with Beethoven stretching out
the arch—“flattening the curve”—with that long and slow section of his
Hammerklavier sonata. Then later composers decided to prolong the lockdown
indefinitely. I haven’t been following the latest trends but it wouldn’t
surprise me if most composers are attempting to inject their audiences with
DNA-changing, graphene-infused music which will lead to a zombie
apocalypse... and the end of storytelling.
--
Matt
"I haven’t been following the latest trends but it wouldn’t
surprise me if most composers are attempting to inject their audiences with
DNA-changing, graphene-infused music which will lead to a zombie
apocalypse... and the end of storytelling."
+1 (and +1 for the metaphor).
Nathan Gunn should know all about tone. He has one of the finest
baritones in the world but he is wise enough to know that it is not
enough. As a professor, he has to pay attention to the end of a student's
performance but he probably knows what to say within those first 2 minutes.
I’ll have to look for some of Gunn’s performances online.
I agree with him on the value of storytelling, broadly construed, but I do
see that the perception of what storytelling is was broadened over the
evolution of music. With Ligeti, I think, we reached the threshold of where
the story became static-ness. I like his works, particularly Lontano,
Atmosphères, and Apparitions, but I think they only have their place in a
program surrounded by music that goes somewhere, i.e., music with a
noticeable arch, i.e., that tells a story.
However, I think the original quote pertains mostly to interpretation than
composition. So, I think he was mostly talking about bringing out the story
that’s in the composition.
--
Matt
As long as there is tension and release in music, there will be a story.

Lontano always seemed like film music to me for its unrelenting atmospherics.
Nice choice by Martin Scorsese to use it for Shutter Island!

If you haven't listened to Nathan Gunn, I hope you will have a very nice experience. Some of his best work hasn't been recorded yet. A very versatile singer with a great sense of drama who can characterise his work in so many different ways and, with powerful lungs available, also knows how to use a microphone. Recently I compared his voice with another great baritone, Bryn Terfel, who is also a versatile singer. It made me conscious of Gunn's great tonal purity and pitch sense.

(Yes, I joined my local choir recently and have been listening to many great singers.)
Matt Faunce
2021-09-02 14:41:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by Matt Faunce
Then later composers decided to prolong the lockdown
indefinitely. I haven’t been following the latest trends but it wouldn’t
surprise me if most composers are attempting to inject their audiences with
DNA-changing, graphene-infused music which will lead to a zombie
apocalypse... and the end of storytelling.
Amazon thinks this is funny. Scroll down and read paragraph 42.10 in their
terms of service.

https://aws.amazon.com/service-terms/
--
Matt
JMF
2021-09-02 15:37:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by Matt Faunce
Post by Matt Faunce
Then later composers decided to prolong the lockdown
indefinitely. I haven’t been following the latest trends but it wouldn’t
surprise me if most composers are attempting to inject their audiences with
DNA-changing, graphene-infused music which will lead to a zombie
apocalypse... and the end of storytelling.
Amazon thinks this is funny. Scroll down and read paragraph 42.10 in their
terms of service.
https://aws.amazon.com/service-terms/
That's great -- how the heck did you ever see that needle in the haystack?
Matt Faunce
2021-09-02 20:04:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by JMF
Post by Matt Faunce
Post by Matt Faunce
Then later composers decided to prolong the lockdown
indefinitely. I haven’t been following the latest trends but it wouldn’t
surprise me if most composers are attempting to inject their audiences with
DNA-changing, graphene-infused music which will lead to a zombie
apocalypse... and the end of storytelling.
Amazon thinks this is funny. Scroll down and read paragraph 42.10 in their
terms of service.
https://aws.amazon.com/service-terms/
That's great -- how the heck did you ever see that needle in the haystack?
Someone I’ve been recently following, or eh tuning in to, on Twitter
reposted someone’s Tic Tok video about it. Here.

https://mobile.twitter.com/Alpha_Mind7/status/1433126515068317701

If you don’t have a Twitter account—I don’t, so I know—you can go to this
URL and scroll down. https://mobile.twitter.com/alpha_mind7/with_replies

BTW, I’m wary of prolific posters like this account. Even if most of the
information is good, I think the overall sway of the posts might be
deliberately designed to inject an attitude into its followers that makes
them contemptuous of people from the opposite camp who are probably
following prolific posters (or a team of less prolific posters) who want
them to hate their opposites. It smells like it might be one side of a
divide and conquer tactic. I only recently started following this Twitter
user, but I’ve more clearly seen this tactic elsewhere.
--
Matt
Matt Faunce
2021-09-26 01:26:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by Matt Faunce
Post by JMF
Post by Matt Faunce
Post by Matt Faunce
Then later composers decided to prolong the lockdown
indefinitely. I haven’t been following the latest trends but it wouldn’t
surprise me if most composers are attempting to inject their audiences with
DNA-changing, graphene-infused music which will lead to a zombie
apocalypse... and the end of storytelling.
Amazon thinks this is funny. Scroll down and read paragraph 42.10 in their
terms of service.
https://aws.amazon.com/service-terms/
That's great -- how the heck did you ever see that needle in the haystack?
Someone I’ve been recently following, or eh tuning in to, on Twitter
reposted someone’s Tic Tok video about it. Here.
https://mobile.twitter.com/Alpha_Mind7/status/1433126515068317701
If you don’t have a Twitter account—I don’t, so I know—you can go to this
URL and scroll down. https://mobile.twitter.com/alpha_mind7/with_replies