Discussion:
Baden Powell - Prelude in A minor
(too old to reply)
Steve Freides
2011-04-17 17:57:34 UTC
Permalink
Baden Powell - Prelude in A minor

I was just listening to this on YouTube, played by Baden Powell at a
concert.

Anyone else play this, anyone else know of a recording of it they like?

Thanks.

-S-
Andrew Schulman
2011-04-17 20:11:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by Steve Freides
Baden Powell - Prelude in A minor
I was just listening to this on YouTube, played by Baden Powell at a
concert.
Anyone else play this, anyone else know of a recording of it they like?
Thanks.
Funny you post this, I was just re-working some BP pieces. This
Prelude (1983) can be downloaded here:

http://www.brazil-on-guitar.de/tabs.html

Will read through, beautiful Prelude and great etude as well.

Andrew
Steve Freides
2011-04-18 00:01:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by Andrew Schulman
Post by Steve Freides
Baden Powell - Prelude in A minor
I was just listening to this on YouTube, played by Baden Powell at a
concert.
Anyone else play this, anyone else know of a recording of it they like?
Thanks.
Funny you post this, I was just re-working some BP pieces. This
http://www.brazil-on-guitar.de/tabs.html
Will read through, beautiful Prelude and great etude as well.
Andrew
Interesting - the PDF says "transcribed ..." so does that mean he didn't
publish the music?

I might be interested in trying to play a shorter version - it's long.

-S-
Stanley Yates
2011-04-18 14:34:12 UTC
Permalink
Hi Steve,

As you may know, I'm quite a fan of BP's music. As far as I know, everything
that's available in notation has been transcribed from his recordings rather
than written dwon by him, and not all of the available transcriptions are
great. I've transcribed a dozen of so things of his myself and somewhere on
the Internet there are several hundred pages of pdfs hosted, I believe, by
his son (maybe at Andrew's link?). And this still isn't all of his music...
The Prelude you mention is a beautiful chord progression. The problem,
though, is maintaining the circular arpeggios for the nine minutes (or
whatever it is) required to play the piece. He had amazing facility at his
best, and even in later years quite a bit of this was still there.

sy
Post by Steve Freides
Post by Andrew Schulman
Post by Steve Freides
Baden Powell - Prelude in A minor
I was just listening to this on YouTube, played by Baden Powell at a
concert.
Anyone else play this, anyone else know of a recording of it they like?
Thanks.
Funny you post this, I was just re-working some BP pieces. This
http://www.brazil-on-guitar.de/tabs.html
Will read through, beautiful Prelude and great etude as well.
Andrew
Interesting - the PDF says "transcribed ..." so does that mean he didn't
publish the music?
I might be interested in trying to play a shorter version - it's long.
-S-
Steve Freides
2011-04-18 17:22:30 UTC
Permalink
Thank you, Stanley.

I wonder what the legality of putting the Prelude into Sibelius and
making it available as a PDF for free would be? I could do that fairly
easily, I think, based on what's already available. The notation + tab
version would make me crazy to actually play from but I could read it at
the computer well enough to get it into Sibelius.

Truth be told, I would love to see a shorter version of it for students
to play as a right-hand etude - rather than an endurance exercise. :)

I also noticed on the link Andrew gave a version from a few years later
that, at first glace, appears to be very similar - do you have any idea
what the differences are between those two Preludes?

-S-
Post by Stanley Yates
Hi Steve,
As you may know, I'm quite a fan of BP's music. As far as I know,
everything that's available in notation has been transcribed from his
recordings rather than written dwon by him, and not all of the
available transcriptions are great. I've transcribed a dozen of so
things of his myself and somewhere on the Internet there are several
hundred pages of pdfs hosted, I believe, by his son (maybe at
Andrew's link?). And this still isn't all of his music... The Prelude
you mention is a beautiful chord progression. The problem, though, is
maintaining the circular arpeggios for the nine minutes (or whatever
it is) required to play the piece. He had amazing facility at his
best, and even in later years quite a bit of this was still there.
sy
Post by Steve Freides
Post by Andrew Schulman
Post by Steve Freides
Baden Powell - Prelude in A minor
I was just listening to this on YouTube, played by Baden Powell at
a concert.
Anyone else play this, anyone else know of a recording of it they like?
Thanks.
Funny you post this, I was just re-working some BP pieces. This
http://www.brazil-on-guitar.de/tabs.html
Will read through, beautiful Prelude and great etude as well.
Andrew
Interesting - the PDF says "transcribed ..." so does that mean he
didn't publish the music?
I might be interested in trying to play a shorter version - it's
long. -S-
Steve Freides
2011-04-18 17:25:14 UTC
Permalink
BTW, I should mention that I "discovered" Baden Powell - certainly knew
the name from hearing Stanley talk about it, among other sources - while
looking up Dieter Hopf, the luthier. I've been playing one of his
instruments here and it's a real gem. Apparently Baden Powell played a
Hopf at certain times in his life.

-S-
Post by Steve Freides
Thank you, Stanley.
I wonder what the legality of putting the Prelude into Sibelius and
making it available as a PDF for free would be? I could do that
fairly easily, I think, based on what's already available. The
notation + tab version would make me crazy to actually play from but
I could read it at the computer well enough to get it into Sibelius.
Truth be told, I would love to see a shorter version of it for
students to play as a right-hand etude - rather than an endurance
exercise. :)
I also noticed on the link Andrew gave a version from a few years
later that, at first glace, appears to be very similar - do you have
any idea what the differences are between those two Preludes?
-S-
Post by Stanley Yates
Hi Steve,
As you may know, I'm quite a fan of BP's music. As far as I know,
everything that's available in notation has been transcribed from his
recordings rather than written dwon by him, and not all of the
available transcriptions are great. I've transcribed a dozen of so
things of his myself and somewhere on the Internet there are several
hundred pages of pdfs hosted, I believe, by his son (maybe at
Andrew's link?). And this still isn't all of his music... The Prelude
you mention is a beautiful chord progression. The problem, though, is
maintaining the circular arpeggios for the nine minutes (or whatever
it is) required to play the piece. He had amazing facility at his
best, and even in later years quite a bit of this was still there.
sy
Post by Steve Freides
Post by Andrew Schulman
Post by Steve Freides
Baden Powell - Prelude in A minor
I was just listening to this on YouTube, played by Baden Powell at
a concert.
Anyone else play this, anyone else know of a recording of it they like?
Thanks.
Funny you post this, I was just re-working some BP pieces. This
http://www.brazil-on-guitar.de/tabs.html
Will read through, beautiful Prelude and great etude as well.
Andrew
Interesting - the PDF says "transcribed ..." so does that mean he
didn't publish the music?
I might be interested in trying to play a shorter version - it's
long. -S-
Stanley Yates
2011-04-18 19:03:43 UTC
Permalink
Steve,

I think they're just different versions of the same piece - he rarely seeemd
to play anything the same way twice. There's a lot of repetition, if I
rememeber correctly, so there's probably a straightforward way to shorten it
for your own use. As far as making your own pdf version available, I think
you would need to clear it with the son, Philippe at
http://www.brazil-on-guitar.de/read_this.html

Stanley
Post by Steve Freides
Thank you, Stanley.
I wonder what the legality of putting the Prelude into Sibelius and making
it available as a PDF for free would be? I could do that fairly easily, I
think, based on what's already available. The notation + tab version
would make me crazy to actually play from but I could read it at the
computer well enough to get it into Sibelius.
Truth be told, I would love to see a shorter version of it for students to
play as a right-hand etude - rather than an endurance exercise. :)
I also noticed on the link Andrew gave a version from a few years later
that, at first glace, appears to be very similar - do you have any idea
what the differences are between those two Preludes?
-S-
Post by Stanley Yates
Hi Steve,
As you may know, I'm quite a fan of BP's music. As far as I know,
everything that's available in notation has been transcribed from his
recordings rather than written dwon by him, and not all of the
available transcriptions are great. I've transcribed a dozen of so
things of his myself and somewhere on the Internet there are several
hundred pages of pdfs hosted, I believe, by his son (maybe at
Andrew's link?). And this still isn't all of his music... The Prelude
you mention is a beautiful chord progression. The problem, though, is
maintaining the circular arpeggios for the nine minutes (or whatever
it is) required to play the piece. He had amazing facility at his
best, and even in later years quite a bit of this was still there.
sy
Post by Steve Freides
Post by Andrew Schulman
Post by Steve Freides
Baden Powell - Prelude in A minor
I was just listening to this on YouTube, played by Baden Powell at
a concert.
Anyone else play this, anyone else know of a recording of it they like?
Thanks.
Funny you post this, I was just re-working some BP pieces. This
http://www.brazil-on-guitar.de/tabs.html
Will read through, beautiful Prelude and great etude as well.
Andrew
Interesting - the PDF says "transcribed ..." so does that mean he
didn't publish the music?
I might be interested in trying to play a shorter version - it's
long. -S-
Miguel de Maria
2011-04-18 17:24:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by Stanley Yates
Hi Steve,
As you may know, I'm quite a fan of BP's music. As far as I know, everything
that's available in notation has been transcribed from his recordings rather
than written dwon by him, and not all of the available transcriptions are
great. I've transcribed a dozen of so things of his myself and somewhere on
the Internet there are several hundred pages of pdfs hosted, I believe, by
his son (maybe at Andrew's link?). And this still isn't all of his music...
The Prelude you mention is a beautiful chord progression. The problem,
though, is maintaining the circular arpeggios for the nine minutes (or
whatever it is) required to play the piece. He had amazing facility at his
best, and even in later years quite a bit of this was still there.
sy
Post by Steve Freides
Post by Steve Freides
Baden Powell - Prelude in A minor
I was just listening to this on YouTube, played by Baden Powell at a
concert.
Anyone else play this, anyone else know of a recording of it they like?
Thanks.
Funny you post this, I was just re-working some BP pieces.  This
http://www.brazil-on-guitar.de/tabs.html
Will read through, beautiful Prelude and great etude as well.
Andrew
Interesting - the PDF says "transcribed ..." so does that mean he didn't
publish the music?
I might be interested in trying to play a shorter version - it's long.
-S-
He also managed to have facility while transmitting a lot of
"personalidade" with the guitar--not a given in CG, IMHO.
Steve Freides
2011-04-18 17:27:32 UTC
Permalink
Post by Miguel de Maria
Post by Stanley Yates
Hi Steve,
As you may know, I'm quite a fan of BP's music. As far as I know,
everything that's available in notation has been transcribed from
his recordings rather than written dwon by him, and not all of the
available transcriptions are great. I've transcribed a dozen of so
things of his myself and somewhere on the Internet there are several
hundred pages of pdfs hosted, I believe, by his son (maybe at
Andrew's link?). And this still isn't all of his music... The
Prelude you mention is a beautiful chord progression. The problem,
though, is maintaining the circular arpeggios for the nine minutes
(or whatever it is) required to play the piece. He had amazing
facility at his best, and even in later years quite a bit of this
was still there.
sy
Post by Steve Freides
Post by Steve Freides
Baden Powell - Prelude in A minor
I was just listening to this on YouTube, played by Baden Powell
at a concert.
Anyone else play this, anyone else know of a recording of it they like?
Thanks.
Funny you post this, I was just re-working some BP pieces. This
http://www.brazil-on-guitar.de/tabs.html
Will read through, beautiful Prelude and great etude as well.
Andrew
Interesting - the PDF says "transcribed ..." so does that mean he
didn't publish the music?
I might be interested in trying to play a shorter version - it's long.
-S-
He also managed to have facility while transmitting a lot of
"personalidade" with the guitar--not a given in CG, IMHO.
Yes, I agree - you really feel like you're listening to _him_ play, not
just the music "being played."

I'm now waiting for some of our regulars to say:

1. His right hand position is all wrong and he's going to hurt himself
if he keeps playing like that.

2. His compositions are all wrong and he clearly doesn't understand
music theory or how to write for the guitar.

-S-
Miguel de Maria
2011-04-18 18:33:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by Steve Freides
Post by Miguel de Maria
Post by Stanley Yates
Hi Steve,
As you may know, I'm quite a fan of BP's music. As far as I know,
everything that's available in notation has been transcribed from
his recordings rather than written dwon by him, and not all of the
available transcriptions are great. I've transcribed a dozen of so
things of his myself and somewhere on the Internet there are several
hundred pages of pdfs hosted, I believe, by his son (maybe at
Andrew's link?). And this still isn't all of his music... The
Prelude you mention is a beautiful chord progression. The problem,
though, is maintaining the circular arpeggios for the nine minutes
(or whatever it is) required to play the piece. He had amazing
facility at his best, and even in later years quite a bit of this
was still there.
sy
Post by Steve Freides
Post by Steve Freides
Baden Powell - Prelude in A minor
I was just listening to this on YouTube, played by Baden Powell
at a concert.
Anyone else play this, anyone else know of a recording of it they like?
Thanks.
Funny you post this, I was just re-working some BP pieces. This
http://www.brazil-on-guitar.de/tabs.html
Will read through, beautiful Prelude and great etude as well.
Andrew
Interesting - the PDF says "transcribed ..." so does that mean he
didn't publish the music?
I might be interested in trying to play a shorter version - it's long.
-S-
He also managed to have facility while transmitting a lot of
"personalidade" with the guitar--not a given in CG, IMHO.
Yes, I agree - you really feel like you're listening to _him_ play, not
just the music "being played."
1.  His right hand position is all wrong and he's going to hurt himself
if he keeps playing like that.
2.  His compositions are all wrong and he clearly doesn't understand
music theory or how to write for the guitar.
-S-
Steve, his Samba Triste with the trio is just spectacular. I also
love his take on After Midnight. Someday I'm going to learn those
songs...
Richard Jernigan
2011-04-18 19:42:28 UTC
Permalink
 I also love his take on After Midnight.  
"Round About Midnight"?

RNJ
Miguel de Maria
2011-04-18 23:02:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by Richard Jernigan
 I also love his take on After Midnight.  
"Round About Midnight"?
RNJ
Er... what I mean is I like the part near the end. :)
dsi1
2011-04-18 20:23:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by Miguel de Maria
Steve, his Samba Triste with the trio is just spectacular. I also
love his take on After Midnight. Someday I'm going to learn those
songs...
Ya got great taste in music!
Miguel de Maria
2011-04-18 23:03:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by dsi1
Steve, his Samba Triste with the trio is just spectacular.  I also
love his take on After Midnight.  Someday I'm going to learn those
songs...
Ya got great taste in music!
Now that you mention it, so do you! :)
dsi1
2011-04-19 00:28:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by Miguel de Maria
Post by dsi1
Post by Miguel de Maria
Steve, his Samba Triste with the trio is just spectacular. I also
love his take on After Midnight. Someday I'm going to learn those
songs...
Ya got great taste in music!
Now that you mention it, so do you! :)
My favorite take on "Round Midnight" aka "Round About Midnight."



If he was any looser, he'd be under the piano. :-)
Miguel de Maria
2011-04-19 05:14:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by dsi1
Post by Miguel de Maria
Post by dsi1
Steve, his Samba Triste with the trio is just spectacular.  I also
love his take on After Midnight.  Someday I'm going to learn those
songs...
Ya got great taste in music!
Now that you mention it, so do you! :)
My favorite take on "Round Midnight" aka "Round About Midnight."
http://youtu.be/OMmeNsmQaFw
If he was any looser, he'd be under the piano. :-)
Thanks, that was great! I'd never seen him play.

Now check out this guy's loosey-goosey RH.

dsi1
2011-04-19 10:17:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by Miguel de Maria
Post by dsi1
Post by Miguel de Maria
Post by dsi1
Post by Miguel de Maria
Steve, his Samba Triste with the trio is just spectacular. I also
love his take on After Midnight. Someday I'm going to learn those
songs...
Ya got great taste in music!
Now that you mention it, so do you! :)
My favorite take on "Round Midnight" aka "Round About Midnight."
http://youtu.be/OMmeNsmQaFw
If he was any looser, he'd be under the piano. :-)
Thanks, that was great! I'd never seen him play.
Now check out this guy's loosey-goosey RH. http://youtu.be/TSUNbvb-DWg
That Samba Triste video is one of my favorites. Pretty impressive right
hand - how do these guys do it? He does a cute classical guitar style
part towards the end. You might have to be born Brazilian to play that
Brazilian rhythm.
Miguel de Maria
2011-04-19 16:27:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by dsi1
Post by dsi1
Post by Miguel de Maria
Post by dsi1
Steve, his Samba Triste with the trio is just spectacular.  I also
love his take on After Midnight.  Someday I'm going to learn those
songs...
Ya got great taste in music!
Now that you mention it, so do you! :)
My favorite take on "Round Midnight" aka "Round About Midnight."
http://youtu.be/OMmeNsmQaFw
If he was any looser, he'd be under the piano. :-)
Thanks, that was great!  I'd never seen him play.
Now check out this guy's loosey-goosey RH. http://youtu.be/TSUNbvb-DWg
That Samba Triste video is one of my favorites. Pretty impressive right
hand - how do these guys do it? He does a cute classical guitar style
part towards the end. You might have to be born Brazilian to play that
Brazilian rhythm.
I hope not! My friend Miguel and I are working on some right now. My
current "assignment" is Lapinha. Miguel is a Baden Powell freak.
Check out one of his flamenco vids if you have time.


dsi1
2011-04-19 19:44:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by Miguel de Maria
I hope not! My friend Miguel and I are working on some right now. My
current "assignment" is Lapinha. Miguel is a Baden Powell freak.
Check out one of his flamenco vids if you have time.
http://youtu.be/Z1rDZiV9bSg
Your buddy's dancing fingers are a joy to watch! As far as this
Brazilian rhythm being in the blood, I guess it's never right to say
never - unless you're saying that it's never right to say never. Just
that once instance is OK unless it's always true that you should never
say never in which case, it would pretty much be always false. Aww, you
know what I mean...
Steve Freides
2011-04-19 21:24:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by dsi1
I hope not! My friend Miguel and I are working on some right now. My
current "assignment" is Lapinha. Miguel is a Baden Powell freak.
Check out one of his flamenco vids if you have time.
http://youtu.be/Z1rDZiV9bSg
Your buddy's dancing fingers are a joy to watch! As far as this
Brazilian rhythm being in the blood, I guess it's never right to say
never - unless you're saying that it's never right to say never. Just
that once instance is OK unless it's always true that you should never
say never in which case, it would pretty much be always false. Aww,
you know what I mean...
You must be a lawyer.

-S-
dsi1
2011-04-19 21:46:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by Steve Freides
Post by dsi1
I hope not! My friend Miguel and I are working on some right now. My
current "assignment" is Lapinha. Miguel is a Baden Powell freak.
Check out one of his flamenco vids if you have time.
http://youtu.be/Z1rDZiV9bSg
Your buddy's dancing fingers are a joy to watch! As far as this
Brazilian rhythm being in the blood, I guess it's never right to say
never - unless you're saying that it's never right to say never. Just
that once instance is OK unless it's always true that you should never
say never in which case, it would pretty much be always false. Aww,
you know what I mean...
You must be a lawyer.
-S-
I could be a lawyer because I believe that any reality can be spun in
most any direction that you'd care to merely by the power of words.
Therein, however, lies the problem... :-)
Richard Jernigan
2011-04-20 00:09:49 UTC
Permalink
You might have to be born Brazilian to play that Brazilian rhythm.
At the 2000 Cuernavaca International Festival of the Guitar, Roland
Dyens played Baden's "Berimbau" and Tom Jobim's "A Felicidade". The
latter was the up-tempo samba version that the kid (the reincarnation
of Orfeu) plays at the end of the great movie "Orfeu Negro" [Black
Orpheus]. The next night Dyens and I happened to be walking out of the
concert hall at the same time.

I said to him, "Last night when you played 'Berimbau' I thought Baden
was going to come out of the guitar."

Dyens smiled in thanks.

"And I didn't know anyone but a Brazilian could play samba like you
played 'A Felicidade'."

Dyens smiled impishly and said, "Perhaps I was Brazilian in a former
life.."

RNJ
dsi1
2011-04-20 00:55:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by Richard Jernigan
You might have to be born Brazilian to play that Brazilian rhythm.
At the 2000 Cuernavaca International Festival of the Guitar, Roland
Dyens played Baden's "Berimbau" and Tom Jobim's "A Felicidade". The
latter was the up-tempo samba version that the kid (the reincarnation
of Orfeu) plays at the end of the great movie "Orfeu Negro" [Black
Orpheus]. The next night Dyens and I happened to be walking out of the
concert hall at the same time.
I said to him, "Last night when you played 'Berimbau' I thought Baden
was going to come out of the guitar."
Dyens smiled in thanks.
"And I didn't know anyone but a Brazilian could play samba like you
played 'A Felicidade'."
Dyens smiled impishly and said, "Perhaps I was Brazilian in a former
life.."
RNJ
I'm pretty jaded about this, my history of disappointment being a long
one. I remember being really excited about getting a Charley Byrd record
that was called "Sounds of Brazil" or something like that. The
wonderful, brilliant, parrot on the album cover told me that new vistas
of guitar sounds and rhythms from the jungle were at hand and that my
life would never be the same. A few seconds after breathlessly placing
the needle to the vinyl it became apparent that my life would continue
on the same path and things were just the way it always was. Wipe out!
The music seemed to be so flat and lifeless.

Beats the heck out of me what's going on - the stuff seems simple
enough. Dyens is a master of time and will always play a note at the
exact correct time even though a lot of it is pretty off the wall. The
horrible truth is that if any non-Brazilian could do it, it would be
that Frenchman. Sacrebleu!
Dick Cheney
2011-04-20 02:40:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by dsi1
Post by Richard Jernigan
You might have to be born Brazilian to play that Brazilian rhythm.
At the 2000 Cuernavaca International Festival of the Guitar, Roland
Dyens played Baden's "Berimbau" and Tom Jobim's "A Felicidade". The
latter was the up-tempo samba version that the kid (the reincarnation
of Orfeu) plays at the end of the great movie "Orfeu Negro" [Black
Orpheus]. The next night Dyens and I happened to be walking out of the
concert hall at the same time.
I said to him, "Last night when you played 'Berimbau' I thought Baden
was going to come out of the guitar."
Dyens smiled in thanks.
"And I didn't know anyone but a Brazilian could play samba like you
played 'A Felicidade'."
Dyens smiled impishly and said, "Perhaps I was Brazilian in a former
life.."
RNJ
I'm pretty jaded about this, my history of disappointment being a long
one. I remember being really excited about getting a Charley Byrd record
that was called "Sounds of Brazil" or something like that. The
wonderful, brilliant, parrot on the album cover told me that new vistas
of guitar sounds and rhythms from the jungle were at hand and that my
life would never be the same. A few seconds after breathlessly placing
the needle to the vinyl it became apparent that my life would continue
on the same path and things were just the way it always was. Wipe out!
The music seemed to be so flat and lifeless.
I have that Charlie Byrd album too. I played it twice just to make
sure it was as bland as I first thought. I had just read in the paper
about what a great guitarist he was.
I still have it somewhere.
dsi1
2011-04-20 08:58:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dick Cheney
I have that Charlie Byrd album too. I played it twice just to make
sure it was as bland as I first thought. I had just read in the paper
about what a great guitarist he was.
I still have it somewhere.
I typically won't comment on a guy's playing but CB has a lot of fans so
I suppose our comments won't hurt matters much. We jes evening it up a bit.

The funny thing is that he did the music for cooking shows that worked
quite well. This was a time before there were cooking channels on TV.
His original music really added a contemporary, laid-back feel to the
program. I got to hand it to him, he created a unique genre that was all
his own that I like to call "Byrd Food." OTOH, maybe I was just hungry. :-)
wollybird
2011-04-20 09:46:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by dsi1
Post by Dick Cheney
I have that Charlie Byrd album too. I played it twice just to make
sure it was as bland as I first thought. I had just read in the paper
about what a great guitarist he was.
  I still have it somewhere.
I typically won't comment on a guy's playing but CB has a lot of fans so
I suppose our comments won't hurt matters much. We jes evening it up a bit.
The funny thing is that he did the music for cooking shows that worked
quite well. This was a time before there were cooking channels on TV.
His original music really added a contemporary, laid-back feel to the
program. I got to hand it to him, he created a unique genre that was all
his own that I like to call "Byrd Food." OTOH, maybe I was just hungry. :-)
Bird Food (as served at the Minnesota zoo):
2 lbs mixed beans
4 cups of rice
1 lb orzo
2 lbs mixed vegetables
a gallon or so of water

bring water to a boil and add washed beans, reduce heat and simmer for
90 minutes, add rice, simmer for additional 25 minutes. turn off heat,
add orzo and stir. let sit for 30 minutes. The mixture should be
crumblyat this point. add frozen vegetables, stir and let sit for 30
minutes. freeze in individual containers until needed. serve over
seeds, and top with fruit.
note:
Kids like bird food for after school snack
birds like it any time

I really don't know Byrd's other stuff. The album you reference sure
brought back memories, though
Richard Jernigan
2011-04-20 03:55:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by dsi1
Post by Richard Jernigan
You might have to be born Brazilian to play that Brazilian rhythm.
At the 2000 Cuernavaca International Festival of the Guitar, Roland
Dyens played Baden's "Berimbau" and Tom Jobim's "A Felicidade". The
latter was the up-tempo samba version that the kid (the reincarnation
of Orfeu) plays at the end of the great movie "Orfeu Negro" [Black
Orpheus]. The next night Dyens and I happened to be walking out of the
concert hall at the same time.
I said to him, "Last night when you played 'Berimbau' I thought Baden
was going to come out of the guitar."
Dyens smiled in thanks.
"And I didn't know anyone but a Brazilian could play samba like you
played 'A Felicidade'."
Dyens smiled impishly and said, "Perhaps I was Brazilian in a former
life.."
RNJ
I'm pretty jaded about this, my history of disappointment being a long
one. I remember being really excited about getting a Charley Byrd record
that was called "Sounds of Brazil" or something like that. The
wonderful, brilliant, parrot on the album cover told me that new vistas
of guitar sounds and rhythms from the jungle were at hand and that my
life would never be the same. A few seconds after breathlessly placing
the needle to the vinyl it became apparent that my life would continue
on the same path and things were just the way it always was. Wipe out!
The music seemed to be so flat and lifeless.
Beats the heck out of me what's going on - the stuff seems simple
enough. Dyens is a master of time and will always play a note at the
exact correct time even though a lot of it is pretty off the wall. The
horrible truth is that if any non-Brazilian could do it, it would be
that Frenchman. Sacrebleu!
I went to Rio de Janeiro for a few weeks right after the Cuernavaca
Festival. Dyen's playing kept echoing in my ear the whole time I was
in Rio--and I heard plenty of samba there.

While in Cuernavaca I stood one evening in the small square outside
the concert hall watching some young guys doing capoeira, the
Brazilian combination dance and martial art. There was a kid playing
berimbau--the thing that looks like an archer's bow--making the
twanging sound. There were a couple of drummers, and maybe four girls
dancing samba to the capoeira beat. After a while the Mexican guy
standing next to me turned and said, "Those Brazilian girls really
know how to dance."

"Those aren't Brazilian girls," I replied.

"How do you know?" he asked.

"Do you know the American blues line," I switched to English, "Bend
your back like it ain't got no bone?"

He nodded.

"If you saw Brazilian girls dance samba, you would know what it
means."

One day on the Avenida Atlantica in Rio I ran into a big crowd on the
sidewalk that runs along Copacabana Besch. There was a P.A. and some
musicians. They were pretty good. In fact, they were excellent. There
were a half dozen really, really hot young girls in bikinis, dancing
barefoot samba like there was no tomorrow. Eventually the musicians
took a break and the girls started passing through the crowd. I
thought they must be passing the hat for tips. But when they got to me
I saw they were giving away CDs.

"What's the deal?" I asked the guy next to me.

"Oh. You may not know. The singer is very famous. He's gotten rich off
his music. He's from the neighborhood here, so once in a while he
comes and puts on a free show, gives away CDs to his old friends and
neighbors."

RNJ
dsi1
2011-04-20 09:57:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by Richard Jernigan
Post by dsi1
Post by Richard Jernigan
You might have to be born Brazilian to play that Brazilian rhythm.
At the 2000 Cuernavaca International Festival of the Guitar, Roland
Dyens played Baden's "Berimbau" and Tom Jobim's "A Felicidade". The
latter was the up-tempo samba version that the kid (the reincarnation
of Orfeu) plays at the end of the great movie "Orfeu Negro" [Black
Orpheus]. The next night Dyens and I happened to be walking out of the
concert hall at the same time.
I said to him, "Last night when you played 'Berimbau' I thought Baden
was going to come out of the guitar."
Dyens smiled in thanks.
"And I didn't know anyone but a Brazilian could play samba like you
played 'A Felicidade'."
Dyens smiled impishly and said, "Perhaps I was Brazilian in a former
life.."
RNJ
I'm pretty jaded about this, my history of disappointment being a long
one. I remember being really excited about getting a Charley Byrd record
that was called "Sounds of Brazil" or something like that. The
wonderful, brilliant, parrot on the album cover told me that new vistas
of guitar sounds and rhythms from the jungle were at hand and that my
life would never be the same. A few seconds after breathlessly placing
the needle to the vinyl it became apparent that my life would continue
on the same path and things were just the way it always was. Wipe out!
The music seemed to be so flat and lifeless.
Beats the heck out of me what's going on - the stuff seems simple
enough. Dyens is a master of time and will always play a note at the
exact correct time even though a lot of it is pretty off the wall. The
horrible truth is that if any non-Brazilian could do it, it would be
that Frenchman. Sacrebleu!
I went to Rio de Janeiro for a few weeks right after the Cuernavaca
Festival. Dyen's playing kept echoing in my ear the whole time I was
in Rio--and I heard plenty of samba there.
While in Cuernavaca I stood one evening in the small square outside
the concert hall watching some young guys doing capoeira, the
Brazilian combination dance and martial art. There was a kid playing
berimbau--the thing that looks like an archer's bow--making the
twanging sound. There were a couple of drummers, and maybe four girls
dancing samba to the capoeira beat. After a while the Mexican guy
standing next to me turned and said, "Those Brazilian girls really
know how to dance."
"Those aren't Brazilian girls," I replied.
"How do you know?" he asked.
"Do you know the American blues line," I switched to English, "Bend
your back like it ain't got no bone?"
He nodded.
"If you saw Brazilian girls dance samba, you would know what it
means."
One day on the Avenida Atlantica in Rio I ran into a big crowd on the
sidewalk that runs along Copacabana Besch. There was a P.A. and some
musicians. They were pretty good. In fact, they were excellent. There
were a half dozen really, really hot young girls in bikinis, dancing
barefoot samba like there was no tomorrow. Eventually the musicians
took a break and the girls started passing through the crowd. I
thought they must be passing the hat for tips. But when they got to me
I saw they were giving away CDs.
"What's the deal?" I asked the guy next to me.
"Oh. You may not know. The singer is very famous. He's gotten rich off
his music. He's from the neighborhood here, so once in a while he
comes and puts on a free show, gives away CDs to his old friends and
neighbors."
RNJ
Most of what I know about Rio is from the films "Black Orpheus" and
"City of God." Quite an amazing place with incredible poverty. I guess
the music springs out of a place like that because it's mostly free?
Thanks for the tale.
Richard Jernigan
2011-04-21 01:40:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by dsi1
Most of what I know about Rio is from the films "Black Orpheus" and
"City of God." Quite an amazing place with incredible poverty. I guess
the music springs out of a place like that because it's mostly free?
Thanks for the tale.
Rio runs the spectrum from the poor in the favelas, to propserous
middle class in neighborhoods like Botafogo and Flamengo, to quite
rich and fashionable in parts of the Zona Sul, along the Atlantic
coast. Some of the homeless live on the beaches.

Carnaval is the annual opportunity for the spectacular shows/parades
that the low income samba schools have been preparing all year to make
an international splash. The upscale beach neighborhood of Ipanama has
its own Banda de Ipanema, though they don't participate in the big
shows at the Sambodromo.

One evening I sat in Mab's on the Avenida Atlantica, a block from the
Meridien, happily consuming the "Seven Seas" seafood stew, the
excellent bread and salad, washed down by a frosty Antarctica from the
tap. In the next booth an American guy sat with his back to me. A
pretty strawberry blonde Brazilian young woman sat facing him, and me.
I surmised they were both attending the networking convention going on
at the time, since the guy was yammering on about fiber optic
backbones, pricing models, etc. etc. The woman was looking at him
quizzically. I thought she was probably thinking something like this:
"We're in Copacabana in Rio, not São Paolo, and you're going on about
this nerdy stuff. Rio is not about fiber optic backbones, it's about
the beach, soccer, music, money, sex!"

RNJ
dsi1
2011-04-21 02:46:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by Richard Jernigan
Post by dsi1
Most of what I know about Rio is from the films "Black Orpheus" and
"City of God." Quite an amazing place with incredible poverty. I guess
the music springs out of a place like that because it's mostly free?
Thanks for the tale.
Rio runs the spectrum from the poor in the favelas, to propserous
middle class in neighborhoods like Botafogo and Flamengo, to quite
rich and fashionable in parts of the Zona Sul, along the Atlantic
coast. Some of the homeless live on the beaches.
Carnaval is the annual opportunity for the spectacular shows/parades
that the low income samba schools have been preparing all year to make
an international splash. The upscale beach neighborhood of Ipanama has
its own Banda de Ipanema, though they don't participate in the big
shows at the Sambodromo.
One evening I sat in Mab's on the Avenida Atlantica, a block from the
Meridien, happily consuming the "Seven Seas" seafood stew, the
excellent bread and salad, washed down by a frosty Antarctica from the
tap. In the next booth an American guy sat with his back to me. A
pretty strawberry blonde Brazilian young woman sat facing him, and me.
I surmised they were both attending the networking convention going on
at the time, since the guy was yammering on about fiber optic
backbones, pricing models, etc. etc. The woman was looking at him
"We're in Copacabana in Rio, not São Paolo, and you're going on about
this nerdy stuff. Rio is not about fiber optic backbones, it's about
the beach, soccer, music, money, sex!"
What a goofball!
Post by Richard Jernigan
RNJ
JMF
2011-04-20 14:02:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by Richard Jernigan
You might have to be born Brazilian to play that Brazilian rhythm.
At the 2000 Cuernavaca International Festival of the Guitar, Roland
Dyens played Baden's "Berimbau" and Tom Jobim's "A Felicidade". The
latter was the up-tempo samba version that the kid (the reincarnation
of Orfeu) plays at the end of the great movie "Orfeu Negro" [Black
Orpheus].
That's a great story, and I agree that Dyens' version of Felicidades is
fantastic, but if you're talking about the very, very last thing the kid
played to end the movie, I'm pretty sure that was "the other one", Samba
de Orfeu.
Post by Richard Jernigan
The next night Dyens and I happened to be walking out of the
concert hall at the same time.
I said to him, "Last night when you played 'Berimbau' I thought Baden
was going to come out of the guitar."
Dyens smiled in thanks.
"And I didn't know anyone but a Brazilian could play samba like you
played 'A Felicidade'."
Dyens smiled impishly and said, "Perhaps I was Brazilian in a former
life.."
RNJ
Richard Jernigan
2011-04-20 19:01:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by JMF
That's a great story, and I agree that Dyens' version of Felicidades is
fantastic, but if you're talking about the very, very last thing the kid
played to end the movie, I'm pretty sure that was "the other one", Samba
de Orfeu.
I'm still unpacking from the move back to Austin. When I get to the
DVD of Orfeu Negro, I'll check it out.

RNJ
dsi1
2011-04-20 19:59:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by JMF
That's a great story, and I agree that Dyens' version of Felicidades is
fantastic, but if you're talking about the very, very last thing the kid
played to end the movie, I'm pretty sure that was "the other one", Samba
de Orfeu.
You're right about this



Jose Feliciano does a killer medley of Felicidade, Samba de Orfeu and
Manha de Carnaval. It's on his Alive Alive-O! album. This was one of my
favorite records when I was a kid.
l***@gmail.com
2020-07-15 10:20:32 UTC
Permalink
There are no fingering, until 59 it's ok.
At 60 the pb start, u are not in the arpeggio anymore, the patterns change, and i don't find out playable fingering, may be there are notes mistaken. In the video of B P he stays in the arpeggio.
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