Discussion:
cadences
(too old to reply)
sycochkn
2007-01-12 02:51:25 UTC
Permalink
I have an 8 measure piece.

| C / / / / | / / / / | G / / / | C / / / | / / / / | / / / / | G / / /
| C |

Am I correct in my assumption that the G in the third measure needs to
be in root inversion but I do not care what the highest note is and
that the C in the fourth measure is the same. The G in the seventh
measure needs to be in root form with the highest note either B or D
and that the C in the last measure needs to be in root inversion with C
as the highest note?

Bob
David Raleigh Arnold
2007-01-12 14:17:30 UTC
Permalink
Post by sycochkn
I have an 8 measure piece.
| C / / / / | / / / / | G / / / | C / / / | / / / / | / / / / | G / / / C
| |
Am I correct in my assumption that the G in the third measure needs to be
in root inversion
Root position.
Post by sycochkn
but I do not care what the highest note is
??
Post by sycochkn
and that the
C in the fourth measure is the same.
????

Try starting C/// C/e /// G/d /// C/....

Avoiding G / C/ keeps things moving in the middle. You see that all the
time in the work of experienced songwriters. There are many things you
might do for many reasons and many ways you might do them. daveA
--
Free download of technical exercises worth a lifetime of practice:
"Dynamic Guitar Technique": http://www.openguitar.com/instruction.html
You can play the cards you're dealt, or improve your hand with DGT.
To email go to: http://www.openguitar.com/contact.html
Steve Freides
2007-01-12 16:40:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by sycochkn
I have an 8 measure piece.
| C / / / / | / / / / | G / / / | C / / / | / / / / | / / / / | G / / /
| C |
Am I correct in my assumption that the G in the third measure needs to
be in root inversion but I do not care what the highest note is and
that the C in the fourth measure is the same. The G in the seventh
measure needs to be in root form with the highest note either B or D
and that the C in the last measure needs to be in root inversion with C
as the highest note?
The G in the third measure doesn't necessarily need to be in root
position, no. You have many possibilities. If the C in the first
measure and the fourth measure are both in root position, then either a
root position G chord or a first inversion G chord will work. If either
of the C chords is not in root position, then other things are possible.
The more usual way to discuss something like this is to give the melody
and discuss what might make the best harmony for it, assuming the melody
is decided already.

If you are trying to write a perfect, authentic cadence at the end then,
by definition, the bass will go G to C, and the melody will be either B
to C or D to C. If you're trying to create some other sort of cadence,
then different rules apply.

In short, exactly what's given and what's up to you is not clear from
your post.

HTH.

-S-
sycochkn
2007-01-12 19:40:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by Steve Freides
Post by sycochkn
I have an 8 measure piece.
| C / / / / | / / / / | G / / / | C / / / | / / / / | / / / / | G / / /
| C |
Am I correct in my assumption that the G in the third measure needs to
be in root inversion but I do not care what the highest note is and
that the C in the fourth measure is the same. The G in the seventh
measure needs to be in root form with the highest note either B or D
and that the C in the last measure needs to be in root inversion with C
as the highest note?
The G in the third measure doesn't necessarily need to be in root
position, no. You have many possibilities. If the C in the first
I am working on the basic application of scales chords arpeggios and
cadences as related to playing the guitar. I want to be able to do a
bit more than just play through composed pieces.


Bob
Post by Steve Freides
measure and the fourth measure are both in root position, then either a
root position G chord or a first inversion G chord will work. If either
of the C chords is not in root position, then other things are possible.
The more usual way to discuss something like this is to give the melody
and discuss what might make the best harmony for it, assuming the melody
is decided already.
If you are trying to write a perfect, authentic cadence at the end then,
by definition, the bass will go G to C, and the melody will be either B
to C or D to C. If you're trying to create some other sort of cadence,
then different rules apply.
In short, exactly what's given and what's up to you is not clear from
your post.
HTH.
-S-
Steve Freides
2007-01-13 18:16:38 UTC
Permalink
Post by sycochkn
Post by Steve Freides
Post by sycochkn
I have an 8 measure piece.
| C / / / / | / / / / | G / / / | C / / / | / / / / | / / / / | G /
/
/
| C |
Am I correct in my assumption that the G in the third measure needs to
be in root inversion but I do not care what the highest note is and
that the C in the fourth measure is the same. The G in the seventh
measure needs to be in root form with the highest note either B or D
and that the C in the last measure needs to be in root inversion
with
C
as the highest note?
The G in the third measure doesn't necessarily need to be in root
position, no. You have many possibilities. If the C in the first
I am working on the basic application of scales chords arpeggios and
cadences as related to playing the guitar. I want to be able to do a
bit more than just play through composed pieces.
Perhaps a good exercise is to look at some music and identify the
cadences - which are perfect authentic, which are authentic but not
perfect, which are neither, etc.

-S-
SleepyHead
2007-01-17 10:50:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by Steve Freides
Post by sycochkn
Post by Steve Freides
Post by sycochkn
I have an 8 measure piece.
| C / / / / | / / / / | G / / / | C / / / | / / / / | / / / / | G /
/
/
| C |
Am I correct in my assumption that the G in the third measure needs to
be in root inversion but I do not care what the highest note is and
that the C in the fourth measure is the same. The G in the seventh
measure needs to be in root form with the highest note either B or D
and that the C in the last measure needs to be in root inversion
with
C
as the highest note?
The G in the third measure doesn't necessarily need to be in root
position, no. You have many possibilities. If the C in the first
I am working on the basic application of scales chords arpeggios and
cadences as related to playing the guitar. I want to be able to do a
bit more than just play through composed pieces.
Perhaps a good exercise is to look at some music and identify the
cadences - which are perfect authentic, which are authentic but not
perfect, which are neither, etc.
-S-
I'll go with that, too. Chorale-tunes are a favourite of mine, but
anything with 3 or more voices should be unambiguous enough to get
started.
Steve Freides
2007-01-17 13:58:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by SleepyHead
Post by Steve Freides
Post by sycochkn
Post by Steve Freides
Post by sycochkn
I have an 8 measure piece.
| C / / / / | / / / / | G / / / | C / / / | / / / / | / / / / | G /
/
/
| C |
Am I correct in my assumption that the G in the third measure
needs
to
be in root inversion but I do not care what the highest note is and
that the C in the fourth measure is the same. The G in the seventh
measure needs to be in root form with the highest note either B
or
D
and that the C in the last measure needs to be in root inversion
with
C
as the highest note?
The G in the third measure doesn't necessarily need to be in root
position, no. You have many possibilities. If the C in the first
I am working on the basic application of scales chords arpeggios and
cadences as related to playing the guitar. I want to be able to do a
bit more than just play through composed pieces.
Perhaps a good exercise is to look at some music and identify the
cadences - which are perfect authentic, which are authentic but not
perfect, which are neither, etc.
-S-
I'll go with that, too. Chorale-tunes are a favourite of mine, but
anything with 3 or more voices should be unambiguous enough to get
started.
Yes - Bach chorales can be thick, but your basic Episcopal, Lutheran,
etc, hymnal is great for this sort of thing. Also, excellent for this
is early Baroque music from German - Schutz, Schein, and that crowd from
the early 1600's, roughly 100 years before Bach - lots of block chords.

-S-
SleepyHead
2007-01-17 14:28:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by Steve Freides
Post by SleepyHead
Post by Steve Freides
Post by sycochkn
Post by Steve Freides
Post by sycochkn
I have an 8 measure piece.
| C / / / / | / / / / | G / / / | C / / / | / / / / | / / / / | G /
/
/
| C |
Am I correct in my assumption that the G in the third measure
needs
to
be in root inversion but I do not care what the highest note is and
that the C in the fourth measure is the same. The G in the seventh
measure needs to be in root form with the highest note either B
or
D
and that the C in the last measure needs to be in root inversion
with
C
as the highest note?
The G in the third measure doesn't necessarily need to be in root
position, no. You have many possibilities. If the C in the first
I am working on the basic application of scales chords arpeggios and
cadences as related to playing the guitar. I want to be able to do a
bit more than just play through composed pieces.
Perhaps a good exercise is to look at some music and identify the
cadences - which are perfect authentic, which are authentic but not
perfect, which are neither, etc.
-S-
I'll go with that, too. Chorale-tunes are a favourite of mine, but
anything with 3 or more voices should be unambiguous enough to get
started.
Yes - Bach chorales can be thick, but your basic Episcopal, Lutheran,
etc, hymnal is great for this sort of thing. Also, excellent for this
is early Baroque music from German - Schutz, Schein, and that crowd from
the early 1600's, roughly 100 years before Bach - lots of block chords.
One thing I forgot to mention is that if you're looking at a Bach
chorale (or similar) it's probably best just to analyse those chords
that fall on the beat - the rest of the notes are often just 'filler'.
Post by Steve Freides
-S-
Steve Freides
2007-01-17 16:03:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by SleepyHead
Post by Steve Freides
Post by SleepyHead
Post by Steve Freides
Post by sycochkn
Post by Steve Freides
Post by sycochkn
I have an 8 measure piece.
| C / / / / | / / / / | G / / / | C / / / | / / / / | / / / /
|
G /
/
/
| C |
Am I correct in my assumption that the G in the third measure
needs
to
be in root inversion but I do not care what the highest note
is
and
that the C in the fourth measure is the same. The G in the seventh
measure needs to be in root form with the highest note either B
or
D
and that the C in the last measure needs to be in root inversion
with
C
as the highest note?
The G in the third measure doesn't necessarily need to be in root
position, no. You have many possibilities. If the C in the first
I am working on the basic application of scales chords arpeggios and
cadences as related to playing the guitar. I want to be able to
do
a
bit more than just play through composed pieces.
Perhaps a good exercise is to look at some music and identify the
cadences - which are perfect authentic, which are authentic but not
perfect, which are neither, etc.
-S-
I'll go with that, too. Chorale-tunes are a favourite of mine, but
anything with 3 or more voices should be unambiguous enough to get
started.
Yes - Bach chorales can be thick, but your basic Episcopal, Lutheran,
etc, hymnal is great for this sort of thing. Also, excellent for this
is early Baroque music from German - Schutz, Schein, and that crowd from
the early 1600's, roughly 100 years before Bach - lots of block chords.
One thing I forgot to mention is that if you're looking at a Bach
chorale (or similar) it's probably best just to analyse those chords
that fall on the beat - the rest of the notes are often just 'filler'.
Well, kinda, sorta, maybe. There are many examples where the important
note is not on the beat for voice-leading reasons. I'd just stick to
simpler chorales, be they the simpler Bach ones or those of other
composers, until such time as one is ready for something more complex,
IOW, better to do an accurate analysis of something relatively simple
than a wrong analysis of something complex. Just my opinion, of course.
Post by SleepyHead
Post by Steve Freides
-S-
David Raleigh Arnold
2007-01-14 11:06:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by sycochkn
Post by Steve Freides
Post by sycochkn
I have an 8 measure piece.
| C / / / / | / / / / | G / / / | C / / / | / / / / | / / / / | G / / /
| C |
Am I correct in my assumption that the G in the third measure needs to
be in root inversion but I do not care what the highest note is and
that the C in the fourth measure is the same. The G in the seventh
measure needs to be in root form with the highest note either B or D
and that the C in the last measure needs to be in root inversion with C
as the highest note?
The G in the third measure doesn't necessarily need to be in root
position, no. You have many possibilities. If the C in the first
I am working on the basic application of scales chords arpeggios and
cadences as related to playing the guitar. I want to be able to do a bit
more than just play through composed pieces.
The path to originality is not perversity, it is persistence. Do not fail
to take advantage of the experience of others.

Don't worry about trying to sound like someone else, because you can't.
daveA
--
Free download of technical exercises worth a lifetime of practice:
"Dynamic Guitar Technique": http://www.openguitar.com/instruction.html
You can play the cards you're dealt, or improve your hand with DGT.
To email go to: http://www.openguitar.com/contact.html
sycochkn
2007-01-15 03:26:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by David Raleigh Arnold
Post by sycochkn
Post by Steve Freides
Post by sycochkn
I have an 8 measure piece.
| C / / / / | / / / / | G / / / | C / / / | / / / / | / / / / | G / / /
| C |
Am I correct in my assumption that the G in the third measure needs to
be in root inversion but I do not care what the highest note is and
that the C in the fourth measure is the same. The G in the seventh
measure needs to be in root form with the highest note either B or