Discussion:
Building a Better Right Hand: End of January Report & Audio Sample
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a***@yahoo.com
2011-01-30 11:46:34 UTC
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http://betterrighthand.blogspot.com/2011/01/end-of-january-progress-report.html

Tom Poore
South Euclid, OH
USA
Miguel de Maria
2011-01-30 17:15:06 UTC
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http://betterrighthand.blogspot.com/2011/01/end-of-january-progress-r...
Tom Poore
South Euclid, OH
USA
Tom,
I'm following this project of your with interest. I say this
seriously, I think it will prove to be a valuable contribution here.
a***@yahoo.com
2011-01-30 22:14:41 UTC
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Permalink
I'm following this project of your with interest. I say this
seriously, I think it will prove to be a valuable contribution here.
I hope so. I could use the money.

Seriously, this is a no-lose situation for me. Even if I don't achieve
my goal, it'll certainly improve my right hand technique. But I hope I
succeed. When you consider how many people play classical guitar, a
surprisingly low portion of them can really do i and m alternation
well. So the guitar is stuck in a Catch-22 situation: those who can do
it, can't describe how to get it--those who could describe it, can't
do it. This is an oversimplification, of course. But we need people
who can do it, and are good at explaining how they got it. I'm good at
explaining things. Now I just need to be able to do it.

The obvious objection is that some just don't have what it takes. I'll
accept that if one is talking about the willingness to work for it.
Some people aren't willing to do the work, so they don't have what it
takes. Okay, granted. But if one says that some people will never get
it no matter how hard they work, then I don't buy it. At least not
yet. We assume too much when it comes to who has it and who hasn't.
The vast majority of us barely scratch our potential. To excel takes
time and commitment that few are willing to give. Certainly I've never
done it. So how do I really know that I don't have what it takes?

If there's a real ceiling up there that blocks me from further
progress, then I don't mind hitting it. But I do mind sitting on the
floor and not trying because I imagine there's a ceiling in my way.

Tom Poore
South Euclid, OH
USA
Carey
2011-01-30 23:56:35 UTC
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Permalink
Post by a***@yahoo.com
I'm following this project of your with interest. I say this
seriously, I think it will prove to be a valuable contribution here.
I hope so. I could use the money.
Seriously, this is a no-lose situation for me. Even if I don't achieve
my goal, it'll certainly improve my right hand technique. But I hope I
succeed. When you consider how many people play classical guitar, a
surprisingly low portion of them can really do i and m alternation
well. So the guitar is stuck in a Catch-22 situation: those who can do
it, can't describe how to get it--those who could describe it, can't
do it. This is an oversimplification, of course. But we need people
who can do it, and are good at explaining how they got it. I'm good at
explaining things. Now I just need to be able to do it.
The obvious objection is that some just don't have what it takes. I'll
accept that if one is talking about the willingness to work for it.
Some people aren't willing to do the work, so they don't have what it
takes. Okay, granted. But if one says that some people will never get
it no matter how hard they work, then I don't buy it. At least not
yet. We assume too much when it comes to who has it and who hasn't.
The vast majority of us barely scratch our potential. To excel takes
time and commitment that few are willing to give. Certainly I've never
done it. So how do I really know that I don't have what it takes?
If there's a real ceiling up there that blocks me from further
progress, then I don't mind hitting it. But I do mind sitting on the
floor and not trying because I imagine there's a ceiling in my way.
Tom Poore
South Euclid, OH
USA
Good to read that penultimate paragraph, having just made two
large mistakes on the guitar I'm working on. Press on regardless,
but with care and attention, is my mantra now.
Miguel de Maria
2011-01-31 03:30:06 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by a***@yahoo.com
I'm following this project of your with interest. I say this
seriously, I think it will prove to be a valuable contribution here.
I hope so. I could use the money.
Seriously, this is a no-lose situation for me. Even if I don't achieve
my goal, it'll certainly improve my right hand technique. But I hope I
succeed. When you consider how many people play classical guitar, a
surprisingly low portion of them can really do i and m alternation
well. So the guitar is stuck in a Catch-22 situation: those who can do
it, can't describe how to get it--those who could describe it, can't
do it. This is an oversimplification, of course. But we need people
who can do it, and are good at explaining how they got it. I'm good at
explaining things. Now I just need to be able to do it.
The obvious objection is that some just don't have what it takes. I'll
accept that if one is talking about the willingness to work for it.
Some people aren't willing to do the work, so they don't have what it
takes. Okay, granted. But if one says that some people will never get
it no matter how hard they work, then I don't buy it. At least not
yet. We assume too much when it comes to who has it and who hasn't.
The vast majority of us barely scratch our potential. To excel takes
time and commitment that few are willing to give. Certainly I've never
done it. So how do I really know that I don't have what it takes?
If there's a real ceiling up there that blocks me from further
progress, then I don't mind hitting it. But I do mind sitting on the
floor and not trying because I imagine there's a ceiling in my way.
Tom Poore
South Euclid, OH
USA
Tom,
it is also my opinion that there is nothing physical stopping you (or
students) from reaching your goals. I believe there are mental
barriers which we must overcome, some of which can be quite high, and
even worse, invisible. This fellow, Miguel Rodriguez, gave me a clue
at a gig we did last June.


Check out 0:36 or so. He told me, "I'm good because of the kind of
person I am." I interpreted this as meaning that the difference
between good and not-good players was in their fundamental approaches
to the materials. When you said that you tend to hit the soda machine
too hard, that, to me, is kind of what he was talking about. Maybe
why we hit the soda machine too hard is what we should be trying to
examine! It has often been bandied about that the good rest-stroke
players are evident from about the very start. That's an aggressively
depressing thought to any non-good rest-stroke player. But it might
also indicate that it is an element in the fundamental approach,
rather than raw volume of work, that is the difference.
a***@yahoo.com
2011-01-31 15:04:12 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Miguel de Maria
It has often been bandied about that the good
rest-stroke players are evident from about the
very start. That's an aggressively depressing
thought to any non-good rest-stroke player. But
it might also indicate that it is an element in the
fundamental approach, rather than raw volume
of work, that is the difference.
I agree. It's far too easy to waste time banging one's head into the
same section of wall. If one takes a few steps to the right or left,
then maybe the different section of wall won't be so hard to break
down.

Tom Poore
South Euclid, OH
USA
Christian Breton
2011-02-03 15:33:47 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by a***@yahoo.com
Post by Miguel de Maria
It has often been bandied about that the good
rest-stroke players are evident from about the
very start. That's an aggressively depressing
thought to any non-good rest-stroke player. But
it might also indicate that it is an element in the
fundamental approach, rather than raw volume
of work, that is the difference.
I agree. It's far too easy to waste time banging one's head into the
same section of wall. If one takes a few steps to the right or left,
then maybe the different section of wall won't be so hard to break
down.
Tom Poore
South Euclid, OH
USA
Yes. There is a time when tricks won´t help you further on,
and it is only an aproach of the whole person what get´s
you further on. For me, the most important thing is to take
the time regulary, and check everything at the base, beside
the normal practice. Other players will have other ways,
depending on their person.

Chris
JPD
2011-02-03 16:24:12 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by a***@yahoo.com
Post by Miguel de Maria
It has often been bandied about that the good
rest-stroke players are evident from about the
very start. That's an aggressively depressing
thought to any non-good rest-stroke player.  But
it might also indicate that it is an element in the
fundamental approach, rather than raw volume
of work, that is the difference.
I agree. It's far too easy to waste time banging one's head into the
same section of wall. If one takes a few steps to the right or left,
then maybe the different section of wall won't be so hard to break
down.
Tom Poore
South Euclid, OH
USA
Sometimes you'll see a fly buzzing against a window pane, banging
against the glass, trying to get out. Just a few inches away the
window is open, but the fly just keeps banging away.

I'm pretty sure we do the same. Answers are right next to us, but we
just keep banging away at the invisible barrier.
Matt Faunce
2011-02-04 02:10:17 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Miguel de Maria
This fellow, Miguel Rodriguez, gave me a clue
at a gig we did last June. http://youtu.be/Z1rDZiV9bSg
Miguel, I'm wondering if this Miguel Rodriguez is the same guy I used
to talk to back in 1992 or so. I just knew him as Miguel. Did he used
to teach a little bit at the guitar shop Miguel Bernal used to own, in
Tempe on University Ave? And also play at Pepin? If so, this was the
guy who blew my mind wide open to fire in flamenco. Damn! Gives me
chills just thinking about it.
Post by Miguel de Maria
Check out 0:36 or so.  He told me, "I'm good because of the kind of
person I am."  I interpreted this as meaning that the difference
between good and not-good players was in their fundamental approaches
to the materials.  When you said that you tend to hit the soda machine
too hard, that, to me, is kind of what he was talking about.
That must be the same guy. Very insightful person. Great player.

I went back to AZ several years later and asked Miguel Bernal where
Miguel the flamenco player was and Mr. Bernal said Miguel just went
his way somewhere, like a gypsy, he thought it was Texas. He became
this legend to me and a few others who knew him.

Matt
Miguel de Maria
2011-02-04 02:54:06 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Matt Faunce
Post by Miguel de Maria
This fellow, Miguel Rodriguez, gave me a clue
at a gig we did last June. http://youtu.be/Z1rDZiV9bSg
Miguel, I'm wondering if this Miguel Rodriguez is the same guy I used
to talk to back in 1992 or so. I just knew him as Miguel. Did he used
to teach a little bit at the guitar shop Miguel Bernal used to own, in
Tempe on University Ave? And also play at Pepin? If so, this was the
guy who blew my mind wide open to fire in flamenco. Damn! Gives me
chills just thinking about it.
Post by Miguel de Maria
Check out 0:36 or so.  He told me, "I'm good because of the kind of
person I am."  I interpreted this as meaning that the difference
between good and not-good players was in their fundamental approaches
to the materials.  When you said that you tend to hit the soda machine
too hard, that, to me, is kind of what he was talking about.
That must be the same guy. Very insightful person. Great player.
I went back to AZ several years later and asked Miguel Bernal where
Miguel the flamenco player was and Mr. Bernal said Miguel just went
his way somewhere, like a gypsy, he thought it was Texas. He became
this legend to me and a few others who knew him.
Matt
Matt,
small fing world! I didn't know you had AZ roots! Yeah, it must be
the same person. He is an incredible player of flamenco and classical
as well. I was playing with a pick when I met him and we formed a
trio and made me throw away the pick. We still play gigs
occasionally, and keep planning on putting something cool together.
He is from Texas, but has toured, and played for Maria Benitez for
awhile. Incidentally, I recently picked up a bunch of editions for a
quarter each at the Tempe library that were originally sold at
Bernal's. I think Bernal is RIP, btw.
Matt Faunce
2011-02-04 18:01:02 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Matt Faunce
Post by Miguel de Maria
This fellow, Miguel Rodriguez, gave me a clue
at a gig we did last June. http://youtu.be/Z1rDZiV9bSg
Miguel, I'm wondering if this Miguel Rodriguez is the same guy I used
to talk to back in 1992 or so. I just knew him as Miguel. Did he used
to teach a little bit at the guitar shop Miguel Bernal used to own, in
Tempe on University Ave? And also play at Pepin? If so, this was the
guy who blew my mind wide open to fire in flamenco. Damn! Gives me
chills just thinking about it.
Post by Miguel de Maria
Check out 0:36 or so.  He told me, "I'm good because of the kind of
person I am."  I interpreted this as meaning that the difference
between good and not-good players was in their fundamental approaches
to the materials.  When you said that you tend to hit the soda machine
too hard, that, to me, is kind of what he was talking about.
That must be the same guy. Very insightful person. Great player.
I went back to AZ several years later and asked Miguel Bernal where
Miguel the flamenco player was and Mr. Bernal said Miguel just went
his way somewhere, like a gypsy, he thought it was Texas. He became
this legend to me and a few others who knew him.
Matt
Matt,
small fing world!  I didn't know you had AZ roots!  
Yup. I lived in Phoenix for nine months in 1992. Then I moved back to
AZ but to Flagstaff in '96 and stayed for five years. I did a lot of
playing in Sedona.
Yeah, it must be
the same person.  He is an incredible player of flamenco and classical
as well.  I was playing with a pick when I met him and we formed a
trio and made me throw away the pick.  We still play gigs
occasionally, and keep planning on putting something cool together.
He is from Texas, but has toured, and played for Maria Benitez for
awhile.  
The legend lives! :-) ... You're in good company!
Incidentally, I recently picked up a bunch of editions for a
quarter each at the Tempe library that were originally sold at
Bernal's.  I think Bernal is RIP, btw.- Hide quoted text -
That's sad. Miguel Bernal was a very likable guy--very easy to get
along with. He loved life, music, and culture. If I remember correctly
he also loved classic cars. Every time I see that T.V. ad for ABC
Warehouse where the prez walks out to his classic car I think of Mr.
Bernal. Great guy. I'm sure he's missed by many.

Matt
c***@gmail.com
2020-01-28 22:25:47 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Matt Faunce
Hello guys, yes I was a friend and student of Miguel Bernal back in '71 and I bought my first Ramirez Classical Guitar there and learned so much from him. He did like classic cars such as his 50's T-Bird. We traveled to Los Angeles to a Segovia Concert. Great guy and friend. He is RIP. I think back in early 2ooo's
Cheers
Post by Matt Faunce
Post by Matt Faunce
Post by Miguel de Maria
This fellow, Miguel Rodriguez, gave me a clue
at a gig we did last June. http://youtu.be/Z1rDZiV9bSg
Miguel, I'm wondering if this Miguel Rodriguez is the same guy I used
to talk to back in 1992 or so. I just knew him as Miguel. Did he used
to teach a little bit at the guitar shop Miguel Bernal used to own, in
Tempe on University Ave? And also play at Pepin? If so, this was the
guy who blew my mind wide open to fire in flamenco. Damn! Gives me
chills just thinking about it.
Post by Miguel de Maria
Check out 0:36 or so.  He told me, "I'm good because of the kind of
person I am."  I interpreted this as meaning that the difference
between good and not-good players was in their fundamental approaches
to the materials.  When you said that you tend to hit the soda machine
too hard, that, to me, is kind of what he was talking about.
That must be the same guy. Very insightful person. Great player.
I went back to AZ several years later and asked Miguel Bernal where
Miguel the flamenco player was and Mr. Bernal said Miguel just went
his way somewhere, like a gypsy, he thought it was Texas. He became
this legend to me and a few others who knew him.
Matt
Matt,
small fing world!  I didn't know you had AZ roots!  
Yup. I lived in Phoenix for nine months in 1992. Then I moved back to
AZ but to Flagstaff in '96 and stayed for five years. I did a lot of
playing in Sedona.
Yeah, it must be
the same person.  He is an incredible player of flamenco and classical
as well.  I was playing with a pick when I met him and we formed a
trio and made me throw away the pick.  We still play gigs
occasionally, and keep planning on putting something cool together.
He is from Texas, but has toured, and played for Maria Benitez for
awhile.  
The legend lives! :-) ... You're in good company!
Incidentally, I recently picked up a bunch of editions for a
quarter each at the Tempe library that were originally sold at
Bernal's.  I think Bernal is RIP, btw.- Hide quoted text -
That's sad. Miguel Bernal was a very likable guy--very easy to get
along with. He loved life, music, and culture. If I remember correctly
he also loved classic cars. Every time I see that T.V. ad for ABC
Warehouse where the prez walks out to his classic car I think of Mr.
Bernal. Great guy. I'm sure he's missed by many.
Matt
l***@novabbs.i2p
2020-01-29 18:02:53 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Matt how are you?
I like your profile. My name is Carolina.
Can we get to know each other?
Would be glad if you reply me.
You can write to my private email: mailto:***@yahoo.com
Thank you.
dsi1
2020-01-30 16:22:29 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Miguel de Maria
Post by a***@yahoo.com
I'm following this project of your with interest. I say this
seriously, I think it will prove to be a valuable contribution here.
I hope so. I could use the money.
Seriously, this is a no-lose situation for me. Even if I don't achieve
my goal, it'll certainly improve my right hand technique. But I hope I
succeed. When you consider how many people play classical guitar, a
surprisingly low portion of them can really do i and m alternation
well. So the guitar is stuck in a Catch-22 situation: those who can do
it, can't describe how to get it--those who could describe it, can't
do it. This is an oversimplification, of course. But we need people
who can do it, and are good at explaining how they got it. I'm good at
explaining things. Now I just need to be able to do it.
The obvious objection is that some just don't have what it takes. I'll
accept that if one is talking about the willingness to work for it.
Some people aren't willing to do the work, so they don't have what it
takes. Okay, granted. But if one says that some people will never get
it no matter how hard they work, then I don't buy it. At least not
yet. We assume too much when it comes to who has it and who hasn't.
The vast majority of us barely scratch our potential. To excel takes
time and commitment that few are willing to give. Certainly I've never
done it. So how do I really know that I don't have what it takes?
If there's a real ceiling up there that blocks me from further
progress, then I don't mind hitting it. But I do mind sitting on the
floor and not trying because I imagine there's a ceiling in my way.
Tom Poore
South Euclid, OH
USA
Tom,
it is also my opinion that there is nothing physical stopping you (or
students) from reaching your goals. I believe there are mental
barriers which we must overcome, some of which can be quite high, and
even worse, invisible. This fellow, Miguel Rodriguez, gave me a clue
at a gig we did last June. http://youtu.be/Z1rDZiV9bSg
Check out 0:36 or so. He told me, "I'm good because of the kind of
person I am." I interpreted this as meaning that the difference
between good and not-good players was in their fundamental approaches
to the materials. When you said that you tend to hit the soda machine
too hard, that, to me, is kind of what he was talking about. Maybe
why we hit the soda machine too hard is what we should be trying to
examine! It has often been bandied about that the good rest-stroke
players are evident from about the very start. That's an aggressively
depressing thought to any non-good rest-stroke player. But it might
also indicate that it is an element in the fundamental approach,
rather than raw volume of work, that is the difference.
We're all built differently. Our musculoskeletal system and our neurological system are all unique. Our brains and the way we perceive reality are unique. The way we express ourselves is unique. The culture and music we grow up with are certainly different from most others on this planet. My guess is that the best musicians will just fall into the styles and techniques they're meant to. They'll just flow into it. OTOH, most people that play the guitar are trying to be something they're not. Why is that? I don't know.
Richard Jernigan
2020-01-30 02:21:12 UTC
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Permalink
Post by a***@yahoo.com
http://betterrighthand.blogspot.com/2011/01/end-of-january-progress-report.html
Tom Poore
South Euclid, OH
USA
Hi Tom-

When I click the audio report my browser just displays "unsupported plugin," but it doesn't say which plugin it's objecting to. Could you give me a tip on how to access your audio report?

Thanks,

RNJ
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