Discussion:
A Concert, and Picnic
(too old to reply)
Andrew Schulman
2012-11-20 02:21:52 UTC
Permalink
On Tuesday, November 27th, I'll be doing the 3rd of a series of 4
concerts since last March 20th at 2nd Floor On Clinton, an intimate
music salon setting on Manhattan's Lower East Side:

http://events.r20.constantcontact.com/register/event?oeidk=a07e6ei571kc163804d&llr=yhzk8odab

The first concert, a "Bach Celebration" (half the program was Bach),
was also a celebration of the recovery of my music memory, and ability
to memorize new pieces, after serious medical issues. The venue owner
and I decided to do the series after the first one turned out well. I
then played there last June, music that I had previously memorized and
then re-learned, and this concert will be mostly music I'd never
played from memory before. I'll finish the series next March 19th with
an all-Bach concert, also including pieces I had never memorized
previously.

What I have found out is that if you've had a recovery from brain
damage it's still "use it or lose it". If you do the hard work you
can wind up with better skills than you had before.

Also, in the subject heading above, not "a picnic", but rather,
Picnic. I wrote here last August that a steady gig I'd had for 2
years at a French bistro called Alouette, a short walk from where I
live on the Upper West Side, had ended because Alouette closed. I was
hoping to find another place nearby, this is a great neighborhood for
music, and I did.

I will be starting this Friday at http://www.picnicmarket.com/ The
chef proprietaire, Jean-Luc Kieffer, wants to try live music and we'll
do a trial run and if works well it will be a steady gig. This
Friday, the night after Thanksgiving, will be slow but that will give
us a chance to get the set-up right.

For those of you that came to hear me at Alouette I can tell you that
Jean-Luc is a great chef. Those of you that live far away, if you
know people in New York that would like to hear guitar music in a nice
French bistro, please pass the word!

Thanks,

Andrew
http://www.abacaproductions.com/
John Nguyen
2012-11-20 14:58:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by Andrew Schulman
On Tuesday, November 27th, I'll be doing the 3rd of a series of 4
concerts since last March 20th at 2nd Floor On Clinton, an intimate
http://events.r20.constantcontact.com/register/event?oeidk=a07e6ei571...
The first concert, a "Bach Celebration" (half the program was Bach),
was also a celebration of the recovery of my music memory, and ability
to memorize new pieces, after serious medical issues.  The venue owner
and I decided to do the series after the first one turned out well.  I
then played there last June, music that I had previously memorized and
then re-learned, and this concert will be mostly music I'd never
played from memory before. I'll finish the series next March 19th with
an all-Bach concert, also including pieces I had never memorized
previously.
What I have found out is that if you've had a recovery from brain
damage it's still "use it or lose it".  If you do the hard work you
can wind up with better skills than you had before.
Also, in the subject heading above, not "a picnic", but rather,
Picnic.  I wrote here last August that a steady gig I'd had for 2
years at a French bistro called Alouette, a short walk from where I
live on the Upper West Side, had ended because Alouette closed.  I was
hoping to find another place nearby, this is a great neighborhood for
music, and I did.
I will be starting this Friday athttp://www.picnicmarket.com/ The
chef proprietaire, Jean-Luc Kieffer, wants to try live music and we'll
do a trial run and if works well it will be a steady gig.  This
Friday, the night after Thanksgiving, will be slow but that will give
us a chance to get the set-up right.
For those of you that came to hear me at Alouette I can tell you that
Jean-Luc is a great chef.  Those of you that live far away, if you
know people in New York that would like to hear guitar music in a nice
French bistro, please pass the word!
Thanks,
Andrewhttp://www.abacaproductions.com/
Break a leg, mi amigo!
Andrew Schulman
2012-11-20 16:44:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by John Nguyen
Break a leg, mi amigo!
Thanks, John!

Andrew
Richard Jernigan
2012-11-20 16:57:49 UTC
Permalink
HI Andrew-

Congratulations on another neighborhood gig. We really enjoyed seeing/hearing you at Alouette. Next time we're in New York we'll drop by the new place.

We're off to Thailand after Christmas--palm trees, white sand, a little diving, delicious food, a bit of culture in Bangkok and Chiang Mai....

It's an inspiration to see someone like you soldiering on with a smile and overcoming a serious setback. I'll always remember the smile on your face that night at Alouette when you played the Bachianas Brasileiras from memory for the first time!

RNJ
Andrew Schulman
2012-11-20 17:32:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by Richard Jernigan
HI Andrew-
Congratulations on another neighborhood gig. We really enjoyed seeing/hearing you at Alouette. Next time we're in New York we'll drop by the new place.
We're off to Thailand after Christmas--palm trees, white sand, a little diving, delicious food, a bit of culture in Bangkok and Chiang Mai....
It's an inspiration to see someone like you soldiering on with a smile and overcoming a serious setback. I'll always remember the smile on your face that night at Alouette when you played the Bachianas Brasileiras from memory for the first time!
RNJ
Thanks Richard, much appreciated. And all best wishes for a great
trip to Thailand!

Andrew
Alan Turing
2012-11-20 19:19:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by Andrew Schulman
On Tuesday, November 27th, I'll be doing the 3rd of a series of 4
concerts since last March 20th at 2nd Floor On Clinton, an intimate
http://events.r20.constantcontact.com/register/event?oeidk=a07e6ei571kc163804d&llr=yhzk8odab
The first concert, a "Bach Celebration" (half the program was Bach),
was also a celebration of the recovery of my music memory, and ability
to memorize new pieces, after serious medical issues. The venue owner
and I decided to do the series after the first one turned out well. I
then played there last June, music that I had previously memorized and
then re-learned, and this concert will be mostly music I'd never
played from memory before. I'll finish the series next March 19th with
an all-Bach concert, also including pieces I had never memorized
previously.
What I have found out is that if you've had a recovery from brain
damage it's still "use it or lose it". If you do the hard work you
can wind up with better skills than you had before.
Also, in the subject heading above, not "a picnic", but rather,
Picnic. I wrote here last August that a steady gig I'd had for 2
years at a French bistro called Alouette, a short walk from where I
live on the Upper West Side, had ended because Alouette closed. I was
hoping to find another place nearby, this is a great neighborhood for
music, and I did.
I will be starting this Friday at http://www.picnicmarket.com/ The
chef proprietaire, Jean-Luc Kieffer, wants to try live music and we'll
do a trial run and if works well it will be a steady gig. This
Friday, the night after Thanksgiving, will be slow but that will give
us a chance to get the set-up right.
For those of you that came to hear me at Alouette I can tell you that
Jean-Luc is a great chef. Those of you that live far away, if you
know people in New York that would like to hear guitar music in a nice
French bistro, please pass the word!
Thanks,
Andrew
http://www.abacaproductions.com/
Unforunately my thanksgiving ends on the monday before that 27th, but
if it was still i would have been there 100%. Hope it goes well, i
would have loved to hear the Venezuelan waltz and Manha de Carnival as
well as the debussy!
--
-AlanTuring
Andrew Schulman
2012-11-20 20:11:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by Alan Turing
Unforunately my thanksgiving ends on the monday before that 27th, but
if it was still i would have been there 100%. Hope it goes well, i
would have loved to hear the Venezuelan waltz and Manha de Carnival  as
well as the debussy!
Thanks, hope to see you someday, try Picnic on a Friday night next
time you are here.

And yes, those are great pieces. The Debussy is ideal for 8-string
guitar, especially.

Andrew
Alan Turing
2012-11-20 21:28:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by Andrew Schulman
Post by Alan Turing
Unforunately my thanksgiving ends on the monday before that 27th, but
if it was still i would have been there 100%. Hope it goes well, i
would have loved to hear the Venezuelan waltz and Manha de Carnival  as
well as the debussy!
Thanks, hope to see you someday, try Picnic on a Friday night next
time you are here.
And yes, those are great pieces. The Debussy is ideal for 8-string
guitar, especially.
Andrew
Oh lord, i just actually read the 8 string part. That makes me feel
worse. Will the event be recorded on video?
--
-AlanTuring
Andrew Schulman
2012-11-21 03:26:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by Alan Turing
Oh lord, i just actually read the 8 string part. That makes me feel
worse. Will the event be recorded on video?
--
-AlanTuring
I probably won't record the concert. I have just finished adding
these back to memory. Maybe next year.

Andrew
Nate Najar
2012-11-22 19:48:22 UTC
Permalink
Post by Andrew Schulman
On Tuesday, November 27th, I'll be doing the 3rd of a series of 4
concerts since last March 20th at 2nd Floor On Clinton, an intimate
http://events.r20.constantcontact.com/register/event?oeidk=a07e6ei571kc163804d&llr=yhzk8odab
The first concert, a "Bach Celebration" (half the program was Bach),
was also a celebration of the recovery of my music memory, and ability
to memorize new pieces, after serious medical issues. The venue owner
and I decided to do the series after the first one turned out well. I
then played there last June, music that I had previously memorized and
then re-learned, and this concert will be mostly music I'd never
played from memory before. I'll finish the series next March 19th with
an all-Bach concert, also including pieces I had never memorized
previously.
What I have found out is that if you've had a recovery from brain
damage it's still "use it or lose it". If you do the hard work you
can wind up with better skills than you had before.
Also, in the subject heading above, not "a picnic", but rather,
Picnic. I wrote here last August that a steady gig I'd had for 2
years at a French bistro called Alouette, a short walk from where I
live on the Upper West Side, had ended because Alouette closed. I was
hoping to find another place nearby, this is a great neighborhood for
music, and I did.
I will be starting this Friday at http://www.picnicmarket.com/ The
chef proprietaire, Jean-Luc Kieffer, wants to try live music and we'll
do a trial run and if works well it will be a steady gig. This
Friday, the night after Thanksgiving, will be slow but that will give
us a chance to get the set-up right.
For those of you that came to hear me at Alouette I can tell you that
Jean-Luc is a great chef. Those of you that live far away, if you
know people in New York that would like to hear guitar music in a nice
French bistro, please pass the word!
Thanks,
Andrew
http://www.abacaproductions.com/
I am sure you are familiar with Pat Martino's story......

I wish I were in town to hear you next week, but I'll be in DC. I'll have to stop by the new restaurant next time I'm in town....

I heard you a number of years ago at the intercontinental barclay and really enjoyed it.

N
Andrew Schulman
2012-11-22 21:59:32 UTC
Permalink
Post by Nate Najar
I am sure you are familiar with Pat Martino's story......
I didn't, just looked it up. I have heard other stories, similar, and
there is a good percentage where the recovery actually gives you an
upgrade.
Post by Nate Najar
I wish I were in town to hear you next week, but I'll be in DC.  I'll have to stop by the new restaurant next time I'm in town....
I heard you a number of years ago at the intercontinental barclay and really enjoyed it.
Thanks Nate, I look forward to seeing you again!

Andrew
dsi1
2012-11-22 20:13:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by Andrew Schulman
On Tuesday, November 27th, I'll be doing the 3rd of a series of 4
concerts since last March 20th at 2nd Floor On Clinton, an intimate
http://events.r20.constantcontact.com/register/event?oeidk=a07e6ei571kc163804d&llr=yhzk8odab
The first concert, a "Bach Celebration" (half the program was Bach),
was also a celebration of the recovery of my music memory, and ability
to memorize new pieces, after serious medical issues. The venue owner
and I decided to do the series after the first one turned out well. I
then played there last June, music that I had previously memorized and
then re-learned, and this concert will be mostly music I'd never
played from memory before. I'll finish the series next March 19th with
an all-Bach concert, also including pieces I had never memorized
previously.
What I have found out is that if you've had a recovery from brain
damage it's still "use it or lose it". If you do the hard work you
can wind up with better skills than you had before.
Also, in the subject heading above, not "a picnic", but rather,
Picnic. I wrote here last August that a steady gig I'd had for 2
years at a French bistro called Alouette, a short walk from where I
live on the Upper West Side, had ended because Alouette closed. I was
hoping to find another place nearby, this is a great neighborhood for
music, and I did.
I will be starting this Friday at http://www.picnicmarket.com/ The
chef proprietaire, Jean-Luc Kieffer, wants to try live music and we'll
do a trial run and if works well it will be a steady gig. This
Friday, the night after Thanksgiving, will be slow but that will give
us a chance to get the set-up right.
For those of you that came to hear me at Alouette I can tell you that
Jean-Luc is a great chef. Those of you that live far away, if you
know people in New York that would like to hear guitar music in a nice
French bistro, please pass the word!
Thanks,
Andrew
http://www.abacaproductions.com/
I dreamt that I was in NYC and it occurred to me that I could finally go
watch you play but then I found myself in my bed in my room on this rock
in the middle of nowhere and I was sad. Still, it was a good dream.
Happy turkey day ya'all!
Gerry
2012-11-22 20:20:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by dsi1
I dreamt that I was in NYC and it occurred to me that I could finally
go watch you play but then I found myself in my bed in my room on this
rock in the middle of nowhere and I was sad. Still, it was a good
dream. Happy turkey day ya'all!
Better your rock in the middle of nowhere than a thousand others!
--
Music is the best means we have of digesting time. -- W. H. Auden
Andrew Schulman
2012-11-22 22:00:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by dsi1
I dreamt that I was in NYC and it occurred to me that I could finally go
watch you play but then I found myself in my bed in my room on this rock
in the middle of nowhere and I was sad. Still, it was a good dream.
Happy turkey day ya'all!
We should do one of those 2-week house swaps, I'd love to see Hawaii.

Happy T day too!

Andrew
John Nguyen
2012-11-30 05:04:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by Andrew Schulman
On Tuesday, November 27th, I'll be doing the 3rd of a series of 4
concerts since last March 20th at 2nd Floor On Clinton, an intimate
http://events.r20.constantcontact.com/register/event?oeidk=a07e6ei571...
The first concert, a "Bach Celebration" (half the program was Bach),
was also a celebration of the recovery of my music memory, and ability
to memorize new pieces, after serious medical issues.  The venue owner
and I decided to do the series after the first one turned out well.  I
then played there last June, music that I had previously memorized and
then re-learned, and this concert will be mostly music I'd never
played from memory before. I'll finish the series next March 19th with
an all-Bach concert, also including pieces I had never memorized
previously.
What I have found out is that if you've had a recovery from brain
damage it's still "use it or lose it".  If you do the hard work you
can wind up with better skills than you had before.
Also, in the subject heading above, not "a picnic", but rather,
Picnic.  I wrote here last August that a steady gig I'd had for 2
years at a French bistro called Alouette, a short walk from where I
live on the Upper West Side, had ended because Alouette closed.  I was
hoping to find another place nearby, this is a great neighborhood for
music, and I did.
I will be starting this Friday athttp://www.picnicmarket.com/ The
chef proprietaire, Jean-Luc Kieffer, wants to try live music and we'll
do a trial run and if works well it will be a steady gig.  This
Friday, the night after Thanksgiving, will be slow but that will give
us a chance to get the set-up right.
For those of you that came to hear me at Alouette I can tell you that
Jean-Luc is a great chef.  Those of you that live far away, if you
know people in New York that would like to hear guitar music in a nice
French bistro, please pass the word!
Thanks,
Andrewhttp://www.abacaproductions.com/
How was the concert, bro?
Andrew Schulman
2012-11-30 05:23:22 UTC
Permalink
Post by John Nguyen
How was the concert, bro?
Thanks for asking, friend! The truth is...my best playing yet. And
it felt to me, and several friends who were there, that I am now past
the recovery stage from the brain damage and on to the next step, the
new normal. One thing I notice in particular is that I can think
faster. This makes you more relaxed, and you hear better, and your
technique is better.

I will say again, I do NOT recommend two minutes of cardiac arrest as
a way to improve your playing. If that happens when you don't happen
to be on your way into an Intensive Care Unit, as I was, it may last
longer than two minutes. And if it's a good bit longer than that it's
not called cardiac arrest at some point...

Thanks again, John.

Andrew
Matt Faunce
2012-11-30 13:10:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by Andrew Schulman
Post by John Nguyen
How was the concert, bro?
Thanks for asking, friend! The truth is...my best playing yet. And
it felt to me, and several friends who were there, that I am now past
the recovery stage from the brain damage and on to the next step, the
new normal. One thing I notice in particular is that I can think
faster. This makes you more relaxed, and you hear better, and your
technique is better.
I will say again, I do NOT recommend two minutes of cardiac arrest as
a way to improve your playing. If that happens when you don't happen
to be on your way into an Intensive Care Unit, as I was, it may last
longer than two minutes. And if it's a good bit longer than that it's
not called cardiac arrest at some point...
Thanks again, John.
Andrew
That's great news Andrew. Glad to hear the concert went very well, and
you're making new gains. Really great news.
--
Matt
John Nguyen
2012-11-30 14:05:20 UTC
Permalink
Thanks for asking, friend!  The truth is...my best playing yet.  And
it felt to me, and several friends who were there, that I am now past
the recovery stage from the brain damage and on to the next step, the
new normal.  One thing I notice in particular is that I can think
faster.  This makes you more relaxed, and you hear better, and your
technique is better.
I will say again, I do NOT recommend two minutes of cardiac arrest as
a way to improve your playing.  If that happens when you don't happen
to be on your way into an Intensive Care Unit, as I was, it may last
longer than two minutes.  And if it's a good bit longer than that it's
not called cardiac arrest at some point...
Thanks again, John.
Andrew
That's very cool, Andrew! I have to come to your concert one of these
days. Please keep me posted with you performance schedule.
Cheers,

John
Andrew Schulman
2012-11-30 17:08:30 UTC
Permalink
Post by John Nguyen
That's very cool, Andrew! I have to come to your concert one of these
days. Please keep me posted with you performance schedule.
Cheers,
John and Matt,

Much appreciated. I thought my concert days were over but really they
are just beginning anew. My 4th and final concert at 2nd Floor On
Clinton, final at least for this series the owner and I devised, will
be on March 19th, all-Bach, or almost all, 2nd half will start with
the op. 3, #3 G major Vivaldi concerto that Bach had arranged for solo
keyboard. Here's the program:

Andrew Schulman, 8-String Guitar
Tuesday, March 19, 2013 7:30 PM
2nd Floor On Clinton
67 Clinton Street New York, NY
http://2ndflooronclinton.com/

Program:

Choral: Befiehl du deine Wege (Entrust Thy Way), BWV 244…J.S. Bach
(1685-1750)

Suite in D major (orig. 1st ‘Cello Suite), BWV 1007
Prelude
Allemande
Courante
Sarabande
Menuet I & II
Gigue

Sarabande (2nd Lute Suite), BWV 997

Bourrée (1st Lute Suite), BWV 996
Gigue

INTERMISSION

Concerto in G, Op. 3, #3…Antonio Vivaldi (1678-1741)
Allegro
Largo
Allegro

Prelude - Fugue - Allegro, BWV 998…J.S. Bach

Prelude BWV 999
Fugue (based on BWV 539 & 1001)
r***@gmail.com
2012-12-01 02:01:12 UTC
Permalink
This program is really "baroquen up" nicely.
Cactus Wren
2012-12-01 03:17:09 UTC
Permalink
Andrew,
I am sure glad to hear you are playing so well!

I can't help but have weird, Oliver Sachsian ideas going through my mind with all this. Why did you get better?? I wonder if there was some, hopefully unimportant and nonfunctional part of your brain that went dark, leaving more juice for the important (music-playing, of course) part.
Post by Andrew Schulman
Post by John Nguyen
That's very cool, Andrew! I have to come to your concert one of these
days. Please keep me posted with you performance schedule.
Cheers,
John and Matt,
Much appreciated. I thought my concert days were over but really they
are just beginning anew. My 4th and final concert at 2nd Floor On
Clinton, final at least for this series the owner and I devised, will
be on March 19th, all-Bach, or almost all, 2nd half will start with
the op. 3, #3 G major Vivaldi concerto that Bach had arranged for solo
Andrew Schulman, 8-String Guitar
Tuesday, March 19, 2013 7:30 PM
2nd Floor On Clinton
67 Clinton Street New York, NY
http://2ndflooronclinton.com/
Choral: Befiehl du deine Wege (Entrust Thy Way), BWV 244…J.S. Bach
(1685-1750)
Suite in D major (orig. 1st ‘Cello Suite), BWV 1007
Prelude
Allemande
Courante
Sarabande
Menuet I & II
Gigue
Sarabande (2nd Lute Suite), BWV 997
Bourrée (1st Lute Suite), BWV 996
Gigue
INTERMISSION
Concerto in G, Op. 3, #3…Antonio Vivaldi (1678-1741)
Allegro
Largo
Allegro
Prelude - Fugue - Allegro, BWV 998…J.S. Bach
Prelude BWV 999
Fugue (based on BWV 539 & 1001)
Andrew Schulman
2012-12-01 05:44:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by Cactus Wren
Andrew,
I am sure glad to hear you are playing so well!
I can't help but have weird, Oliver Sachsian ideas going through my mind with all this.  Why did you get better??  I wonder if there was some, hopefully unimportant and nonfunctional part of your brain that went dark, leaving more juice for the important (music-playing, of course) part.
CW, I think I described the situation in an earlier thread but the
following may answer your question. If anyone reading this is new
here I'll give a little background.

In July 2009, after major surgery which included a blood transfusion,
I went into anaphylactic shock, a reaction to the transfusion, and was
clinically dead for about 2 minutes, which meant no oxygen to the
brain for those two minutes. Brain damage usually begins at about 3
minutes but things can happen faster than that.

I realized a few days after I got home that there was damage. I lost
the memory of almost all my memorized music, many hours worth. I also
completely lost the ability to memorize music. I tried hard for 18
months to reactivate my memory abilities but no dice so I gave up on
that.

I never followed up with a neurologist, or did formal rehab. I just
figured the damage was permanent, and a lot of other things were going
on in my life then so I didn't pursue remedies. I could read, and I
could play, that was good enough. Figured I wouldn't do concerts ever
again.

I didn't know it at the time but I could play and read because my
brain had done what's called a workaround in the first few weeks after
the surgery. My head hurt that first month, and it was a huge effort
to play at all, but I was determined to get back to work.

In large part because within a few months I was playing 5 days a week
with fairly intense gigs, 3 days/week in the Surgical ICU where I'd
been a patient, and 2 days a week at a restaurant here in NY with a
very musical crowd, I was actually getting the ideal rehab. In
essence, after a little over 2 years the network for the music memory
repaired. A neurologist explained the situation when my memory
abilities returned and I realized my skills were better than before
(which was pretty darn freaky when it kicked in, I was like...WTF is
going on!!). The brain doesn't discard the workaround it created, it
blends it in to the repaired network. Computer analogy: I wound up
with a faster processor and more memory.

And your Oliver Sachsian ideas are not weird, you simply have ESP. I
got in touch with Oliver Sachs about this last year because I'm
writing a book, and he put me in touch with his music/brain consultant
of the past 25 years, Dr. Connie Tomaino. She will be part of the
chapter about this aspect of the story.

And, small world, Connie and I were both students at Stony Brook
University in the 1970's (I'm two years older). She got music therapy
started there by doing independent study projects, while I was getting
classical guitar started there the same way (my private teacher was
Jerry Willard who was eventually hired as the faculty teacher, Jerry
posts here now from time to time). Connie and I barely knew each
other, except one afternoon we talked for an hour in the music
building, with her telling me about this fairly new thing called music
therapy and me telling her about classical guitar. When we spoke
next, last year, we both remembered that conversation.

Andrew
Slogoin
2012-12-01 06:19:50 UTC
Permalink
I got in touch with Oliver Sachs about this last year because I'm writing a book
Oh my, good luck... first book, right? You are the only other
musician who I know of who went through something similar to what I
did. Have you found any others? I look forward to reading it.
Andrew Schulman
2012-12-01 18:06:13 UTC
Permalink
 I got in touch with Oliver Sachs about this last year because I'm writing a book
    Oh my, good luck... first book, right? You are the only other
musician who I know of who went through something similar to what I
did. Have you found any others? I look forward to reading it.
Yes, it's a first book, but I've done a little writing before, and
some has been published. I wrote the Afterword to Richard Dyer-
Bennet's biography (he was my mentor), and years ago some reviews,
etc.

I've been working on the book for almost 2 years, starting with a
journal I kept in the first 6 months of my playing in the SICU at Beth
Israel Medical Center. Haven't mentioned it publicly until now, but
things have progressed significantly so I'm comfortable talking about
it. It will still be a while before it is published, but at this
point I think that will happen. Can't say anymore at this point!

I have met other musicians who have gone through this kind of crisis,
of course, playing 3 days a week in a SICU, almost 3 years now,
increases the chances of those encounters!

Andrew
Slogoin
2012-12-01 21:42:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by Andrew Schulman
Yes, it's a first book, but I've done a little writing before, and
some has been published.  I wrote the Afterword to Richard Dyer-
Bennet's biography (he was my mentor), and years ago some reviews,
etc.
Yeah, but by now you know that a book is another animal, like an
elephant is not like a dog.
Post by Andrew Schulman
I have met other musicians who have gone through this kind of crisis,
of course, playing 3 days a week in a SICU, almost 3 years now,
increases the chances of those encounters!
I figured that you might have. I work mostly with young people and
thank God none of them has had to go through that. Unfortunately some
have been through more than they should have at their young age. Loma
Linda had a music therapy program. I had a few students in that
program, almost three decades ago. IIRC they canceled it. It's great
to see it finally getting some serious traction. Dude, you are on the
bleeding edge! If you get famous please don't mention RMCG... {8>o
Andrew Schulman
2012-12-01 23:05:18 UTC
Permalink
...please don't mention RMCG...
In polite society it's unmentionable.

Fortunately I have no connection to polite society.

Andrew
Cactus Wren
2012-12-01 15:48:44 UTC
Permalink
Andrew, I did read your other post about the subjbect, but I didn't recall that there was a hypothesized mechanism for the superpowers. :) It is a beautiful thing. I wonder if it is sort of, vaguely similar, to approaching music using different "modalities"--auditory, visual, tactile, eyes closed, rest stroke/free stroke, spruce-cedar.

Good luck on your book! Put me on pre-order, especially if it comes with a CD :)
Post by Andrew Schulman
Post by Cactus Wren
Andrew,
I am sure glad to hear you are playing so well!
I can't help but have weird, Oliver Sachsian ideas going through my mind with all this.  Why did you get better??  I wonder if there was some, hopefully unimportant and nonfunctional part of your brain that went dark, leaving more juice for the important (music-playing, of course) part.
CW, I think I described the situation in an earlier thread but the
following may answer your question. If anyone reading this is new
here I'll give a little background.
In July 2009, after major surgery which included a blood transfusion,
I went into anaphylactic shock, a reaction to the transfusion, and was
clinically dead for about 2 minutes, which meant no oxygen to the
brain for those two minutes. Brain damage usually begins at about 3
minutes but things can happen faster than that.
I realized a few days after I got home that there was damage. I lost
the memory of almost all my memorized music, many hours worth. I also
completely lost the ability to memorize music. I tried hard for 18
months to reactivate my memory abilities but no dice so I gave up on
that.
I never followed up with a neurologist, or did formal rehab. I just
figured the damage was permanent, and a lot of other things were going
on in my life then so I didn't pursue remedies. I could read, and I
could play, that was good enough. Figured I wouldn't do concerts ever
again.
I didn't know it at the time but I could play and read because my
brain had done what's called a workaround in the first few weeks after
the surgery. My head hurt that first month, and it was a huge effort
to play at all, but I was determined to get back to work.
In large part because within a few months I was playing 5 days a week
with fairly intense gigs, 3 days/week in the Surgical ICU where I'd
been a patient, and 2 days a week at a restaurant here in NY with a
very musical crowd, I was actually getting the ideal rehab. In
essence, after a little over 2 years the network for the music memory
repaired. A neurologist explained the situation when my memory
abilities returned and I realized my skills were better than before
(which was pretty darn freaky when it kicked in, I was like...WTF is
going on!!). The brain doesn't discard the workaround it created, it
blends it in to the repaired network. Computer analogy: I wound up
with a faster processor and more memory.
And your Oliver Sachsian ideas are not weird, you simply have ESP. I
got in touch with Oliver Sachs about this last year because I'm
writing a book, and he put me in touch with his music/brain consultant
of the past 25 years, Dr. Connie Tomaino. She will be part of the
chapter about this aspect of the story.
And, small world, Connie and I were both students at Stony Brook
University in the 1970's (I'm two years older). She got music therapy
started there by doing independent study projects, while I was getting
classical guitar started there the same way (my private teacher was
Jerry Willard who was eventually hired as the faculty teacher, Jerry
posts here now from time to time). Connie and I barely knew each
other, except one afternoon we talked for an hour in the music
building, with her telling me about this fairly new thing called music
therapy and me telling her about classical guitar. When we spoke
next, last year, we both remembered that conversation.
Andrew
Andrew Schulman
2012-12-01 18:15:40 UTC
Permalink
Andrew, I did read your other post about the subjbect, but I didn't recall that there was a hypothesized mechanism for the superpowers. :)  It is a  beautiful thing.  I wonder if it is sort of, vaguely similar, to approaching music using different "modalities"--auditory, visual, tactile, eyes closed, rest stroke/free stroke, spruce-cedar.
Good luck on your book!  Put me on pre-order, especially if it comes with a CD :)
The neurologists I've talked to tell me that my situation is not
uncommon in similar circumstances. The term used is the plasticity of
the brain. PBS did a great documentary called The Music Instinct:
Science and Song, highly recommended for more about this topic.

I will just add that music is a growing force in medicine. The
hospital where I work is at the forefront, the music therapy
department is The Louis Armstrong Center for Music and Medicine, the
director is Dr. Joanne Loewy. Great department, and for the past year
I am no longer a volunteer, I'm part of the LACMM, funded as Resident
Visiting Artist in the SICU.

You know it's a real medical modality when the medical specialists,
the tough science crowd, says it is and want you at those bedsides. I
do see amazing things every week.

Andrew

P.S. And yes, the plan is there will be an accompanying CD with the
book!
Steven Bornfeld
2012-12-04 03:56:32 UTC
Permalink
Post by Andrew Schulman
Post by Cactus Wren
Andrew, I did read your other post about the subjbect, but I didn't recall that there was a hypothesized mechanism for the superpowers. :) It is a beautiful thing. I wonder if it is sort of, vaguely similar, to approaching music using different "modalities"--auditory, visual, tactile, eyes closed, rest stroke/free stroke, spruce-cedar.
Good luck on your book! Put me on pre-order, especially if it comes with a CD :)
The neurologists I've talked to tell me that my situation is not
uncommon in similar circumstances. The term used is the plasticity of
Science and Song, highly recommended for more about this topic.
I will just add that music is a growing force in medicine. The
hospital where I work is at the forefront, the music therapy
department is The Louis Armstrong Center for Music and Medicine, the
director is Dr. Joanne Loewy. Great department, and for the past year
I am no longer a volunteer, I'm part of the LACMM, funded as Resident
Visiting Artist in the SICU.
You know it's a real medical modality when the medical specialists,
the tough science crowd, says it is and want you at those bedsides. I
do see amazing things every week.
Andrew
P.S. And yes, the plan is there will be an accompanying CD with the
book!
Just saw this--congratulations on the gig, the book, the
appointment--BTW, you know it's a real medical modality when you start
spending major time on the phone with insurance companies wondering when
your claim is going to be paid!
S.
Andrew Schulman
2012-12-04 06:11:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by Steven Bornfeld
Just saw this--congratulations on the gig, the book, the
appointment--BTW, you know it's a real medical modality when you start
spending major time on the phone with insurance companies wondering when
your claim is going to be paid!
Thanks Steve.

Of course, the gig is a done deal but the book is something in the
works and not a done deal yet, though things are looking good.

I like the term medical modality. The doctors and nurses saw that
from the first day I got there, and it is a fantastic feeling when you
can do that with music. But, and this is very important, I THANK GOD
I don't have to get on the phone with the insurance companies!

Andrew
Steven Bornfeld
2012-12-04 16:01:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by Andrew Schulman
Thanks Steve.
Of course, the gig is a done deal but the book is something in the
works and not a done deal yet, though things are looking good.
I like the term medical modality. The doctors and nurses saw that
from the first day I got there, and it is a fantastic feeling when you
can do that with music. But, and this is very important, I THANK GOD
I don't have to get on the phone with the insurance companies!
Andrew
It could be worse. At least most of the insurance customer "service" is
domestic. Hasn't been outsourced--yet. Imagine being on the phone with
(for example) Dell customer service for hours and hours. So, I still
feel lucky.
Hope the book works out--would love to read it.

Steve
Cactus Wren
2012-12-04 16:23:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by Steven Bornfeld
Post by Andrew Schulman
Thanks Steve.
Of course, the gig is a done deal but the book is something in the
works and not a done deal yet, though things are looking good.
I like the term medical modality. The doctors and nurses saw that
from the first day I got there, and it is a fantastic feeling when you
can do that with music. But, and this is very important, I THANK GOD
I don't have to get on the phone with the insurance companies!
Andrew
It could be worse. At least most of the insurance customer "service" is
domestic. Hasn't been outsourced--yet. Imagine being on the phone with
(for example) Dell customer service for hours and hours. So, I still
feel lucky.
Hope the book works out--would love to read it.
Steve
What, "Your claim is denied" in a cheery East Indian accent is worse?
Alan Turing
2012-12-04 21:20:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by Cactus Wren
Post by Steven Bornfeld
Post by Andrew Schulman
Thanks Steve.
Of course, the gig is a done deal but the book is something in the
works and not a done deal yet, though things are looking good.
I like the term medical modality. The doctors and nurses saw that
from the first day I got there, and it is a fantastic feeling when you
can do that with music. But, and this is very important, I THANK GOD
I don't have to get on the phone with the insurance companies!
Andrew
It could be worse. At least most of the insurance customer "service" is
domestic. Hasn't been outsourced--yet. Imagine being on the phone with
(for example) Dell customer service for hours and hours. So, I still
feel lucky.
Hope the book works out--would love to read it.
Steve
What, "Your claim is denied" in a cheery East Indian accent is worse?
Hey...
--
-AlanTuring
Cactus Wren
2012-12-05 18:02:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by Alan Turing
Post by Cactus Wren
Post by Steven Bornfeld
Post by Andrew Schulman
Thanks Steve.
Of course, the gig is a done deal but the book is something in the
works and not a done deal yet, though things are looking good.
I like the term medical modality. The doctors and nurses saw that
from the first day I got there, and it is a fantastic feeling when you
can do that with music. But, and this is very important, I THANK GOD
I don't have to get on the phone with the insurance companies!
Andrew
It could be worse. At least most of the insurance customer "service" is
domestic. Hasn't been outsourced--yet. Imagine being on the phone with
(for example) Dell customer service for hours and hours. So, I still
feel lucky.
Hope the book works out--would love to read it.
Steve
What, "Your claim is denied" in a cheery East Indian accent is worse?
Hey...
--
-AlanTuring
What... better than saying it in a mean way!
Steven Bornfeld
2012-12-05 15:00:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by Cactus Wren
Post by Steven Bornfeld
Post by Andrew Schulman
Thanks Steve.
Of course, the gig is a done deal but the book is something in the
works and not a done deal yet, though things are looking good.
I like the term medical modality. The doctors and nurses saw that
from the first day I got there, and it is a fantastic feeling when you
can do that with music. But, and this is very important, I THANK GOD
I don't have to get on the phone with the insurance companies!
Andrew
It could be worse. At least most of the insurance customer "service" is
domestic. Hasn't been outsourced--yet. Imagine being on the phone with
(for example) Dell customer service for hours and hours. So, I still
feel lucky.
Hope the book works out--would love to read it.
Steve
What, "Your claim is denied" in a cheery East Indian accent is worse?
Cheery? No, it's bad enough as it is. I just don't want to be
transferred to 5 different people who don't know what they're talking
about to find out. Though, in fact, that is happening more and more
frequently here too.

Steve
Andrew Schulman
2012-12-04 17:16:43 UTC
Permalink
It could be worse.  At least most of the insurance customer "service" is
domestic.  Hasn't been outsourced--yet.  Imagine being on the phone with
(for example) Dell customer service for hours and hours.  So, I still
feel lucky.
Hope the book works out--would love to read it.
Thanks again, Steve.

Amdrew
Alan Turing
2012-12-01 22:32:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by Andrew Schulman
Post by John Nguyen
That's very cool, Andrew! I have to come to your concert one of these
days. Please keep me posted with you performance schedule.
Cheers,
John and Matt,
Much appreciated. I thought my concert days were over but really they
are just beginning anew. My 4th and final concert at 2nd Floor On
Clinton, final at least for this series the owner and I devised, will
be on March 19th, all-Bach, or almost all, 2nd half will start with
the op. 3, #3 G major Vivaldi concerto that Bach had arranged for solo
Andrew Schulman, 8-String Guitar
Tuesday, March 19, 2013 7:30 PM
2nd Floor On Clinton
67 Clinton Street New York, NY
http://2ndflooronclinton.com/
Choral: Befiehl du deine Wege (Entrust Thy Way), BWV 244…J.S. Bach
(1685-1750)
Suite in D major (orig. 1st ‘Cello Suite), BWV 1007
Prelude
Allemande
Courante
Sarabande
Menuet I & II
Gigue
Sarabande (2nd Lute Suite), BWV 997
Bourrée (1st Lute Suite), BWV 996
Gigue
INTERMISSION
Concerto in G, Op. 3, #3…Antonio Vivaldi (1678-1741)
Allegro
Largo
Allegro
Prelude - Fugue - Allegro, BWV 998…J.S. Bach
Prelude BWV 999
Fugue (based on BWV 539 & 1001)
I'm glad to hear your concert went well Andrew, wish i could have been
there to hear it. Your next performance seems to be most interesting as
well especially since I am a Bach fanatic. I am envious of those who
will be attending your performance on the 19th, unfortunately $200 is a
bit steep for me otherwise i would be there 100%, it's right during my
spring break too. Perhaps one day!
--
-AlanTuring
Andrew Schulman
2012-12-01 23:08:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by Alan Turing
unfortunately $200 is a
bit steep for me...
Alan, you clicked on the link for their New Years Eve celebration.
Ticket price for my concert is $25, $20 if you reserve ahead of time.
There is no link yet for that concert, it goes up about 3 weeks before
the performance.

Andrew
Alan Turing
2012-12-01 23:40:51 UTC
Permalink
Post by Andrew Schulman
Post by Alan Turing
unfortunately $200 is a
bit steep for me...
Alan, you clicked on the link for their New Years Eve celebration.
Ticket price for my concert is $25, $20 if you reserve ahead of time.
There is no link yet for that concert, it goes up about 3 weeks before
the performance.
Andrew
I….should have realized…this means i will be there!
--
-AlanTuring
Andrew Schulman
2012-12-02 00:51:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by Alan Turing
I….should have realized…this means i will be there!
--
-Alan
Great! It will be nice to meet you.

Andrew
Alan Turing
2012-12-04 00:55:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by Andrew Schulman
Post by Alan Turing
I….should have realized…this means i will be there!
--
-Alan
Great! It will be nice to meet you.
Andrew
The pleasure will be mine.
--
-AlanTuring
Alan Turing
2013-02-15 23:07:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by Andrew Schulman
Post by Alan Turing
I….should have realized…this means i will be there!
--
-Alan
Great! It will be nice to meet you.
Andrew
Hello! I was wondering if this concert was still on? It seems the
planets have indeed aligned, i should be there on the 19th.
--
-AlanTuring
Richard Jernigan
2012-12-01 20:20:34 UTC
Permalink
Hey, Andrew--

Congratulations on the concert--great news. Also great news on the book project. Let us know when it hits the street. You'll get big sales from the millions of RMCG enthusiasts! Or at least dozens...when we saw you at Alouette I think you had more obvious fans there than there are regular posters here.

RNJ
Andrew Schulman
2012-12-01 20:46:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by Richard Jernigan
Hey, Andrew--
Congratulations on the concert--great news. Also great news on the book project. Let us know when it hits the street. You'll get big sales from the millions of RMCG enthusiasts! Or at least dozens...when we saw you at Alouette I think you had more obvious fans there than there are regular posters here.
Thank you, Richard. I've said it before and I'll say it again, you
absolutely should collect the stories you've written here and
elsewhere and publish them. You have a lot of great material from a
lifetime of traveling with the guitar as your passport.

By the way, I'm off to a very good start with my new steady gig,
another bistro, Picnic, a few blocks from where Alouette was. Next
time you both are back in NY on a Friday night drop by, the chef is
superb.

Andrew
Slogoin
2012-12-01 22:20:50 UTC
Permalink
Thank you, Richard.  I've said it before and I'll say it again, you
absolutely should collect the stories you've written here and
elsewhere and publish them.  You have a lot of great material from a
lifetime of traveling with the guitar as your passport.
I think his passport was his field but, as you know, playing music
also gets you access to places most tourist never get to know. I like
the combination of art and science along with the lived history of
both the world of power and the magical power of local life. The
guitar, CG and flamenco, is perfect as the central instrument but many
of his best stories are from his trumpet years.

BTW, from what I've seen of his photography it might be hard to do
both stories and images in one book. The thing is, he's still
traveling, a LOT...
Andrew Schulman
2012-12-01 23:12:23 UTC
Permalink
   I think his passport was his field...I like
the combination of art and science...
You're right, he does have a great combo. His stories do cover a lot
of ground, but many of them involve the guitar, and I think a book
having that at the center would have the most interest especially as
the guitar is the world's most popular musical instrument, besides the
harmonica and the kazoo.

Andrew
Slogoin
2012-12-02 00:29:16 UTC
Permalink
You're right, he does have a great combo.  His stories do cover a lot
of ground, but many of them involve the guitar, and I think a book
having that at the center would have the most interest especially as
the guitar is the world's most popular musical instrument, besides the
harmonica and the kazoo.
Guitar is EVERYWHERE! and you CAN take it with you. It is fun to
travel with one just for the number of folks who you can meet. Great
ice breaker. I also carry a harmonica which is really a wonderful
instrument as you know.

Now here's a question for you... just because you live an
interesting life does that mean you should document it?

The mother of one of the students my wife and I taught convinced
her mother to write a book about her extraordinary life. It was very
good and very interesting to read about world events from her view as
a teenager in the middle of it all. Two ladies who are friends of ours
are the daughters of the last schoonerman. Both books are about
individuals who had a role in a much larger history that involved
secrets and major historical events.

If you don't mind, what made you take the leap?

Anyway, I'm sure RNJ could use the guitar as a central figure and
maybe that would limit it to one book. A short story collection like
Maughm might be the way to go. A lot of travelers are into Maughm's
travel stories because they recognize the lifestyle in the writing.
One friend sells that to his fans as he travels the world with his
guitar and gets to work with all kinds of famous folks.
Andrew Schulman
2012-12-02 00:58:26 UTC
Permalink
   Now here's a question for you... just because you live an
interesting life does that mean you should document it?
That's an interesting question for which I don't have an answer.
   If you don't mind, what made you take the leap?
I started keeping a journal when I started playing in the SICU because
I had a feeling I was starting on an interesting journey and figured
that would be a good way to remember things later in life. After a
month or so I started sending it to some friends and colleagues at the
hospital and everyone said...book.

But even before that I was being urged to write a book because I had
so many years, primarily in NY, having very interesting experiences
via the guitar, places and people where I played. Some of those
stories will be in this book.

Andrew
Slogoin
2012-12-02 01:18:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by Andrew Schulman
That's an interesting question for which I don't have an answer.
Neither do I and I have asked that question of others and it seems
nobody has an answer.
Post by Andrew Schulman
   If you don't mind, what made you take the leap?
But even before that I was being urged to write a book because I had
so many years, primarily in NY, having very interesting experiences
via the guitar, places and people where I played.
That fits. At some point it seems others urge those with
interesting stories to write about them. Do you remember the first
time someone told you that you have led an interesting life? Sorry for
the questions but this has been on my mind for a while. So when does
the movie come out?
Andrew Schulman
2012-12-02 05:52:50 UTC
Permalink
    Do you remember the first
time someone told you that you have led an interesting life?
I don't recall anyone ever saying that to me.
Sorry for
the questions but this has been on my mind for a while. So when does
the movie come out?
The movie will be released on Wednesday, December 12th, this is the
trailer which was just completed a few days ago:



Andrew
Cactus Wren
2012-12-04 02:15:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by Andrew Schulman
    Do you remember the first
time someone told you that you have led an interesting life?
I don't recall anyone ever saying that to me.
I was actually getting a little jealous, because no one has said that to me either. So I guess I'm glad no one has told you you have led an interesting life.
Andrew Schulman
2012-12-04 06:02:28 UTC
Permalink
I was actually getting a little jealous, because no one has said that to me either.  So I guess I'm glad > no one has told you you have led an interesting life.
CW, it's true, no one has ever said that I've led an interesting
life. They've said fantastic life, amazing life, incredible life,
etc., etc., etc. But not interesting life.

Andrew
Slogoin
2012-12-04 15:10:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by Andrew Schulman
CW, it's true, no one has ever said that I've led an interesting
life.  They've said fantastic life, amazing life, incredible life,
etc., etc., etc.
So do you remember the first time someone said that to you?
Andrew Schulman
2012-12-04 17:24:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by Andrew Schulman
CW, it's true, no one has ever said that I've led an interesting
life.  They've said fantastic life, amazing life, incredible life,
etc., etc., etc.
   So do you remember the first time someone said that to you?
Well, of course I am joking in my comment above. Usually, over the
years, if someone is talking about my choice to become a professional
musician the comments are about the plus side of doing something you
love. The negative side is about a profession that was very difficult
to do when I started in 1975 and has only gotten more difficult over
the years.

As far as the last three years, the story about what happened to me at
Beth Israel, and my response being to return as a musician, and the
experiences I've had, is indeed an interesting story to many people
and that's why I'm writing a book and was able to get a literary agent
to represent me. I won't say any more about that now because things
are in progress. When things get to the next step, and I think they
will, I'll post about it.

Andrew
Cactus Wren
2012-12-04 15:31:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by Andrew Schulman
I was actually getting a little jealous, because no one has said that to me either.  So I guess I'm glad > no one has told you you have led an interesting life.
CW, it's true, no one has ever said that I've led an interesting
life. They've said fantastic life, amazing life, incredible life,
etc., etc., etc. But not interesting life.
Oh....
Post by Andrew Schulman
Andrew
Slogoin
2012-12-04 15:50:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by Cactus Wren
Post by Andrew Schulman
Post by Cactus Wren
I was actually getting a little jealous, because no one has said that to me either.
CW, it's true, no one has ever said that I've led an interesting
life.  They've said fantastic life, amazing life, incredible life,
etc., etc., etc.  But not interesting life.
Oh....
Not sure why you would be jealous. Has anybody told you that you
should write a book about your life?
Cactus Wren
2012-12-04 16:22:38 UTC
Permalink
Post by Slogoin
Post by Cactus Wren
Post by Andrew Schulman
Post by Cactus Wren
I was actually getting a little jealous, because no one has said that to me either.
CW, it's true, no one has ever said that I've led an interesting
life.  They've said fantastic life, amazing life, incredible life,
etc., etc., etc.  But not interesting life.
Oh....
Not sure why you would be jealous. Has anybody told you that you
should write a book about your life?
No. Now I really feel bad.
Slogoin
2012-12-04 16:44:04 UTC
Permalink
No.  Now I really feel bad.
Why? You are young and have lots of time. Andrew is younger than
any of those who I've met who have written books about their life.
From what I've found by asking that question it usually comes before
the, "You should write a book." YMMV
Andrew Schulman
2012-12-04 17:32:58 UTC
Permalink
   Why? You are young and have lots of time. Andrew is younger than
any of those who I've met who have written books about their life.
From what I've found by asking that question it usually comes before
the, "You should write a book."  YMMV
Larry, you are referring to the genre called personal memoir. I'm not
writing a personal memoir but rather a book about a specific story,
how music acted as a medical modality for me when I was critically
ill, how I then became the resident musician in that SICU, and how
that work helped heal me as well as the patients I played for as well
as helping the patients caretakers and the medical staff. There are
references to my lifelong career in music which is not a few years,
I'm 60 and led my first band when I was 12 years old, but the book is
focussed on the medical/music story.

Andrew
Slogoin
2012-12-04 17:52:30 UTC
Permalink
Larry, you are referring to the genre called personal memoir.  I'm not
writing a personal memoir but rather a book about a specific story,
Maybe I was not clear. Those I know who wrote books about their
life wrote about only part of their life. One was about when India
became independent and the author was only 18 but she wrote it in her
80's. One year in her extraordinary life. She has a second book now
as the first caused friends to say that one was not enough. I suspect
that you may be in for the same thing.
Andrew Schulman
2012-12-04 20:40:34 UTC
Permalink
   Maybe I was not clear. Those I know who wrote books about their
life wrote about only part of their life. One was about when India
became independent and the author was only 18 but she wrote it in her
80's.  One year in her extraordinary life. She has a second book now
as the first caused friends to say that one was not enough. I suspect
that you may be in for the same thing.
I have a saying: guitar is easy, writing is hard. One of my friends
countered with, "Elmore Leonard says writing is easy, guitar is
hard." Yes, she is an Elmore Leonard fame, no, she doesn't know if
he plays the guitar.

I've found, as have many people with an interesting story but no
previous experience in writing a book, that it's much more difficult
to do than you imagine at first. I've discovered it's a lot like
learning to play music on a guitar - if you work at it the right way
you get better.

I do have a second book in mind, a story set in the 18th century I
chanced upon over 20 years ago, that would possibly be of great
interest to many people here. It's about music, sex, and violence,
and genius. The chances of my writing it were slim to none before I
started this book I'm doing now, but if this one is successful it
might allow the other one to come to life. Only my wife and a few
close friends know the story.

One thing at a time though,

Andrew
Slogoin
2012-12-04 22:13:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by Andrew Schulman
I've found, as have many people with an interesting story but no
previous experience in writing a book, that it's much more difficult
to do than you imagine at first.
Like I've said before, "Some things are a lot harder than than
look." Writing a book that is worth reading is non trivial. The thing
is most folks are way off in estimating the amount of work it is for
the first book.
Post by Andrew Schulman
I do have a second book in mind,
Ah ha! I knew it. For that one you can use the money from the first
book and movie to fund a year on an island to get the second one done.
Post by Andrew Schulman
It's about music, sex, and violence, and genius.
Don't tell Learnwell.
Post by Andrew Schulman
One thing at a time though,
Not if you juggle.

Of course we are assuming MT is wrong about the 21st and the world
will still be rotating the same way next year.
Andrew Schulman
2012-12-04 17:25:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by Cactus Wren
Post by Andrew Schulman
I was actually getting a little jealous, because no one has said that to me either.  So I guess I'm glad > no one has told you you have led an interesting life.
CW, it's true, no one has ever said that I've led an interesting
life.  They've said fantastic life, amazing life, incredible life,
etc., etc., etc.  But not interesting life.
Oh....
See response to Larry re: this rather hilarious response for
clarification...

Andrew
Richard Jernigan
2012-12-06 19:28:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by Slogoin
Thank you, Richard.  I've said it before and I'll say it again, you
absolutely should collect the stories you've written here and
elsewhere and publish them.  You have a lot of great material from a
lifetime of traveling with the guitar as your passport.
I think his passport was his field but, as you know, playing music
also gets you access to places most tourist never get to know. I like
the combination of art and science along with the lived history of
both the world of power and the magical power of local life. The
guitar, CG and flamenco, is perfect as the central instrument but many
of his best stories are from his trumpet years.
BTW, from what I've seen of his photography it might be hard to do
both stories and images in one book. The thing is, he's still
traveling, a LOT...
[With false modesty]: Aww, c'mon guys..

Larisa took me to Italy in May. She had lived there when she was in the Air Force, speaks the language fluently, didn't need to look at a map when she drove me around the Amalfi coast. She had been all around the country on her big motorcycle. We also did Tuscany and Venice. She had to come back to the USA for work, but I stayed in Europe until the end of June.

Italy was wonderful. I could spend a month at the Uffizi and the Accademia in Florence. However I don't think I'll tramp through the miles and miles of the Vatican Museum again with the footsore thundering herd. The whole time I kept thinking of Dorothy Parker's comment after going to the house warming party at William Randolph Hearst's mansion. "It shows what God could have done, if He had money."

I visited my college room mate in Munich. We had a blast. Among the things we discussed was our absolute fearlessness in youth--Tom was a successful Gran Turismo racer in a factory Porsche-- and whether it had been a virtue, or just stupidity.

I mentioned the Strauss concert at the Nymphenburg Palace in an earlier post. When we decided to go, I asked Tom whether we were appropriately dressed. Tom has always cultivated a distinctive appearance. With age it has veered toward eccentricity. An Einsteinian mane of gray hair, a full beard, a colorful shirt over an imposing beer belly, nondescript trousers held up by clashing suspenders. It was some time before I realized that the random pattern of on his handmade shoes was not some exotic fashion, just patches where they were worn.

I had on a brown herringbone sport jacket that looked well lived in after weeks of travel, a thoroughly crushed pink dress shirt, khaki trousers and shoes that were a bit dusty. Tom assured me that we were dressed perfectly well.

We rolled up to the palace in Tom's Lamborghini and turned it over to the valet. Inside, the prosperous middle class Muencheners had on nice suits and ties, crisply starched shirts, well polished shoes, nice little dresses with high heels and an occasional modest string of pearls.

We were treated with extraordinary courtesy at the ticket table and by the ushers. After we were seated I muttered to Tom that they couldn't possibly have seen the car.

"Oh," he said, "I think we were mistaken for Bavarian nobility. But if they had looked a little closer they would have seen that our teeth aren't bad enough."

I went for a week to the wilds of Norfolk in England where my family lived before coming to America. I photographed the 14th century paintings of the saints on the rood screen of the church that my ancestor paid for, and the tombs of my distinguished forebears. (Steele in The Spectator: "He boasted such a lengthened succession of distinguished forebears, that they trod the Earth before the appearance of the first man.") I'm doing a book for my parents' 23 descendants with photos we inherited from my mother, so I thought the saints would look nice in it. I hope the daguerrotypes will scan OK.

While I was in Spain I visited a Foro Flamenco member and his wife who were vacationing in the tiny village of Ferreirola in the Alpujarras south of Granada. I rented a car in Granada and did the drive through spectacular mountain scenery. The village is literally at the end of the road. After boring them throughout a long lunch at a local inn, they said I should be sure to write all that stuff down. I told them I was too busy to do it now, and by the time I got around to it, I would probably be so old and stove up I wouldn't remember anything.

After Christmas we're headed to Thailand. Again, Larisa has to be back at work after a couple of weeks, but I plan to stay at least until the end of January. I have a friend who is a master electrician. He is working on a U.S. Embassy construction project in Vientiane. He was one of my regular dive buddies at Kwajalein. I've been to Luang Prabang, but not to the Laotian capital. I figure Steve can show me around.

Now that Burma/Myanmar seems to consider joining the civilized world, I might head to Mandalay, and onward to Pagan. I've alway been interested in the ruins of ancient civilizations. So far Angkor tops the list for spectacular architecture and extent, but Pagan looks pretty big and interesting.

In the spring, there's Holy Week in Seville, followed by a weeklong get together of flamenco fans at a village south of Granada. There will be guitar lessons, opportunities to learn to accompany singing and dancing, lecturesby flamencologists and a luthier, food and wine.

Wanderlust seems to be a chronic condition. I'm burning up my frequent flier miles.

Time to keep working through the 851 page book about my new camera, practice a couple of pieces for the flamenco deal, and go for a walk to break in my new shoes.

RNJ
Curmudgeon
2012-12-06 22:11:20 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 6 Dec 2012 11:28:20 -0800 (PST), Richard Jernigan
Post by Richard Jernigan
Post by Slogoin
Thank you, Richard.  I've said it before and I'll say it again, you
absolutely should collect the stories you've written here and
elsewhere and publish them.  You have a lot of great material from a
lifetime of traveling with the guitar as your passport.
I think his passport was his field but, as you know, playing music
also gets you access to places most tourist never get to know. I like
the combination of art and science along with the lived history of
both the world of power and the magical power of local life. The
guitar, CG and flamenco, is perfect as the central instrument but many
of his best stories are from his trumpet years.
BTW, from what I've seen of his photography it might be hard to do
both stories and images in one book. The thing is, he's still
traveling, a LOT...
[With false modesty]: Aww, c'mon guys..
Larisa took me to Italy in May. She had lived there when she was in the Air Force, speaks the language fluently, didn't need to look at a map when she drove me around the Amalfi coast. She had been all around the country on her big motorcycle. We also did Tuscany and Venice. She had to come back to the USA for work, but I stayed in Europe until the end of June.
Italy was wonderful. I could spend a month at the Uffizi and the Accademia in Florence. However I don't think I'll tramp through the miles and miles of the Vatican Museum again with the footsore thundering herd. The whole time I kept thinking of Dorothy Parker's comment after going to the house warming party at William Randolph Hearst's mansion. "It shows what God could have done, if He had money."
I visited my college room mate in Munich. We had a blast. Among the things we discussed was our absolute fearlessness in youth--Tom was a successful Gran Turismo racer in a factory Porsche-- and whether it had been a virtue, or just stupidity.
I mentioned the Strauss concert at the Nymphenburg Palace in an earlier post. When we decided to go, I asked Tom whether we were appropriately dressed. Tom has always cultivated a distinctive appearance. With age it has veered toward eccentricity. An Einsteinian mane of gray hair, a full beard, a colorful shirt over an imposing beer belly, nondescript trousers held up by clashing suspenders. It was some time before I realized that the random pattern of on his handmade shoes was not some exotic fashion, just patches where they were worn.
I had on a brown herringbone sport jacket that looked well lived in after weeks of travel, a thoroughly crushed pink dress shirt, khaki trousers and shoes that were a bit dusty. Tom assured me that we were dressed perfectly well.
We rolled up to the palace in Tom's Lamborghini and turned it over to the valet. Inside, the prosperous middle class Muencheners had on nice suits and ties, crisply starched shirts, well polished shoes, nice little dresses with high heels and an occasional modest string of pearls.
We were treated with extraordinary courtesy at the ticket table and by the ushers. After we were seated I muttered to Tom that they couldn't possibly have seen the car.
"Oh," he said, "I think we were mistaken for Bavarian nobility. But if they had looked a little closer they would have seen that our teeth aren't bad enough."
I went for a week to the wilds of Norfolk in England where my family lived before coming to America. I photographed the 14th century paintings of the saints on the rood screen of the church that my ancestor paid for, and the tombs of my distinguished forebears. (Steele in The Spectator: "He boasted such a lengthened succession of distinguished forebears, that they trod the Earth before the appearance of the first man.") I'm doing a book for my parents' 23 descendants with photos we inherited from my mother, so I thought the saints would look nice in it. I hope the daguerrotypes will scan OK.
While I was in Spain I visited a Foro Flamenco member and his wife who were vacationing in the tiny village of Ferreirola in the Alpujarras south of Granada. I rented a car in Granada and did the drive through spectacular mountain scenery. The village is literally at the end of the road. After boring them throughout a long lunch at a local inn, they said I should be sure to write all that stuff down. I told them I was too busy to do it now, and by the time I got around to it, I would probably be so old and stove up I wouldn't remember anything.
After Christmas we're headed to Thailand. Again, Larisa has to be back at work after a couple of weeks, but I plan to stay at least until the end of January. I have a friend who is a master electrician. He is working on a U.S. Embassy construction project in Vientiane. He was one of my regular dive buddies at Kwajalein. I've been to Luang Prabang, but not to the Laotian capital. I figure Steve can show me around.
Now that Burma/Myanmar seems to consider joining the civilized world, I might head to Mandalay, and onward to Pagan. I've alway been interested in the ruins of ancient civilizations. So far Angkor tops the list for spectacular architecture and extent, but Pagan looks pretty big and interesting.
In the spring, there's Holy Week in Seville, followed by a weeklong get together of flamenco fans at a village south of Granada. There will be guitar lessons, opportunities to learn to accompany singing and dancing, lecturesby flamencologists and a luthier, food and wine.
Wanderlust seems to be a chronic condition. I'm burning up my frequent flier miles.
Time to keep working through the 851 page book about my new camera, practice a couple of pieces for the flamenco deal, and go for a walk to break in my new shoes.
RNJ
As Tom Lehrer said,"It Is A Sobering Thought That When Mozart Was My
Age, He Had Been Dead For 2 Years." Some people indeed live
interesting lives. As for me, I can't remember the last time I rolled
up to a palace in a Lamborghini. I did go to the grocery in a Hyundai
the other day, though.
Steven Bornfeld
2012-12-06 23:43:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by Curmudgeon
As Tom Lehrer said,"It Is A Sobering Thought That When Mozart Was My
Age, He Had Been Dead For 2 Years." Some people indeed live
interesting lives. As for me, I can't remember the last time I rolled
up to a palace in a Lamborghini. I did go to the grocery in a Hyundai
the other day, though.
+1
thomas
2012-12-07 02:25:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by Curmudgeon
As for me, I can't remember the last time I rolled
up to a palace in a Lamborghini.
You can't remember? You must have been partying your brains out that day.
dsi1
2012-12-07 21:27:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by Curmudgeon
As Tom Lehrer said,"It Is A Sobering Thought That When Mozart Was My
Age, He Had Been Dead For 2 Years." Some people indeed live
interesting lives. As for me, I can't remember the last time I rolled
up to a palace in a Lamborghini. I did go to the grocery in a Hyundai
the other day, though.
The Hyundai 3.3L V6 engine is a pretty bitchin' one. Alloy block and
heads, 24 valve, double overhead cams, with variable intake valve
timing. It's smooth as snot and I've tried to start it a couple of times
when it was running. That never happened with my Ford V6.

It's a wonderful engine design but these monsters of complexity will
probably be replaced soon with electric motors. I wonder how Lamborghini
will fare - the exotics will have fantastic engines but there's nothing
exotic about an electric motor.
Curmudgeon
2012-12-07 22:35:55 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 07 Dec 2012 11:27:13 -1000, dsi1
Post by dsi1
Post by Curmudgeon
As Tom Lehrer said,"It Is A Sobering Thought That When Mozart Was My
Age, He Had Been Dead For 2 Years." Some people indeed live
interesting lives. As for me, I can't remember the last time I rolled
up to a palace in a Lamborghini. I did go to the grocery in a Hyundai
the other day, though.
The Hyundai 3.3L V6 engine is a pretty bitchin' one. Alloy block and
heads, 24 valve, double overhead cams, with variable intake valve
timing. It's smooth as snot and I've tried to start it a couple of times
when it was running. That never happened with my Ford V6.
It's a wonderful engine design but these monsters of complexity will
probably be replaced soon with electric motors. I wonder how Lamborghini
will fare - the exotics will have fantastic engines but there's nothing
exotic about an electric motor.
Actually, my trip to the grocery was in a black/black Genesis 3.8.
I've owned a lot of cars in the past 50 years, including MB, BMW and
Volvo, and the Genesis is by far the best car I've ever owned. Great
engine, great transmission, great ride, great looks. And a 10year/100K
bumper-to-bumper warranty to boot. It's no Lamborhini, but then, what
is?
dsi1
2012-12-07 23:44:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by Curmudgeon
On Fri, 07 Dec 2012 11:27:13 -1000, dsi1
Post by dsi1
Post by Curmudgeon
As Tom Lehrer said,"It Is A Sobering Thought That When Mozart Was My
Age, He Had Been Dead For 2 Years." Some people indeed live
interesting lives. As for me, I can't remember the last time I rolled
up to a palace in a Lamborghini. I did go to the grocery in a Hyundai
the other day, though.
The Hyundai 3.3L V6 engine is a pretty bitchin' one. Alloy block and
heads, 24 valve, double overhead cams, with variable intake valve
timing. It's smooth as snot and I've tried to start it a couple of times
when it was running. That never happened with my Ford V6.
It's a wonderful engine design but these monsters of complexity will
probably be replaced soon with electric motors. I wonder how Lamborghini
will fare - the exotics will have fantastic engines but there's nothing
exotic about an electric motor.
Actually, my trip to the grocery was in a black/black Genesis 3.8.
I've owned a lot of cars in the past 50 years, including MB, BMW and
Volvo, and the Genesis is by far the best car I've ever owned. Great
engine, great transmission, great ride, great looks. And a 10year/100K
bumper-to-bumper warranty to boot. It's no Lamborhini, but then, what
is?
Be careful, you stand to lose your curmudgeon certification rating if
you continue to drive a sexy, fast car like that.
Curmudgeon
2012-12-08 00:11:55 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 07 Dec 2012 13:44:40 -1000, dsi1
Post by dsi1
Post by Curmudgeon
On Fri, 07 Dec 2012 11:27:13 -1000, dsi1
Post by dsi1
Post by Curmudgeon
As Tom Lehrer said,"It Is A Sobering Thought That When Mozart Was My
Age, He Had Been Dead For 2 Years." Some people indeed live
interesting lives. As for me, I can't remember the last time I rolled
up to a palace in a Lamborghini. I did go to the grocery in a Hyundai
the other day, though.
The Hyundai 3.3L V6 engine is a pretty bitchin' one. Alloy block and
heads, 24 valve, double overhead cams, with variable intake valve
timing. It's smooth as snot and I've tried to start it a couple of times
when it was running. That never happened with my Ford V6.
It's a wonderful engine design but these monsters of complexity will
probably be replaced soon with electric motors. I wonder how Lamborghini
will fare - the exotics will have fantastic engines but there's nothing
exotic about an electric motor.
Actually, my trip to the grocery was in a black/black Genesis 3.8.
I've owned a lot of cars in the past 50 years, including MB, BMW and
Volvo, and the Genesis is by far the best car I've ever owned. Great
engine, great transmission, great ride, great looks. And a 10year/100K
bumper-to-bumper warranty to boot. It's no Lamborhini, but then, what
is?
Be careful, you stand to lose your curmudgeon certification rating if
you continue to drive a sexy, fast car like that.
I always wear my Groucho glasses when I drive the Genny
dsi1
2012-12-08 06:15:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by Curmudgeon
On Fri, 07 Dec 2012 13:44:40 -1000, dsi1
Post by dsi1
Post by Curmudgeon
On Fri, 07 Dec 2012 11:27:13 -1000, dsi1
Post by dsi1
Post by Curmudgeon
As Tom Lehrer said,"It Is A Sobering Thought That When Mozart Was My
Age, He Had Been Dead For 2 Years." Some people indeed live
interesting lives. As for me, I can't remember the last time I rolled
up to a palace in a Lamborghini. I did go to the grocery in a Hyundai
the other day, though.
The Hyundai 3.3L V6 engine is a pretty bitchin' one. Alloy block and
heads, 24 valve, double overhead cams, with variable intake valve
timing. It's smooth as snot and I've tried to start it a couple of times
when it was running. That never happened with my Ford V6.
It's a wonderful engine design but these monsters of complexity will
probably be replaced soon with electric motors. I wonder how Lamborghini
will fare - the exotics will have fantastic engines but there's nothing
exotic about an electric motor.
Actually, my trip to the grocery was in a black/black Genesis 3.8.
I've owned a lot of cars in the past 50 years, including MB, BMW and
Volvo, and the Genesis is by far the best car I've ever owned. Great
engine, great transmission, great ride, great looks. And a 10year/100K
bumper-to-bumper warranty to boot. It's no Lamborhini, but then, what
is?
Be careful, you stand to lose your curmudgeon certification rating if
you continue to drive a sexy, fast car like that.
I always wear my Groucho glasses when I drive the Genny
The best curmudgeon car is a 1936 Flivver Tomahawk.
Fadosolrélamisi
2012-12-08 06:27:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by dsi1
Post by Curmudgeon
On Fri, 07 Dec 2012 13:44:40 -1000, dsi1
Post by dsi1
Post by Curmudgeon
On Fri, 07 Dec 2012 11:27:13 -1000, dsi1
Post by dsi1
Post by Curmudgeon
As Tom Lehrer said,"It Is A Sobering Thought That When Mozart Was My
Age, He Had Been Dead For 2 Years." Some people indeed live
interesting lives. As for me, I can't remember the last time I rolled
up to a palace in a Lamborghini. I did go to the grocery in a Hyundai
the other day, though.
The Hyundai 3.3L V6 engine is a pretty bitchin' one. Alloy block and
heads, 24 valve, double overhead cams, with variable intake valve
timing. It's smooth as snot and I've tried to start it a couple of times
when it was running. That never happened with my Ford V6.
It's a wonderful engine design but these monsters of complexity will
probably be replaced soon with electric motors. I wonder how Lamborghini
will fare - the exotics will have fantastic engines but there's nothing
exotic about an electric motor.
Actually, my trip to the grocery was in a black/black Genesis 3.8.
I've owned a lot of cars in the past 50 years, including MB, BMW and
Volvo, and the Genesis is by far the best car I've ever owned. Great
engine, great transmission, great ride, great looks. And a 10year/100K
bumper-to-bumper warranty to boot. It's no Lamborhini, but then, what
is?
Be careful, you stand to lose your curmudgeon certification rating if
you continue to drive a sexy, fast car like that.
I always wear my Groucho glasses when I drive the Genny
The best curmudgeon car is a 1936 Flivver Tomahawk.
Watch out! He is coming to get you!

Loading Image...
dsi1
2012-12-08 07:06:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by Fadosolrélamisi
Post by dsi1
The best curmudgeon car is a 1936 Flivver Tomahawk.
Watch out! He is coming to get you!
http://weburbanist.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/01/convaircar.jpg
It's the latest Ruski stealth fighter. This amazing aircraft can use any
2 lane highway for takeoff and landing plus it gets almost 28 MPG on
regular gas. It's brilliant!
Andrew Schulman
2012-12-07 23:45:09 UTC
Permalink
is a pretty bitchin' one...
David,

Please watch your language,

Thank you,

Andrew
dsi1
2012-12-07 23:55:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by Andrew Schulman
is a pretty bitchin' one...
David,
Please watch your language,
Thank you,
Andrew
Oh Andrew! Sometime you make me so mad...















































































































.
Andrew Schulman
2012-12-08 05:19:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by dsi1
Post by Andrew Schulman
is a pretty bitchin' one...
David,
Please watch your language,
Thank you,
Andrew
Oh Andrew! Sometime you make me so mad...
WTF!!!

Andrew
dsi1
2012-12-08 18:25:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by Andrew Schulman
Post by dsi1
Post by Andrew Schulman
is a pretty bitchin' one...
David,
Please watch your language,
Thank you,
Andrew
Oh Andrew! Sometime you make me so mad...
WTF!!!
Shut yo mouth!

The original was "Oh Marie... sometime you make me so mad!" It's from
some Woody Allan movie. You have to say it with a French accent. Funny
as hell... well, maybe not.
Post by Andrew Schulman
Andrew
Andrew Schulman
2012-12-08 18:58:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by dsi1
Shut yo mouth!
The original was "Oh Marie... sometime you make me so mad!" It's from
some Woody Allan movie.
Which?

Andrew
dsi1
2012-12-08 21:25:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by Andrew Schulman
Post by dsi1
Shut yo mouth!
The original was "Oh Marie... sometime you make me so mad!" It's from
some Woody Allan movie.
Which?
Andrew
I was hoping nobody would ask that question. I don't know. It was
probably "Annie Hall." Woody is looking at a job working as a writer for
a comedian and the guy is trying to give Woody an example of his style.
He delivers that line with a French accent and claims that it always
kills the audience, "They just love this stuff!" There's a high angle
close up of Woody's face with a fake smile/grimace and a voice-over of
him thinking to himself "Is this guy kidding? This is awful..."

I'm usually good at trivia but all his freaking movies have blurred into
one long movie. Well two movies actually, his early funny films and
then the later ones with more of a production budget. OTOH, anything
after Annie Hall, I don't really remembers much. My favorite movie would
be "Take the Money and Run" which gives you an idea of my level of
sophistication in this area.
Andrew Schulman
2012-12-08 21:30:22 UTC
Permalink
Post by dsi1
My favorite movie would
be "Take the Money and Run" which gives you an idea of my level of
sophistication in this area.
Me too.

Andrew
Andrew Schulman
2012-12-07 01:43:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by Richard Jernigan
Thank you, Richard.  I've said it before and I'll say it again, you
absolutely should collect the stories you've written here and
elsewhere and publish them.  You have a lot of great material from a
lifetime of traveling with the guitar as your passport.
   I think his passport was his field but, as you know, playing music
also gets you access to places most tourist never get to know. I like
the combination of art and science along with the lived history of
both the world of power and the magical power of local life. The
guitar, CG and flamenco, is perfect as the central instrument but many
of his best stories are from his trumpet years.
   BTW, from what I've seen of his photography it might be hard to do
both stories and images in one book. The thing is, he's still
traveling, a LOT...
[With false modesty]: Aww, c'mon guys..
Larisa took me to Italy in May. She had lived there when she was in the Air Force, speaks the language fluently, didn't need to look at a map when she drove me around the Amalfi coast. She had been all around the country on her big motorcycle. We also did Tuscany and Venice. She had to come back to the USA for work, but I stayed in Europe until the end of June.
Italy was wonderful. I could spend a month at the Uffizi and the Accademia in Florence. However I don't think I'll tramp through the miles and miles of the Vatican Museum again with the footsore thundering herd. The whole time I kept thinking of Dorothy Parker's comment after going to the house warming party at William Randolph Hearst's mansion. "It shows what God could have done, if He had money."
I visited my college room mate in Munich. We had a blast. Among the things we discussed was our absolute fearlessness in youth--Tom was a successful Gran Turismo racer in a factory Porsche-- and whether it had been a virtue, or just stupidity.
I mentioned the Strauss concert at the Nymphenburg Palace in an earlier post. When we decided to go, I asked Tom whether we were appropriately dressed. Tom has always cultivated a distinctive appearance. With age it has veered toward eccentricity. An Einsteinian mane of gray hair, a full beard, a colorful shirt over an imposing beer belly, nondescript trousers held up by clashing suspenders. It was some time before I realized that the random pattern of on his handmade shoes was not some exotic fashion, just patches where they were worn.
I had on a brown herringbone sport jacket that looked well lived in after weeks of travel, a thoroughly crushed pink dress shirt, khaki trousers and shoes that were a bit dusty. Tom assured me that we were dressed perfectly well.
We rolled up to the palace in Tom's Lamborghini and turned it over to the valet. Inside, the prosperous middle class Muencheners had on nice suits and ties, crisply starched shirts, well polished shoes, nice little dresses with high heels and an occasional modest string of pearls.
We were treated with extraordinary courtesy at the ticket table and by the ushers. After we were seated I muttered to Tom that they couldn't possibly have seen the car.
"Oh," he said, "I think we were mistaken for Bavarian nobility. But if they had looked a little closer they would have seen that our teeth aren't bad enough."
I went for a week to the wilds of Norfolk in England where my family lived before coming to America.  I photographed the 14th century paintings of the saints on the rood screen of the church that my ancestor paid for, and the tombs of my distinguished forebears. (Steele in The Spectator: "He boasted such a lengthened succession of distinguished forebears, that they trod the Earth before the appearance of the first man.") I'm doing a book for my parents' 23 descendants with photos we inherited from my mother, so I thought the saints would look nice in it. I hope the daguerrotypes will scan OK.
While I was in Spain I visited a Foro Flamenco member and his wife who were vacationing in the tiny village of Ferreirola in the Alpujarras south of Granada. I rented a car in Granada and did the drive through spectacular mountain scenery. The village is literally at the end of the road. After boring them throughout a long lunch at a local inn, they said I should be sure to write all that stuff down. I told them I was too busy to do it now, and by the time I got around to it, I would probably be so old and stove up I wouldn't remember anything.
After Christmas we're headed to Thailand. Again, Larisa has to be back at work after a couple of weeks, but I plan to stay at least until the end of January. I have a friend who is a master electrician. He is working on a U.S. Embassy construction project in Vientiane. He was one of my regular dive buddies at Kwajalein. I've been to Luang Prabang, but not to the Laotian capital. I figure Steve can show me around.
Now that Burma/Myanmar seems to consider joining the civilized world, I might head to Mandalay, and onward to Pagan. I've alway been interested in the ruins of ancient civilizations. So far Angkor tops the list for spectacular architecture and extent, but Pagan looks pretty big and interesting.
In the spring, there's Holy Week in Seville, followed by a weeklong get together of flamenco fans at a village south of Granada. There will be guitar lessons, opportunities to learn to accompany singing and dancing, lecturesby flamencologists and a luthier, food and wine.
Wanderlust seems to be a chronic condition. I'm burning up my frequent flier miles.
Time to keep working through the 851 page book about my new camera, practice a couple of pieces for the flamenco deal, and go for a walk to break in my new shoes.
RNJ
That's what I mean, THAT'S an interesting life!

Andrew
Alan Turing
2012-12-01 22:33:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by Andrew Schulman
Post by Richard Jernigan
Hey, Andrew--
Congratulations on the concert--great news. Also great news on the book
project. Let us know when it hits the street. You'll get big sales from
the millions of RMCG enthusiasts! Or at least dozens...when we saw you
at Alouette I think you had more obvious fans there than there are
regular posters here.
Thank you, Richard. I've said it before and I'll say it again, you
absolutely should collect the stories you've written here and
elsewhere and publish them. You have a lot of great material from a
lifetime of traveling with the guitar as your passport.
By the way, I'm off to a very good start with my new steady gig,
another bistro, Picnic, a few blocks from where Alouette was. Next
time you both are back in NY on a Friday night drop by, the chef is
superb.
Andrew
Sorry is the bistro called Picnic?
--
-AlanTuring
Andrew Schulman
2012-12-04 05:57:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by Alan Turing
Sorry is the bistro called Picnic?
Yes.

Andrew
Alphonsus Jr.
2012-12-01 21:51:59 UTC
Permalink
Andrew, your story is most inspiring and interesting. May your recovery continue and your book sell big!
Andrew Schulman
2012-12-01 23:14:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by Alphonsus Jr.
Andrew, your story is most inspiring and interesting. May your recovery continue and your book sell big!
Thank you, Alphonsus Jr.!
Mental Handle
2012-12-01 23:43:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by Andrew Schulman
Post by Alphonsus Jr.
Andrew, your story is most inspiring and interesting. May your recovery continue and your book sell big!
Thank you, Alphonsus Jr.!
Hey Andrew - I'd like to hear something you played and I hope this is ok.

Unfortunately is there next to nothing found by Google and with Youtube.

Thatswhy I think you do not have gotten an Andrew Schulman website - do you?

So would you be kind to please to list sample(s) link of your own, if there?

Please excuse myfault in finding it, if so.

Thank you.

--

Andrew Schulman
2012-12-02 01:00:38 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mental Handle
Hey Andrew - I'd like to hear something you played and I hope this is ok.
Unfortunately is there next to nothing found by Google and with Youtube.
You can find links here:

http://www.abacaproductions.com/

Andrew
Mental Handle
2012-12-02 01:08:22 UTC
Permalink
Post by Andrew Schulman
Post by Mental Handle
Hey Andrew - I'd like to hear something you played and I hope this is ok.
Unfortunately is there next to nothing found by Google and with Youtube.
http://www.abacaproductions.com/
Andrew
I find none...
Andrew Schulman
2012-12-02 05:33:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mental Handle
Post by Andrew Schulman
Post by Mental Handle
Hey Andrew - I'd like to hear something you played and I hope this is ok.
Unfortunately is there next to nothing found by Google and with Youtube.
http://www.abacaproductions.com/
Andrew
I find none...
On the right hand side of my index page, links are in blue. Scroll
down and you will see the YouTube logo for that page.

Andrew
Mental Handle
2012-12-02 08:14:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by Andrew Schulman
Post by Mental Handle
Post by Andrew Schulman
Post by Mental Handle
Hey Andrew - I'd like to hear something you played and I hope this is ok.
Unfortunately is there next to nothing found by Google and with Youtube.
http://www.abacaproductions.com/
Andrew
I find none...
On the right hand side of my index page, links are in blue. Scroll
down and you will see the YouTube logo for that page.
Andrew
Ok, really there is one:


Thx.

--
Guitar Etude - All Major and Minor Triads (strict counterpoint):

JPD
2012-12-02 12:44:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mental Handle
Post by Andrew Schulman
Post by Alphonsus Jr.
Andrew, your story is most inspiring and interesting. May your recovery continue and your book sell big!
Thank you, Alphonsus Jr.!
Hey Andrew - I'd like to hear something you played and I hope this is ok.
Unfortunately is there next to nothing found by Google and with Youtube.
Thatswhy I think you do not have gotten an Andrew Schulman website - do you?
So would you be kind to please to list sample(s) link of your own, if there?
Please excuse myfault in finding it, if so.
Thank you.
http://youtu.be/uvJN_1M2aZE
http://www.youtube.com/user/adeadgbe#p/u

I'd start with the Joplin.. :-)
Andrew Schulman
2012-12-08 05:41:21 UTC
Permalink
I hate to hijack my own thread after it's already been hijacked in
several different directions, but since it was originally started in
part to promote a new steady gig I'm doing I'll jump back in.

The new steady is at Picnic, as in the subject heading and first
post. Just did my 3rd Friday night there. Lucked out again, the
previous one was at Alouette, a great place to play, a few blocks away
from Picnic, and where I live. Was there just over 2 years until last
August when they closed.

Picnic has been around for a while, 8 years in this location. Like
Alouette, it's a Mom and Pop shop; Jean Luc Kieffer and his wife
Jennifer. Jean Luc is the chef. We discovered a connection last
Friday night. My first big time steady gig was at Windows On The
World/The Cellar In The Sky; I was there 5 nights/week in 1977-78.
Jean Luc was the chef at the Cellar from 1989-92.

There may be a better neighborhood somewhere in the world to have a
classical guitar steady gig then the Upper West Side in New York but I
doubt it. I was hoping to get another one up here and lucky for me
Jean Luc and Jennifer decided to give it a try. Looks like this one
may last a good while, everyone's happy with how it's going, unless of
course that Mayan prediction comes true but even then I've got two
more Fridays.

Anyway, I'm posting in this thread again for two reasons, and above is
the first. The second reason is that I'm kind of hoping this thread
hits at least 300. Or if everyone who's a registered RMCGer posts at
least once it could go well over a 1000.

Thanks in advance. (If you don't want to post you could at least have
dinner on a Friday night at Picnic and I'll play your favorite piece
if I know it.)

Andrew
Fadosolrélamisi
2012-12-08 06:06:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by Andrew Schulman
I hate to hijack my own thread after it's already been hijacked in
several different directions, but since it was originally started in
part to promote a new steady gig I'm doing I'll jump back in.
The new steady is at Picnic, as in the subject heading and first
post. Just did my 3rd Friday night there. Lucked out again, the
previous one was at Alouette, a great place to play, a few blocks away
from Picnic, and where I live. Was there just over 2 years until last
August when they closed.
Picnic has been around for a while, 8 years in this location. Like
Alouette, it's a Mom and Pop shop; Jean Luc Kieffer and his wife
Jennifer. Jean Luc is the chef. We discovered a connection last
Friday night. My first big time steady gig was at Windows On The
World/The Cellar In The Sky; I was there 5 nights/week in 1977-78.
Jean Luc was the chef at the Cellar from 1989-92.
There may be a better neighborhood somewhere in the world to have a
classical guitar steady gig then the Upper West Side in New York but I
doubt it. I was hoping to get another one up here and lucky for me
Jean Luc and Jennifer decided to give it a try. Looks like this one
may last a good while, everyone's happy with how it's going, unless of
course that Mayan prediction comes true but even then I've got two
more Fridays.
Anyway, I'm posting in this thread again for two reasons, and above is
the first. The second reason is that I'm kind of hoping this thread
hits at least 300. Or if everyone who's a registered RMCGer posts at
least once it could go well over a 1000.
Thanks in advance. (If you don't want to post you could at least have
dinner on a Friday night at Picnic and I'll play your favorite piece
if I know it.)
Andrew
I for one has observed and liked the way it (this thread) climb and keep climbing, slowly but surely, up to the impressive count of 85, and I hope that it will keep going as this is the kind of the middle way thread so many yearned for in this fore ever wheel turning rmcg!
Andrew Schulman
2012-12-08 17:56:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by Fadosolrélamisi
I for one has observed and liked the way it (this thread) climb and keep climbing, slowly but surely,
up to the impressive count of 85, and I hope that it will keep going as this is the kind of the middle
way thread so many yearned for in this fore ever wheel turning rmcg!
Alain, thanks for your assistance!

Andrew
Slogoin
2012-12-08 14:09:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by Andrew Schulman
There may be a better neighborhood somewhere in the world to have a
classical guitar steady gig then the Upper West Side in New York but I
doubt it.
Not for me. YMMV
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