Discussion:
Three Sonatas for Guitar
(too old to reply)
Angelo Gilardino
2003-09-24 05:28:03 UTC
Permalink
Last Spring, I wrote a Sonata in three movements for Guitar with the title
of a beatiful photograph by John Wasak (a serious New York artist). The
piece, whose movements are entitled: 1) Trees 2) Heavens 3) Waters, has been
delivered at the beginning of this Summer to its dedicatee, the guitarist
David Leisner. With his permission, I report here his comments:

"The piece is so beautifully written for the instrument. I would think that
it would fit anyone's left hand like a glove, perfectly natural and smooth.
It will be, I believe, a difficult piece for most audiences, especially the
first and, to a lesser extent, the last movement. The harmonic language is
rather grey and forbidding, and the overall emotional atmosphere is austere
(I really like this austerity!). But melody is everywhere, and if the
interpreter brings this out always, I think it will communicate... [I was
of course very pleased with David's response about the atmosphere of the
music, because of its affinity with John Wasak's image].

...The first movement, Trees, reminds me a bit of Ocram in its passion, but
now far more controlled and always in the service of its sophisticated form.

The 2nd mvmt., Heavens, is heartbreakingly beautiful. It is unsentimental
and very touching..." etc. etc.

David will premiere the piece during 2004 concert season. Subsequently,
Edizioni Musicali Bèrben will publish the music with his fingering and
dynamic-expression marks (he has suggested to change them and I will of
course accept).

This was the second of three Sonatas which I aimed to write for guitar solo
after more than ten years of dedication to compose concertos with orchestra
and chamber music with guitar. The first of these Sonatas, entitled
"Sonatine des fleurs et des oiseaux", has been written for and dedicated to
the young, outstanding Italian guitarist Lorenzo Micheli, who premiered it
on last August at Lagonegro Festival. After the premiere, I asked Lorenzo to
give me a bit of time to correct some points which I had thought of too
abstractly, and whose sound did not match my expectation (a guilt of the
composer, not of the excellent interpreter). I have just delivered to him
(he leaves today Italy for one of his USA tours) the updated version, and
after his new premiere I will send it to the Bèrben print. The third Sonata
("La Casa del Faro") is in course of composition. Mark Delpriora will be
called in as a dedicatee and first performer.

On 2002 I wrote two more guitar solo works: "Triptico de las visiones", a
three movement Suite dedicated to the Spanish guitarist Gabriel Estarellas,
who will premiere them in the Madrid Auditorium on 2004, and the short (5
minutes) "Colloquio con Andrés Segovia", already in the repertoire of its
dedicatee, Frédéric Zigante, who premiered it on last March in Rome.


AG
Scott Daughtrey
2003-09-24 12:17:30 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 24 Sep 2003 07:28:03 +0200, "Angelo Gilardino"
Post by Angelo Gilardino
Last Spring, I wrote a Sonata in three movements for Guitar with the title
of a beatiful photograph by John Wasak (a serious New York artist). The
piece, whose movements are entitled: 1) Trees 2) Heavens 3) Waters, has been
delivered at the beginning of this Summer to its dedicatee, the guitarist
"The piece is so beautifully written for the instrument. I would think that
it would fit anyone's left hand like a glove, perfectly natural and smooth.
It will be, I believe, a difficult piece for most audiences, especially the
first and, to a lesser extent, the last movement. The harmonic language is
rather grey and forbidding, and the overall emotional atmosphere is austere
(I really like this austerity!). But melody is everywhere, and if the
interpreter brings this out always, I think it will communicate... [I was
of course very pleased with David's response about the atmosphere of the
music, because of its affinity with John Wasak's image].
...The first movement, Trees, reminds me a bit of Ocram in its passion, but
now far more controlled and always in the service of its sophisticated form.
The 2nd mvmt., Heavens, is heartbreakingly beautiful. It is unsentimental
and very touching..." etc. etc.
David will premiere the piece during 2004 concert season. Subsequently,
Edizioni Musicali Bèrben will publish the music with his fingering and
dynamic-expression marks (he has suggested to change them and I will of
course accept).
This was the second of three Sonatas which I aimed to write for guitar solo
after more than ten years of dedication to compose concertos with orchestra
and chamber music with guitar. The first of these Sonatas, entitled
"Sonatine des fleurs et des oiseaux", has been written for and dedicated to
the young, outstanding Italian guitarist Lorenzo Micheli, who premiered it
on last August at Lagonegro Festival. After the premiere, I asked Lorenzo to
give me a bit of time to correct some points which I had thought of too
abstractly, and whose sound did not match my expectation (a guilt of the
composer, not of the excellent interpreter). I have just delivered to him
(he leaves today Italy for one of his USA tours) the updated version, and
after his new premiere I will send it to the Bèrben print. The third Sonata
("La Casa del Faro") is in course of composition. Mark Delpriora will be
called in as a dedicatee and first performer.
On 2002 I wrote two more guitar solo works: "Triptico de las visiones", a
three movement Suite dedicated to the Spanish guitarist Gabriel Estarellas,
who will premiere them in the Madrid Auditorium on 2004, and the short (5
minutes) "Colloquio con Andrés Segovia", already in the repertoire of its
dedicatee, Frédéric Zigante, who premiered it on last March in Rome.
As always, congratulations on the hard work. Nice words from David Leisner
indeed. Mark D. must be excited to see what sits over the horizon.

One small question though - why do you not acknowledge Sonata 1 and instead
list "Sonatine des fleurs et des oiseaux" as your first Sonata?

Regards,
Scott
Angelo Gilardino
2003-09-24 13:04:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by Scott Daughtrey
One small question though - why do you not acknowledge Sonata 1 and instead
list "Sonatine des fleurs et des oiseaux" as your first Sonata?
I gave a number to the three last Sonatas only in the message I wrote to
this NG, but they will be published with their respective "literary" titles
("Sonatine des fleurs et des oiseaux", "Catskill Pond", "La Casa del Faro")
with no number. I do acknowledge my Sonata n. 1 indeed - I am so glad of
having been able to compose it, and even if it happened only during the
months I worked at building it up, I was given a power which projected
something really great on my life.

AG
Scott Daughtrey
2003-09-24 13:29:14 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 24 Sep 2003 15:04:41 +0200, "Angelo Gilardino"
Post by Scott Daughtrey
Post by Scott Daughtrey
One small question though - why do you not acknowledge Sonata 1 and
instead
Post by Scott Daughtrey
list "Sonatine des fleurs et des oiseaux" as your first Sonata?
I gave a number to the three last Sonatas only in the message I wrote to
this NG, but they will be published with their respective "literary" titles
("Sonatine des fleurs et des oiseaux", "Catskill Pond", "La Casa del Faro")
with no number. I do acknowledge my Sonata n. 1 indeed - I am so glad of
having been able to compose it,
Thank goodness! I may be equally glad to be able to play it.
Post by Scott Daughtrey
and even if it happened only during the
months I worked at building it up, I was given a power which projected
something really great on my life.
I'm happy to read this.

I would have been disappointed if you were to dismiss Sonata n. 1 as a work of
less value to your other Sonatas, even if the reception is not/has not been
what it might deserve to be.

Scott
Angelo Gilardino
2003-09-24 14:00:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by Scott Daughtrey
On Wed, 24 Sep 2003 15:04:41 +0200, "Angelo Gilardino"
Post by Angelo Gilardino
I gave a number to the three last Sonatas only in the message I wrote to
this NG, but they will be published with their respective "literary" titles
("Sonatine des fleurs et des oiseaux", "Catskill Pond", "La Casa del Faro")
with no number. I do acknowledge my Sonata n. 1 indeed - I am so glad of
having been able to compose it,
Thank goodness! I may be equally glad to be able to play it.
A performer who succeeds in presenting a work to audiences (with his
concerts and/or recordings) at the musical level requested by the work in
question, is as important as the composer who wrote it.
Post by Scott Daughtrey
I would have been disappointed if you were to dismiss Sonata n. 1 as a work of
less value to your other Sonatas, even if the reception is not/has not been
what it might deserve to be.
In the list of my directory - which can take note only of a part of what
happens to each work of mine, after its publication - the Sonata n. 1 has
been played in public concerts by Marco de Santi (first and best performer),
Giovanni Puddu, Matthias Klager, Marco Silletti, Giancarlo Dellacasa, Fabio
Fasano (the latter also broadcasted it for national radio). All of them
performed the whole piece more than once. For a piece written only 18 years
ago, it is not that bad. The Sonata n. 2 had got hundreds performances and
three recordings because it is more pleasant and lukewarm but I trust, on
the long time perspective, the Sonata n. 1 to receive all the appreciation
it deserves (no more and no less).

Thankyou for adding yourself to the list of the above mentioned performers.

AG
Mike P.
2003-09-24 16:34:30 UTC
Permalink
Cool. Congratulations to you both. To the "serious New York artist,"
is there a URL where we can see a reproduction of this photograph?

Thanks,
Mike P.
Greg M. Silverman
2003-09-24 16:36:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike P.
Cool. Congratulations to you both. To the "serious New York artist,"
is there a URL where we can see a reproduction of this photograph?
Thanks,
Mike P.
http://www.geocities.com/SoHo/Museum/6026/

gms--
Mike P.
2003-09-25 00:23:16 UTC
Permalink
Thanks Greg. Looks like "Catskill Pond" is on this page:
http://www.geocities.com/SoHo/Museum/6026/page8.html

Nice work John. Er, sorry: serious New York artist. Can we call you
sNYa for short? I like 'em all, but those b&w clouds, and the frozen
bubbles in the stream especially caught my eye. The boats in the fog
are real cool too. Yeah! Nice photos.

Mike P.
John Wasak
2003-09-25 02:59:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike P.
http://www.geocities.com/SoHo/Museum/6026/page8.html
Nice work John. Er, sorry: serious New York artist. Can we call you
sNYa for short? I like 'em all, but those b&w clouds, and the frozen
bubbles in the stream especially caught my eye. The boats in the fog
are real cool too. Yeah! Nice photos.
Mike P.
Thanks, Mike. Nice to hear you like 'em all. ;-) It is, of course,
extremely generous of AG to mention my photograph when he talks about this
particular sonata of his. I suppose when it comes to mentioning my name in
this NG, especially for a serious purpose, one does need to add "serious",
if only as a reminder that, as opposed to the usual tomfoolery I dispense in
this NG, I can, at times, be serious. (Usually right after I take off the
clown shoes! ;-) )

But all kidding aside, Angelo is a serious man and when he talks about
music, either his own or other's, he does so seriously. And when Angelo
talks about music I've found it seriously worthwhile to listen.


jw
dave payne
2003-09-25 04:05:11 UTC
Permalink
John Wasak wrote:
...
Post by John Wasak
I suppose when it comes to mentioning my name in
this NG, especially for a serious purpose, one does need to add "serious",
if only as a reminder that, as opposed to the usual tomfoolery I dispense in
this NG, I can, at times, be serious.
...

tom who? :)
Post by John Wasak
But all kidding aside, Angelo is a serious man
...

I have a sneaky suspicion that if we were reading him in italian rather
than english "serious" might not be the most fitting solitary adjective
to use here.

Dave Payne,
***@interlog.com
Angelo Gilardino
2003-09-25 06:20:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by John Wasak
Thanks, Mike. Nice to hear you like 'em all. ;-) It is, of course,
extremely generous of AG to mention my photograph when he talks about this
particular sonata of his.
No, I was not generous (not on this occasion), I was correct. I had an old
promise to fill, to write a piece for David Leisner, but I had never found
an idea about where starting from. I visited your website when it happened
we had some "literary" exchange on the NG - I saw you had quite a knowledge
of poetry - and it was obvious to give a glance to the photos shown in your
gallery. I liked all of them, but I was especially touched by "Catskill
Pond". In a few days, I connected that strong impression with my purpose of
writing a work for David, and I begun. Now the piece is done, David likes
it, I do also, and it will be premiered, recorded and published. It is not
generous to acknowledge the source of that inspiration: it would be
extremely unfair to miss doing that.
Post by John Wasak
I suppose when it comes to mentioning my name in
this NG, especially for a serious purpose, one does need to add "serious",
if only as a reminder that, as opposed to the usual tomfoolery I dispense in
this NG, I can, at times, be serious.
Exactly.


AG
John Wasak
2003-09-25 02:58:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by Angelo Gilardino
piece, whose movements are entitled: 1) Trees 2) Heavens 3) Waters, has been
delivered at the beginning of this Summer to its dedicatee, the guitarist
[snip]
Post by Angelo Gilardino
David will premiere the piece during 2004 concert season. Subsequently,
Edizioni Musicali Bèrben will publish the music with his fingering and
dynamic-expression marks (he has suggested to change them and I will of
course accept).
Congratulations, Angelo. I look forward to hearing this sonata. As well as
the 'Sonatine des fleurs et des oiseaux' and 'La Casa del Faro'.


jw
Angelo Gilardino
2003-09-25 06:26:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by John Wasak
Congratulations, Angelo. I look forward to hearing this sonata. As well as
the 'Sonatine des fleurs et des oiseaux' and 'La Casa del Faro'.
jw
I would like very much to publish these three Sonatas in one book,
including a CD with Richard Yates' emulations. His guitar sounfont is
impressive, and he knows very well how to elaborate the Finale files into
audio files. I am sure this would help a lot the understanding of the music.
Let's hope...

AG
Richard Yates
2003-09-25 13:52:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by Angelo Gilardino
Post by John Wasak
Congratulations, Angelo. I look forward to hearing this sonata.
As well as the 'Sonatine des fleurs et des oiseaux' and 'La Casa
del Faro'. jw
I would like very much to publish these three Sonatas in one book,
including a CD with Richard Yates' emulations. His guitar sounfont
is impressive, and he knows very well how to elaborate the Finale
files into audio files. I am sure this would help a lot the
understanding of the music. Let's hope...
Thank you Angelo. By the way, nearly 200 rmcg readers have listened to the
mp3 of Angelo's new solo 'Colloquio con Andrés Segovia', but none have
commented on this wonderful piece. There is a delightful balance of
adventurous (but not radical) harmonic language in a clear, contrapuntal
context that, as with so much of Angelo's music, sits quite comfortably on
the guitar. All should look forward to the publication of this piece. If you
have not heard it, the mp3 is at:

http://www.yatesguitar.com/misc/Colloquio.mp3 (4.8MB)

If you have listened to it, what do you think?

Richard
Matanya Ophee
2003-09-25 14:33:51 UTC
Permalink
Post by Richard Yates
Thank you Angelo. By the way, nearly 200 rmcg readers have listened to the
mp3 of Angelo's new solo 'Colloquio con Andrés Segovia', but none have
commented on this wonderful piece. There is a delightful balance of
adventurous (but not radical) harmonic language in a clear, contrapuntal
context that, as with so much of Angelo's music, sits quite comfort