Discussion:
"Goodbye D'Addario"
(too old to reply)
Matt Faunce
2019-10-23 17:30:25 UTC
Permalink
Yesterday afternoon I put on a new set of D'Addario Pro-Arté,
normal-tension strings. About eight hours later I checked the intonation of
strings to find the G and high-E strings very sharp! I replaced the
E-string with another D'Addario E-string, and the G-string with an Ernie
Ball. The last time I changed strings to a D'Addario set the B-string was
sharp and needed to be replaced, and I remember suffering through their
slightly-out-of-intonation strings several times before that, all within
the last year or two. After 34 years of my pretty consistent usage of their
strings, I have to say, Goodbye D'Addario.

Hello Ernie Ball, Ernesto Palla strings. I've put these sets on my guitar
only about six times in the past year and so far I'm 100% happy. If it
turns out that their strings are just as problematic as D'Addario's are
proving to be as of late, I'll at least take solace in the fact that they
cost less.
--
Matt
Gerry
2019-10-23 20:20:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by Matt Faunce
Yesterday afternoon I put on a new set of D'Addario Pro-Arté,
normal-tension strings. About eight hours later I checked the intonation of
strings to find the G and high-E strings very sharp! I replaced the
E-string with another D'Addario E-string, and the G-string with an Ernie
Ball. The last time I changed strings to a D'Addario set the B-string was
sharp and needed to be replaced, and I remember suffering through their
slightly-out-of-intonation strings several times before that, all within
the last year or two. After 34 years of my pretty consistent usage of their
strings, I have to say, Goodbye D'Addario.
Hello Ernie Ball, Ernesto Palla strings. I've put these sets on my guitar
only about six times in the past year and so far I'm 100% happy. If it
turns out that their strings are just as problematic as D'Addario's are
proving to be as of late, I'll at least take solace in the fact that they
cost less.
Though my story involves with steel strings, it may speak to their
quality control. After using the same set by D'Addario for at least 10
years, I started having problems with a (steel, wound, flat-wrapped) G.
Intonation at the 12 fret was significantly inaccurate. I changed it,
and it worked fine, but at the next string-change I had problems again
and wasted a couple of sets trying to correct it.

I complained to D'Addario and they sent me 6 or 7 G strings, and I
engaged in a long email correspondence with a product rep. He said they
had heard of no problems from others, though they had experienced
issues a few years prior, but a factory process had been corrected. I
tried all the G's, all but one sucked! They were, in fact, worse than
the problems I'd had before.

I gave up on D'Addario and moved to Thomastik-Infeld and am delighted
with their products.
Matt Faunce
2019-10-24 06:58:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by Gerry
Post by Matt Faunce
Yesterday afternoon I put on a new set of D'Addario Pro-Arté,
normal-tension strings. About eight hours later I checked the intonation of
strings to find the G and high-E strings very sharp! I replaced the
E-string with another D'Addario E-string, and the G-string with an Ernie
Ball. The last time I changed strings to a D'Addario set the B-string was
sharp and needed to be replaced, and I remember suffering through their
slightly-out-of-intonation strings several times before that, all within
the last year or two. After 34 years of my pretty consistent usage of their
strings, I have to say, Goodbye D'Addario.
Hello Ernie Ball, Ernesto Palla strings. I've put these sets on my guitar
only about six times in the past year and so far I'm 100% happy. If it
turns out that their strings are just as problematic as D'Addario's are
proving to be as of late, I'll at least take solace in the fact that they
cost less.
Though my story involves with steel strings, it may speak to their
quality control. After using the same set by D'Addario for at least 10
years, I started having problems with a (steel, wound, flat-wrapped) G.
Intonation at the 12 fret was significantly inaccurate. I changed it,
and it worked fine, but at the next string-change I had problems again
and wasted a couple of sets trying to correct it.
I complained to D'Addario and they sent me 6 or 7 G strings, and I
engaged in a long email correspondence with a product rep. He said they
had heard of no problems from others, though they had experienced
issues a few years prior, but a factory process had been corrected. I
tried all the G's, all but one sucked! They were, in fact, worse than
the problems I'd had before.
I gave up on D'Addario and moved to Thomastik-Infeld and am delighted
with their products.
Regarding the rep saying that he had heard of no problems from others, I
have no doubt that the company wanted you to think that even though it's
highly improbable that a cluster of bad luck will strike /you/, it is quite
probable that a cluster of bad luck will hit /someone/, and that someone
could be you. They knew you would still probably switch brands because of
your feelings from being hit, but they also knew that if it's on your mind
that that highly-unlucky someone could just be you that means you'll know
that you don't know for sure that they were at fault, so you'll be less
likely to advertise the problem you had with them.

I know you know of that psychological ploy; and most people know of it, but
I think it's good to put it out there in explicit terms. So there it is.

Anyway, that 5:6 or 6:7 failure ratio has me shaking my head: that ratio
would bury anyone's doubt about where the fault lay.
--
Matt
tom g
2019-10-24 11:36:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by Matt Faunce
Post by Gerry
Post by Matt Faunce
Yesterday afternoon I put on a new set of D'Addario Pro-Arté,
normal-tension strings. About eight hours later I checked the intonation of
strings to find the G and high-E strings very sharp! I replaced the
E-string with another D'Addario E-string, and the G-string with an Ernie
Ball. The last time I changed strings to a D'Addario set the B-string was
sharp and needed to be replaced, and I remember suffering through their
slightly-out-of-intonation strings several times before that, all within
the last year or two. After 34 years of my pretty consistent usage of their
strings, I have to say, Goodbye D'Addario.
Hello Ernie Ball, Ernesto Palla strings. I've put these sets on my guitar
only about six times in the past year and so far I'm 100% happy. If it
turns out that their strings are just as problematic as D'Addario's are
proving to be as of late, I'll at least take solace in the fact that they
cost less.
Though my story involves with steel strings, it may speak to their
quality control. After using the same set by D'Addario for at least 10
years, I started having problems with a (steel, wound, flat-wrapped) G.
Intonation at the 12 fret was significantly inaccurate. I changed it,
and it worked fine, but at the next string-change I had problems again
and wasted a couple of sets trying to correct it.
I complained to D'Addario and they sent me 6 or 7 G strings, and I
engaged in a long email correspondence with a product rep. He said they
had heard of no problems from others, though they had experienced
issues a few years prior, but a factory process had been corrected. I
tried all the G's, all but one sucked! They were, in fact, worse than
the problems I'd had before.
I gave up on D'Addario and moved to Thomastik-Infeld and am delighted
with their products.
Regarding the rep saying that he had heard of no problems from others, I
have no doubt that the company wanted you to think that even though it's
highly improbable that a cluster of bad luck will strike /you/, it is quite
probable that a cluster of bad luck will hit /someone/, and that someone
could be you. They knew you would still probably switch brands because of
your feelings from being hit, but they also knew that if it's on your mind
that that highly-unlucky someone could just be you that means you'll know
that you don't know for sure that they were at fault, so you'll be less
likely to advertise the problem you had with them.
I know you know of that psychological ploy; and most people know of it, but
I think it's good to put it out there in explicit terms. So there it is.
Anyway, that 5:6 or 6:7 failure ratio has me shaking my head: that ratio
would bury anyone's doubt about where the fault lay.
--
Matt
At the least you received a reply. I waited more than 2 years for a reply from a Spanish company and was only answered after the intervention of a major US distributor. Same kind of problem with the strings. I never had any problems with D'Addario but they can happen at any time and they are probably difficult to avoid. Is all nylon for guitar strings coming from very few sources? I don't blame the makers........unless they don't answer complaints.
b***@optimum.net
2019-10-25 00:39:51 UTC
Permalink
Post by Matt Faunce
Yesterday afternoon I put on a new set of D'Addario Pro-Arté,
normal-tension strings. About eight hours later I checked the intonation of
strings to find the G and high-E strings very sharp!
--
Matt
Strings have to break in. It's a basic physics thing.
D'Addario is a first rate company. If you don't like the sound or feel, that's one thing, but there are no quality issues with D'Addario strings.
s***@gmail.com
2019-10-30 17:55:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by Matt Faunce
Yesterday afternoon I put on a new set of D'Addario Pro-Arté,
normal-tension strings. About eight hours later I checked the intonation of
strings to find the G and high-E strings very sharp! I replaced the
E-string with another D'Addario E-string, and the G-string with an Ernie
Ball. The last time I changed strings to a D'Addario set the B-string was
sharp and needed to be replaced, and I remember suffering through their
slightly-out-of-intonation strings several times before that, all within
the last year or two. After 34 years of my pretty consistent usage of their
strings, I have to say, Goodbye D'Addario.
Hello Ernie Ball, Ernesto Palla strings. I've put these sets on my guitar
only about six times in the past year and so far I'm 100% happy. If it
turns out that their strings are just as problematic as D'Addario's are
proving to be as of late, I'll at least take solace in the fact that they
cost less.
--
Matt
Matt, one of my students and I have started using Ramirez strings. Expensive for guitar strings, but they really sound great. The high-tension sets have turned my cedar-topped Adalid into an absolute cannon, and the mediums sound fantastic, too. You might wish to give them a try.

-S-
Matt Faunce
2019-10-31 18:59:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by s***@gmail.com
Post by Matt Faunce
Yesterday afternoon I put on a new set of D'Addario Pro-Arté,
normal-tension strings. About eight hours later I checked the intonation of
strings to find the G and high-E strings very sharp! I replaced the
E-string with another D'Addario E-string, and the G-string with an Ernie
Ball. The last time I changed strings to a D'Addario set the B-string was
sharp and needed to be replaced, and I remember suffering through their
slightly-out-of-intonation strings several times before that, all within
the last year or two. After 34 years of my pretty consistent usage of their
strings, I have to say, Goodbye D'Addario.
Hello Ernie Ball, Ernesto Palla strings. I've put these sets on my guitar
only about six times in the past year and so far I'm 100% happy. If it
turns out that their strings are just as problematic as D'Addario's are
proving to be as of late, I'll at least take solace in the fact that they
cost less.
--
Matt
Matt, one of my students and I have started using Ramirez strings.
Expensive for guitar strings, but they really sound great. The
high-tension sets have turned my cedar-topped Adalid into an absolute
cannon, and the mediums sound fantastic, too. You might wish to give them a try.
-S-
Thanks, Steve. For the time being I'm going to stick with what I know
works. But I am curious, so hopefully sometime in the not-too-distant
future I'll try out the Ramirez strings, as well as of some other strings.
--
Matt
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