Discussion:
The Best Non-Guitar RH Drills
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Alphonsus Jr.
2012-10-02 00:57:48 UTC
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In a previous thread, it seems to be agreed that increasing strength in the rh fingers isn't necessary. We further agreed devices such as the Gripmaster or Varigrip might actually be dangerous.

Let's say then that one doesn't want to increase finger strength, but coordination. What have you found to be the best drills for this that can be done while, for example, driving?
thomas
2012-10-02 01:21:11 UTC
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Post by Alphonsus Jr.
In a previous thread, it seems to be agreed that increasing strength in the rh fingers isn't necessary. We further agreed devices such as the Gripmaster or Varigrip might actually be dangerous.
Let's say then that one doesn't want to increase finger strength, but coordination. What have you found to be the best drills for this that can be done while, for example, driving?
Since you don't have a tremolo, tap pami on your leg until you learn what a fast tremolo feels like. Then all you have to do is transfer that feeling to the guitar.

Don't do this while driving. Two hands on the wheel, you maniac!
Cactus Wren
2012-10-02 02:08:00 UTC
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IMO, coordination is based on rhythm. So, what can you do to get a rock-solid rhythm?
Post by Alphonsus Jr.
In a previous thread, it seems to be agreed that increasing strength in the rh fingers isn't necessary. We further agreed devices such as the Gripmaster or Varigrip might actually be dangerous.
Let's say then that one doesn't want to increase finger strength, but coordination. What have you found to be the best drills for this that can be done while, for example, driving?
JPD
2012-10-02 04:37:08 UTC
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Post by Alphonsus Jr.
In a previous thread, it seems to be agreed that increasing strength in the rh fingers isn't necessary. We further agreed devices such as the Gripmaster or Varigrip might actually be dangerous.
Let's say then that one doesn't want to increase finger strength, but coordination. What have you found to be the best drills for this that can be done while, for example, driving?
Not agreed. Finger strength is a great plus -- or, at the very least, finger weakness is a great negative.
David Raleigh Arnold
2012-10-02 12:18:13 UTC
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Post by Alphonsus Jr.
In a previous thread, it seems to be agreed that increasing strength in
the rh fingers isn't necessary.
I can't say that. What is certain is that the most important
thing is learning to apply what strength you already have.
Post by Alphonsus Jr.
We further agreed devices such as the
Gripmaster or Varigrip might actually be dangerous.
Let's say then that one doesn't want to increase finger strength, but
coordination. What have you found to be the best drills for this that
can be done while, for example, driving?
No way.

The best drills are DGT, on the guitar. Nothing else is close.

There may be exercises, not drills, which may be important
in preventing RH problems, but the jury is still out on
this. What may be necessary is to exercise the hand muscles
which are NOT used in playing. The muscles used in playing
are best exercised by playing. Overall strength training is
recommended in all cases anyway. Regards, daveA

DGT:
http://www.openguitar.com/dynamic.html
--
Guitar teaching materials and original music for all styles and levels.
Site: http://www.openguitar.com (()) eMail: ***@gmail.com
Contact: http://www.openguitar.com/contact.html"
Steve Freides
2012-10-02 17:58:18 UTC
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Post by Alphonsus Jr.
In a previous thread, it seems to be agreed that increasing strength
in the rh fingers isn't necessary. We further agreed devices such as
the Gripmaster or Varigrip might actually be dangerous.
Strength training is not dangerous. How _you_ strength train might be,
however.
Post by Alphonsus Jr.
Let's say then that one doesn't want to increase finger strength, but
coordination. What have you found to be the best drills for this that
can be done while, for example, driving?
The gold standard in grippers, IMHO, are the Captains of Crush from
http://www.ironmind.com - click store and look under Grip Tools. These
are fine to use while driving and I've done just that.

-S-
dsi1
2012-10-02 19:37:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by Alphonsus Jr.
In a previous thread, it seems to be agreed that increasing strength in the rh fingers isn't necessary. We further agreed devices such as the Gripmaster or Varigrip might actually be dangerous.
Let's say then that one doesn't want to increase finger strength, but coordination. What have you found to be the best drills for this that can be done while, for example, driving?
You won't get very far if you remain unfocused and ask questions and get
all kinds of advice from people that do not have the same specs for
their bodies as you. You're the only one that can ever know how to
operate your own body to it's fullest capacity. Well, I'm pretty sure
that it certainly applies to your fingers anyway. It doesn't take a
village to make a guitarist.

The hard truth is that if you want to get any good at this activity, you
have to work at it. It ain't brain surgery but it's going to take about
the same amount of time to get any good at it. My recommendation is that
you think long and hard about whether or not you really want to spend
all the time it's going to take. Your chances of getting very good at it
are not that great. OTOH, you will always reach the level of playing
that you deserve. That's fair, ain't it?

I didn't ask any questions when I started out or during that 8 year span
when I worked at it. I just put in the time and played and reached the
level that I deserved. Few things in life have as much clarity.
Alphonsus Jr.
2012-10-02 20:05:27 UTC
Permalink
We're getting some fascinating input in this thread. I thank you all, along with all future commenters.
louhern
2012-10-02 21:08:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by Alphonsus Jr.
In a previous thread, it seems to be agreed that increasing strength in the rh
fingers isn't necessary. We further agreed devices such as the Gripmaster or
Varigrip might actually be dangerous.
Let's say then that one doesn't want to increase finger strength, but
coordination. What have you found to be the best drills for this that can be
done while, for example, driving?
Music is a language, so they say. I actually believe language and music have a
common ancestor.

With that premise in mind, realize that you already have an instantaneous
connection betwenn your mind and your speech. You can think of something and
say it without warming up or working on vocal strength. You can shift from
conversational to rhythmic phrasing, at will. It all started with baby talk
before you ever spoke your first word.

So it's time to learn a little baby talk with your fingers. But since you can
already talk, let's use words to help your fingers to "talk". Every word has at
least one syllable, and in multi-syllable words one of them has an accent. So
the drill is to echo the beats in a spoken word with your fingers (of either
hand). Start with a left hand ascending spider exercise pattern, fingers 1, 2,
3, 4. You can do it on your steering wheel or on your desktop before trying it
on the guitar. Sample word, "electricity", 5 syllables: e-lec-TRI-ci-ty. The
finger tap on the accented syllable should be exagerated. Loop this
rhythmically, voice and figers in unison. The finger taps should follow strict
order, so every time the accent falls on a different finger. Repeat until
fluent!

Once you can loop a word, try this with any random phrase you read or hear.
Apply it to the motion of a hammer-on, a pull-off, a rest stroke, a strumming
pattern. . . the list goes on. Once your hands begin to confortably tap in time
with your normal speech pattern, creating rhythmic flow with your fingers will
become as simple as reciting a poem.

That being said, not everyone can recite poetry well. And when you finally
teach your hands to talk, there's no guarantee that others will think that what
you have to say is interesting or original.

Just my 2 cents.
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Alphonsus Jr.
2012-10-02 21:17:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by louhern
Post by Alphonsus Jr.
In a previous thread, it seems to be agreed that increasing strength in the rh
fingers isn't necessary. We further agreed devices such as the Gripmaster or
Varigrip might actually be dangerous.
Let's say then that one doesn't want to increase finger strength, but
coordination. What have you found to be the best drills for this that can be
done while, for example, driving?
Music is a language, so they say. I actually believe language and music have a
common ancestor.
With that premise in mind, realize that you already have an instantaneous
connection betwenn your mind and your speech. You can think of something and
say it without warming up or working on vocal strength. You can shift from
conversational to rhythmic phrasing, at will. It all started with baby talk
before you ever spoke your first word.
So it's time to learn a little baby talk with your fingers. But since you can
already talk, let's use words to help your fingers to "talk". Every word has at
least one syllable, and in multi-syllable words one of them has an accent. So
the drill is to echo the beats in a spoken word with your fingers (of either
hand). Start with a left hand ascending spider exercise pattern, fingers 1, 2,
3, 4. You can do it on your steering wheel or on your desktop before trying it
on the guitar. Sample word, "electricity", 5 syllables: e-lec-TRI-ci-ty. The
finger tap on the accented syllable should be exagerated. Loop this
rhythmically, voice and figers in unison. The finger taps should follow strict
order, so every time the accent falls on a different finger. Repeat until
fluent!
Once you can loop a word, try this with any random phrase you read or hear.
Apply it to the motion of a hammer-on, a pull-off, a rest stroke, a strumming
pattern. . . the list goes on. Once your hands begin to confortably tap in time
with your normal speech pattern, creating rhythmic flow with your fingers will
become as simple as reciting a poem.
That being said, not everyone can recite poetry well. And when you finally
teach your hands to talk, there's no guarantee that others will think that what
you have to say is interesting or original.
Just my 2 cents.
This is most interesting. Many thanks for weighing in. I'll try this.
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