Discussion:
I think the composition was inspired by the Memory of the history of the Fort, first the Romans, then the Moors(Muslim) & in 1492 by Ferdinand & Isabella who also financed Christopher Columbus in discovering America in that year.
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MOUNTIE MALCOLM
2017-03-21 00:44:58 UTC
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I've heard a couple different versions of the purported inspiration behind
RDLA.
One version says Tarrega wrote it to evoke the babbling streams which run
through the Alhambra. Another says he wrote it as a memory to a concert he
gave at a theater named the "Alhambra".
Does anyone know the REAL story?
Thanks,
Mark Westling
Andrew Schulman
2017-03-21 01:03:14 UTC
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I've heard a couple different versions of the purported inspiration behind
RDLA.
One version says Tarrega wrote it to evoke the babbling streams which run
through the Alhambra. Another says he wrote it as a memory to a concert he
gave at a theater named the "Alhambra".
Does anyone know the REAL story?
Thanks,
Mark Westling
The important thing is, how did you manage to bold the font of your post!?!

Andrew
dsi1
2017-03-21 02:22:46 UTC
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Post by Andrew Schulman
I've heard a couple different versions of the purported inspiration behind
RDLA.
One version says Tarrega wrote it to evoke the babbling streams which run
through the Alhambra. Another says he wrote it as a memory to a concert he
gave at a theater named the "Alhambra".
Does anyone know the REAL story?
Thanks,
Mark Westling
The important thing is, how did you manage to bold the font of your post!?!
Andrew
That's simple - just write your message in the subject line. :)
Andrew Schulman
2017-03-21 05:37:59 UTC
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Post by dsi1
Post by Andrew Schulman
I've heard a couple different versions of the purported inspiration behind
RDLA.
One version says Tarrega wrote it to evoke the babbling streams which run
through the Alhambra. Another says he wrote it as a memory to a concert he
gave at a theater named the "Alhambra".
Does anyone know the REAL story?
Thanks,
Mark Westling
The important thing is, how did you manage to bold the font of your post!?!
Andrew
That's simple - just write your message in the subject line. :)
David of Hawaii, I can always count on your genius for seeing the obvious, which I miss about 73% of the time.

Andrew of New York
Wishbringer
2020-09-02 03:16:05 UTC
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There are numerous comments on the tempo and pace of this piece. As I cannot know the mind of the original composer I can only form opinion by the numerous performances of this work that I've seen, and my response to such.

I perfer this work as an emotional tribute to a historic visit to a grand structure. As such, I somewhat dislike "mechanical" presentations of this work, especially those who are played at break-neck speed. If the presentation does not evoke emotion (and in many cases, bring tears to my eyes), in my humble opinion the performance has missed its potential.

I do admire those who can play this technically and flawlessly and wish I could do as well. But the performances that most touch my heart are those played at a slower pace, with pauses, emphasis, decline, staccato, and in which the artist is obviously into the emotion of the work. I have noticed in comments on various forums that people seem most impressed when the performer interprets the music rather than just playing it.

To me, whatever the intent of the original composer... this is how this piece is best presented: when one's heart is put into the piece rather than just the fingers.
Ken Blake
2020-09-02 18:49:34 UTC
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Post by Wishbringer
There are numerous comments on the tempo and pace of this piece.
What piece?
Post by Wishbringer
As I cannot know the mind of the original composer I can only form opinion by the numerous performances of this work that I've seen, and my response to such.
I perfer this work as an emotional tribute to a historic visit to a grand structure. As such, I somewhat dislike "mechanical" presentations of this work, especially those who are played at break-neck speed. If the presentation does not evoke emotion (and in many cases, bring tears to my eyes), in my humble opinion the performance has missed its potential.
I do admire those who can play this technically and flawlessly and wish I could do as well. But the performances that most touch my heart are those played at a slower pace, with pauses, emphasis, decline, staccato, and in which the artist is obviously into the emotion of the work. I have noticed in comments on various forums that people seem most impressed when the performer interprets the music rather than just playing it.
To me, whatever the intent of the original composer... this is how this piece is best presented: when one's heart is put into the piece rather than just the fingers.
--
Ken
dsi1
2020-09-03 00:32:00 UTC
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Post by Ken Blake
Post by Wishbringer
There are numerous comments on the tempo and pace of this piece.
What piece?
Post by Wishbringer
As I cannot know the mind of the original composer I can only form opinion by the numerous performances of this work that I've seen, and my response to such.
I perfer this work as an emotional tribute to a historic visit to a grand structure. As such, I somewhat dislike "mechanical" presentations of this work, especially those who are played at break-neck speed. If the presentation does not evoke emotion (and in many cases, bring tears to my eyes), in my humble opinion the performance has missed its potential.
I do admire those who can play this technically and flawlessly and wish I could do as well. But the performances that most touch my heart are those played at a slower pace, with pauses, emphasis, decline, staccato, and in which the artist is obviously into the emotion of the work. I have noticed in comments on various forums that people seem most impressed when the performer interprets the music rather than just playing it.
To me, whatever the intent of the original composer... this is how this piece is best presented: when one's heart is put into the piece rather than just the fingers.
--
Ken
That's a good question.

https://groups.google.com/d/msg/rec.music.classical.guitar/aHGDd8gmaDI/s_W_uc0q7RUJ
Steven Bornfeld
2020-09-03 17:00:41 UTC
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Post by dsi1
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Wishbringer
There are numerous comments on the tempo and pace of this piece.
What piece?
Post by Wishbringer
As I cannot know the mind of the original composer I can only form opinion by the numerous performances of this work that I've seen, and my response to such.
I perfer this work as an emotional tribute to a historic visit to a grand structure. As such, I somewhat dislike "mechanical" presentations of this work, especially those who are played at break-neck speed. If the presentation does not evoke emotion (and in many cases, bring tears to my eyes), in my humble opinion the performance has missed its potential.
I do admire those who can play this technically and flawlessly and wish I could do as well. But the performances that most touch my heart are those played at a slower pace, with pauses, emphasis, decline, staccato, and in which the artist is obviously into the emotion of the work. I have noticed in comments on various forums that people seem most impressed when the performer interprets the music rather than just playing it.
To me, whatever the intent of the original composer... this is how this piece is best presented: when one's heart is put into the piece rather than just the fingers.
--
Ken
That's a good question.
https://groups.google.com/d/msg/rec.music.classical.guitar/aHGDd8gmaDI/s_W_uc0q7RUJ
What was Angelo Gilardino's term for all the old tired warhorses?

S

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