Discussion:
Barrios Barrios Barrios! Bravo Barrios!
(too old to reply)
Jackson K. Eskew
2006-10-01 01:14:43 UTC
Permalink
As somewhat of a newcomer to the cg world, I'm now in the process of
fully discovering Barrios. I'd heard of him before and heard pieces
from him on CDs before, but the seed was really planted at the Ana
Vidovic show when she played La Catedral. O this is such a heavenly
piece, especially the Preludio (Saudade)! This is what it's all about!

I'm surprised there aren't more Barrios recordings. Segovia in
particular seems to have woefully neglected Barrios. I don't understand
this. I looked for the great John Williams Barrios CD today at Borders
but couldn't find it. I had to get these instead:

http://tinyurl.com/rvqp2

and

http://tinyurl.com/lpzjs

This wonderful classical guitar world - there's so much more to it than
I ever knew!
Larry Deack
2006-10-01 01:24:00 UTC
Permalink
Segovia in particular seems to have woefully
neglected Barrios. I don't understand this.
Check the RMCG archive for some ideas on this story. Go to groups and
type. If you don;t want to be a troll do your homework. Some people have
very string opinions and you don;t want to start flames if you are not
trolling. You should know this by now.

Segovia Barrios
John D. Rimmer
2006-10-01 01:24:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jackson K. Eskew
As somewhat of a newcomer to the cg world, I'm now in the process of
fully discovering Barrios. I'd heard of him before and heard pieces
from him on CDs before, but the seed was really planted at the Ana
Vidovic show when she played La Catedral. O this is such a heavenly
piece, especially the Preludio (Saudade)! This is what it's all about!
I'm surprised there aren't more Barrios recordings. Segovia in
particular seems to have woefully neglected Barrios. I don't understand
this. I looked for the great John Williams Barrios CD today at Borders
http://tinyurl.com/rvqp2
and
http://tinyurl.com/lpzjs
This wonderful classical guitar world - there's so much more to it than
I ever knew!
Don't forget Berta Rojas...
http://www.bertarojas.com/english/press.html

Even purtier in person.

John
wollybird
2006-10-01 02:36:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jackson K. Eskew
As somewhat of a newcomer to the cg world, I'm now in the process of
fully discovering Barrios. I'd heard of him before and heard pieces
from him on CDs before, but the seed was really planted at the Ana
Vidovic show when she played La Catedral. O this is such a heavenly
piece, especially the Preludio (Saudade)! This is what it's all about!
I'm surprised there aren't more Barrios recordings. Segovia in
particular seems to have woefully neglected Barrios. I don't understand
this. I looked for the great John Williams Barrios CD today at Borders
http://tinyurl.com/rvqp2
and
http://tinyurl.com/lpzjs
This wonderful classical guitar world - there's so much more to it than
I ever knew!
Well, if you haven't listened to his music you are in for one hell of a
treat. Segovia and Barios... Well read Six Silver Moonbeams (borrow it
if you can... as a history I don't think it's very good, but it's all
we have).
David Russell does an OK job with it. I've not heard Williams, but I
understand he did a gold standard version.
I hope this isn't a troll either.
Larry Deack
2006-10-01 03:08:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by wollybird
Well read Six Silver Moonbeams (borrow it
if you can... as a history I don't think
it's very good, but it's all we have).
I believe Richard “Rico” Stover is still alive (and may still be in
California) so the book is not "all we have".

Besides, that book is not the only "thing" we have besides living
people. Not everything is on the Internet and not everything can be
found in books or libraries.

I'm sure any teacher recommended by USC folks will have lots of
contacts for information beyond what one finds with the usual sources.
Tommy Grand
2006-10-01 03:32:43 UTC
Permalink
I believe Richard "Rico" Stover is still alive (and may still be in
California) so the book is not "all we have".
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Agustin_Barrios-Mangor%C3%A9
wollybird
2006-10-01 03:57:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tommy Grand
I believe Richard "Rico" Stover is still alive (and may still be in
California) so the book is not "all we have".
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Agustin_Barrios-Mangor%C3%A9
Most illuminating, I feel like I know him.
wollybird
2006-10-01 03:47:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by wollybird
Well read Six Silver Moonbeams (borrow it
if you can... as a history I don't think
it's very good, but it's all we have).
OK, I'll bite...
I believe Richard "Rico" Stover is still alive (and may still be in
California) so the book is not "all we have".
We also have Rico Stover (the author of the above referenced book)...
are you saying he's holding back? Does he have a seceret stash of good
Barios tales he hasn't told?
Besides, that book is not the only "thing" we have besides living
people. Not everything is on the Internet and not everything can be
found in books or libraries.
Besides books and internet where can I go Dr Deak? ( I can't go to
Paraguay or el Salvador right now). By we, I mean us average Joes who
have to work 9-5.
I'm sure any teacher recommended by USC folks will have lots of
contacts for information beyond what one finds with the usual sources.
I wish they would share... Everyone in MN clams up about him,
apparently.
Larry Deack
2006-10-01 04:11:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by wollybird
OK, I'll bite...
We also have Rico Stover (the author of the above referenced book)...
are you saying he's holding back? Does he have a seceret stash of good
Barios tales he hasn't told?
Of course! Don't you know things about people you care about that are
not for others to know?
Post by wollybird
Besides books and internet where can I go Dr Deak? ( I can't go to
Paraguay or el Salvador right now). By we, I mean us average Joes who
have to work 9-5.
As in any history there are things like the recent stuff in RMCG
about Williams and Segovia that are shared among people who don't say
everything they know in public because people are still alive who can be
hurt.
Post by wollybird
I wish they would share... Everyone
in MN clams up about him, apparently.
Just because someone lives an interesting life does not mean their
life is public domain. Some things should come out, like what some folks
knew about Foley. Other things are just not any business of the average Joe.
wollybird
2006-10-01 04:19:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by Larry Deack
Post by wollybird
OK, I'll bite...
We also have Rico Stover (the author of the above referenced book)...
are you saying he's holding back? Does he have a seceret stash of good
Barios tales he hasn't told?
Of course! Don't you know things about people you care about that are
not for others to know?
Post by wollybird
Besides books and internet where can I go Dr Deak? ( I can't go to
Paraguay or el Salvador right now). By we, I mean us average Joes who
have to work 9-5.
As in any history there are things like the recent stuff in RMCG
about Williams and Segovia that are shared among people who don't say
everything they know in public because people are still alive who can be
hurt.
Post by wollybird
I wish they would share... Everyone
in MN clams up about him, apparently.
Just because someone lives an interesting life does not mean their
life is public domain. Some things should come out, like what some folks
knew about Foley. Other things are just not any business of the average Joe.
I don't feel the need to know any intimate details. The book just
seemed very sketchy about the man...
Federico
2006-10-01 13:00:00 UTC
Permalink
There is a ton of new information about Barrios. Recent studies have
been made in Cuba and Italy. The maker of the obscure guitar given to
him by the Queen of Spain around Christmas 1935 has been discovered,
and copies of it are being made as we speak. Just last year one of the
remaining 10 missing records from his early recordings was found. Just
keep your ear to the rail.

I'd be happy to give a presentation in MN if needed.

Saludos,

-Federico
wollybird
2006-10-01 13:14:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by Federico
There is a ton of new information about Barrios.
Do you know if anyone is compiling this for us common folk?

Recent studies have
Post by Federico
been made in Cuba and Italy. The maker of the obscure guitar given to
him by the Queen of Spain around Christmas 1935 has been discovered,
and copies of it are being made as we speak. Just last year one of the
remaining 10 missing records from his early recordings was found. Just
keep your ear to the rail.
I'd be happy to give a presentation in MN if needed.
Careful what you offer! Winter is comming. They say it will be wicked
and brutal this year.
Post by Federico
Saludos,
-Federico
Federico
2006-10-02 12:31:04 UTC
Permalink
No problem, I am through there all the time, and one of my wood
suppliers is there. Tell me a date, the group, and I'll try to schedule
it.

-Federico
wollybird
2006-10-03 02:21:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by Federico
No problem, I am through there all the time, and one of my wood
suppliers is there. Tell me a date, the group, and I'll try to schedule
it.
-Federico
Well, I don't exactly have a "group" to be honest. Who's your wood
supplier in this area?
I see you have a connection to good old Sheboygan, USA. I lived there
for 20 years between 1980 and 1988. I met Bob Larsen briefly, I think.
Isn't he the guy that owned the Cobble Peg Shop?
Federico
2006-10-03 13:01:18 UTC
Permalink
I'll be happy to put on the presentation for your local guitar society,
or university classes, whatever. I do a little shopping at Youngbloods,
but they no longer handle the genuine mahogany I used to load up on. I
am always on the prowl however, they have some nice stuff once in
awhile. I also use it as an excuse to go over to Emilie's.

Robert larson was a character. WWII fighter pilot, acted on Broadway,
held 50 international patents, invented the world's first biodegradable
pesticide, and first brought carbide cutting tools to Ceylon which
created the ebony industry there. He operated Vikwood, the wood
importing business. Sold me the last 5 Brazilian rosewood logs to get
exported before the CITES ban.

Keep in touch.

-Federico
Steven Bornfeld
2006-10-01 14:57:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by Larry Deack
Post by wollybird
OK, I'll bite...
We also have Rico Stover (the author of the above referenced book)...
are you saying he's holding back? Does he have a seceret stash of good
Barios tales he hasn't told?
Of course! Don't you know things about people you care about that are
not for others to know?
I don't have any of Stover's books. I'm assuming he had access to
primary sources (specifically people who knew Barrios personally)?

Steve
Post by Larry Deack
Post by wollybird
Besides books and internet where can I go Dr Deak? ( I can't go to
Paraguay or el Salvador right now). By we, I mean us average Joes who
have to work 9-5.
As in any history there are things like the recent stuff in RMCG about
Williams and Segovia that are shared among people who don't say
everything they know in public because people are still alive who can be
hurt.
Post by wollybird
I wish they would share... Everyone
in MN clams up about him, apparently.
Just because someone lives an interesting life does not mean their
life is public domain. Some things should come out, like what some folks
knew about Foley. Other things are just not any business of the average Joe.
Larry Deack
2006-10-01 15:19:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by Steven Bornfeld
I don't have any of Stover's books.
I'm assuming he had access to
primary sources (specifically people
who knew Barrios personally)?
Sure, why not? What is a primary source? Eyewitness testimony is a joke!

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emotion_and_memory

The first thing any cultural anthropologists who does field work
learns is that people lie about the most important things. The next
thing they learn is that by observing they change what they observe.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Virtual_Ethnography
Steven Bornfeld
2006-10-01 16:00:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by Larry Deack
Post by Steven Bornfeld
I don't have any of Stover's books.
I'm assuming he had access to primary sources (specifically people
who knew Barrios personally)?
Sure, why not? What is a primary source? Eyewitness testimony is a joke!
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emotion_and_memory
The first thing any cultural anthropologists who does field work
learns is that people lie about the most important things. The next
thing they learn is that by observing they change what they observe.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Virtual_Ethnography
Forget about it then. I trust no one, not even myself.

Thanks,
Steve
Larry Deack
2006-10-01 16:23:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by Steven Bornfeld
Forget about it then. I trust no one, not even myself.
That's a good way to go.

Imagine you meet your self as you were when you were a child, then
imagine how much you would trust that self today.

What makes us think that we grow out of self delusion is just another
self delusion.
Jackson K. Eskew
2006-10-01 17:03:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by Larry Deack
Post by Steven Bornfeld
Forget about it then. I trust no one, not even myself.
That's a good way to go.
Imagine you meet your self as you were when you were a child, then
imagine how much you would trust that self today.
What makes us think that we grow out of self delusion is just another
self delusion.
You've reminded me of a passage in D's The Brother's Karamazov, from a
speech by the Elder Zosima:

"Do not lie....Above all, do not lie to yourself. A man who lies to
himself and listens to his own lie comes to a point where he does not
discern any truth either in himself or anywhere around him, and thus
falls into disrespect towards himself and others. Not respecting
anyone, he ceases to love, and having no love, he gives himself up to
passions and coarse pleasures, in order to occupy and amuse himself,
and in his vices reaches complete bestiality, and it all comes from
lying continually to others and to himself. A man who lies to himself
is often the first to take offense. It sometimes feels very good to
take offense, doesn't it? And surely he knows that no one has offended
him, and that he himself has invented the offense and told lies just
for the beauty of it.... Keep watch on your own lie and examine it
every hour, every minute."
Tashi
2006-10-02 14:58:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jackson K. Eskew
Post by Larry Deack
Post by Steven Bornfeld
Forget about it then. I trust no one, not even myself.
That's a good way to go.
Imagine you meet your self as you were when you were a child, then
imagine how much you would trust that self today.
You've reminded me of a passage in D's The Brother's Karamazov, from a
"Do not lie....Above all, do not lie to yourself. A man who lies to
himself and listens to his own lie comes to a point where he does not
discern any truth either in himself or anywhere around him, and thus
falls into disrespect towards himself and others. Not respecting
anyone, he ceases to love, and having no love, he gives himself up to
passions and coarse pleasures, in order to occupy and amuse himself,
and in his vices reaches complete bestiality, and it all comes from
lying continually to others and to himself. A man who lies to himself
is often the first to take offense. It sometimes feels very good to
take offense, doesn't it? And surely he knows that no one has offended
him, and that he himself has invented the offense and told lies just
for the beauty of it.... Keep watch on your own lie and examine it
every hour, every minute."
The blind leading the blind?
MT
Matanya Ophee
2006-10-01 17:01:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by Larry Deack
What makes us think that we grow out of self delusion is just another
self delusion.
Is this a statement or a question? If it is a statement, then it looks
like a sloganeering paraphrase from this:

http://www.stevepavlina.com/blog/2006/01/beyond-self-delusional-positive-thinking/

Again, not your own words, but something you acquired from the
Internet. If it is a question, the answer is obvious. What makes _you_
think that _you_ grow out of self delusion is Wikipedia.


Matanya Ophee
Editions Orphe'e, Inc.,
1240 Clubview Blvd. N.
Columbus, OH 43235-1226
614-846-9517
fax: 614-846-9794
http://www.editionsorphee.com
http://www.livejournal.com/users/matanya/
Larry Deack
2006-10-01 17:20:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by Matanya Ophee
Is this a statement or a question?
It started as a question then I made it a statement that still had
the ambiguity of a looking like a question. I love doing this kind of
thing with my writing.
Post by Matanya Ophee
If it is a statement, then it looks
Looks like you are on a roll in continuing to say what I write are
not my own words. Interesting gambit.
Post by Matanya Ophee
Again, not your own words, but something
you acquired from the Internet.
What's interesting about your current attacks is your underlying
assumption about my sources. I read books more than reading the Internet
but you are on to a good strategy of spinning it to make it look as
though I get all my information from reading web sites.
Post by Matanya Ophee
If it is a question, the answer is obvious. What makes _you_
think that _you_ grow out of self delusion is Wikipedia.
I never grow out of my self delusions. I am constantly amazed at the
idiocy of my thinking. I am a clown who plays a game that makes no
sense. See my big red nose and floppy shoes... I got those from rib.

As always, YMMV.
Matanya Ophee
2006-10-01 18:47:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by Larry Deack
Post by Matanya Ophee
Again, not your own words, but something
you acquired from the Internet.
What's interesting about your current attacks is your underlying
assumption about my sources. I read books more than reading the Internet
but you are on to a good strategy of spinning it to make it look as
though I get all my information from reading web sites.
I am only reacting to your postings. Perhaps if you slowed the pace
with which you post links to Wikipedia, I might reconsider.


Matanya Ophee
Editions Orphe'e, Inc.,
1240 Clubview Blvd. N.
Columbus, OH 43235-1226
614-846-9517
fax: 614-846-9794
http://www.editionsorphee.com
http://www.livejournal.com/users/matanya/
Jackson K. Eskew
2006-10-01 19:15:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by Matanya Ophee
Post by Larry Deack
Post by Matanya Ophee
Again, not your own words, but something
you acquired from the Internet.
What's interesting about your current attacks is your underlying
assumption about my sources. I read books more than reading the Internet
but you are on to a good strategy of spinning it to make it look as
though I get all my information from reading web sites.
I am only reacting to your postings. Perhaps if you slowed the pace
with which you post links to Wikipedia, I might reconsider.
Okay, that's enough. No more ugliness in this thread.
wollybird
2006-10-01 20:26:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by Matanya Ophee
Post by Larry Deack
Post by Matanya Ophee
Again, not your own words, but something
you acquired from the Internet.
What's interesting about your current attacks is your underlying
assumption about my sources. I read books more than reading the Internet
but you are on to a good strategy of spinning it to make it look as
though I get all my information from reading web sites.
I am only reacting to your postings. Perhaps if you slowed the pace
with which you post links to Wikipedia, I might reconsider.
maybe his diet

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Schmaltz
Jez
2006-10-01 15:31:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by Larry Deack
Post by wollybird
OK, I'll bite...
We also have Rico Stover (the author of the above referenced book)...
are you saying he's holding back? Does he have a seceret stash of good
Barios tales he hasn't told?
Of course! Don't you know things about people you care about that are
not for others to know?
I don't have any of Stover's books. I'm assuming he had access to primary
sources (specifically people who knew Barrios personally)?
From Stovers acknowledgements.....

"The music in this book was collected during 2 trips to Central America, in
particular El Salvador and Costa Rica. Most of the music was obtaned from
those people who knew Agustin Barrios Mangore, and space does not permit a
thorough listing of all the names of those who helped me in my work.
However, I feel a special debt of gratitude to Lois, Dwight, Rebecca and
David Stover; Dr John Marcum of Merrill Collage UCSC; Roger Emanuels;
Raymundo Barrera and family; Dr Rafael Antonio Carballo; Jose Candido
Morales; Ruben Urquillia; Rene and Cortes Andrino; Carlos Payet; Juan de
Dios Trejos and family; Julia Martinez de Rodriquez; Dr Edgar Cabezas and
family, Ron Freshman, Sila Godoy, Ronoel Simoes and the Guitar foundation of
America."

He then later he mentions...
"In addition to written manuscripts, he also left a legacy of recordings,
all made principally on the Argentine Odeon label, circa 1915-30. When
applicable the recorded version of a piece has been taken as the preferred
and final form, and many of the pieces are here presented for the first time
in this corrected form corresponding exactly to what Mangore played on his
records."
--
Jez, MBA.,
Country Dancing and Advanced Astrology, UBS.

'Realism is seductive because once you have accepted the reasonable notion
that you should base your actions on reality, you are too often led to
accept, without much questioning, someone else's version of what that
reality is. It is a crucial act of independent thinking to be skeptical of
someone else's description of reality.'-
Howard Zinn
Steven Bornfeld
2006-10-01 16:01:22 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jez
Post by Larry Deack
Post by wollybird
OK, I'll bite...
We also have Rico Stover (the author of the above referenced book)...
are you saying he's holding back? Does he have a seceret stash of good
Barios tales he hasn't told?
Of course! Don't you know things about people you care about that are
not for others to know?
I don't have any of Stover's books. I'm assuming he had access to primary
sources (specifically people who knew Barrios personally)?
From Stovers acknowledgements.....
"The music in this book was collected during 2 trips to Central America, in
particular El Salvador and Costa Rica. Most of the music was obtaned from
those people who knew Agustin Barrios Mangore, and space does not permit a
thorough listing of all the names of those who helped me in my work.
However, I feel a special debt of gratitude to Lois, Dwight, Rebecca and
David Stover; Dr John Marcum of Merrill Collage UCSC; Roger Emanuels;
Raymundo Barrera and family; Dr Rafael Antonio Carballo; Jose Candido
Morales; Ruben Urquillia; Rene and Cortes Andrino; Carlos Payet; Juan de
Dios Trejos and family; Julia Martinez de Rodriquez; Dr Edgar Cabezas and
family, Ron Freshman, Sila Godoy, Ronoel Simoes and the Guitar foundation of
America."
He then later he mentions...
"In addition to written manuscripts, he also left a legacy of recordings,
all made principally on the Argentine Odeon label, circa 1915-30. When
applicable the recorded version of a piece has been taken as the preferred
and final form, and many of the pieces are here presented for the first time
in this corrected form corresponding exactly to what Mangore played on his
records."
Thanks, Jez.

Steve
Jez
2006-10-01 10:37:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by wollybird
Well read Six Silver Moonbeams (borrow it
if you can... as a history I don't think
it's very good, but it's all we have).
I believe Richard “Rico” Stover is still alive (and may still be in
California) so the book is not "all we have".
He's alive and well indeed !

I have all his Barrios editions....a truly wonderful collection.
--
Jez, MBA.,
Country Dancing and Advanced Astrology, UBS.

'Realism is seductive because once you have accepted the reasonable notion
that you should base your actions on reality, you are too often led to
accept, without much questioning, someone else's version of what that
reality is. It is a crucial act of independent thinking to be skeptical of
someone else's description of reality.'-
Howard Zinn
Tashi
2006-10-01 23:26:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jez
Post by wollybird
Well read Six Silver Moonbeams (borrow it
if you can... as a history I don't think
it's very good, but it's all we have).
I believe Richard "Rico" Stover is still alive (and may still be in
California) so the book is not "all we have".
He's alive and well indeed !
I have all his Barrios editions....a truly wonderful collection.
Last I heard Stover, was living here in Santa Fe,NM, playing
weddings and parties.
MT
Post by Jez
--
Jez, MBA.,
Country Dancing and Advanced Astrology, UBS.
'Realism is seductive because once you have accepted the reasonable notion
that you should base your actions on reality, you are too often led to
accept, without much questioning, someone else's version of what that
reality is. It is a crucial act of independent thinking to be skeptical of
someone else's description of reality.'-
Howard Zinn
Jackson K. Eskew
2006-10-01 04:01:22 UTC
Permalink
I've not heard Williams, but I understand he did a gold standard version.
This is that JW CD, which I couldn't find today at Borders:

http://tinyurl.com/ogebe

The La Catedral snippet sounds magical.
wollybird
2006-10-01 04:08:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jackson K. Eskew
I've not heard Williams, but I understand he did a gold standard version.
http://tinyurl.com/ogebe
The La Catedral snippet sounds magical.
Yes- you'd better grab it
Jez
2006-10-02 07:22:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by wollybird
Post by Jackson K. Eskew
I've not heard Williams, but I understand he did a gold standard version.
http://tinyurl.com/ogebe
The La Catedral snippet sounds magical.
Yes- you'd better grab it
http://www.guitare-diffusion.com/2/Portraits/Lemaigre/Barrios.lasso
--
Jez, MBA.,
Country Dancing and Advanced Astrology, UBS.

'Realism is seductive because once you have accepted the reasonable notion
that you should base your actions on reality, you are too often led to
accept, without much questioning, someone else's version of what that
reality is. It is a crucial act of independent thinking to be skeptical of
someone else's description of reality.'-
Howard Zinn
news.verizon.net
2006-10-02 15:08:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jez
http://www.guitare-diffusion.com/2/Portraits/Lemaigre/Barrios.lasso
Is there anywhere to buy this "out of print" item?
Jez
2006-10-02 17:32:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by news.verizon.net
Post by Jez
http://www.guitare-diffusion.com/2/Portraits/Lemaigre/Barrios.lasso
Is there anywhere to buy this "out of print" item?
My brother picked up the 5 cds in Holland, I'll ask if they're still about.
--
Jez, MBA.,
Country Dancing and Advanced Astrology, UBS.

'Realism is seductive because once you have accepted the reasonable notion
that you should base your actions on reality, you are too often led to
accept, without much questioning, someone else's version of what that
reality is. It is a crucial act of independent thinking to be skeptical of
someone else's description of reality.'-
Howard Zinn
Jez
2006-10-03 00:01:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jez
Post by news.verizon.net
Post by Jez
http://www.guitare-diffusion.com/2/Portraits/Lemaigre/Barrios.lasso
Is there anywhere to buy this "out of print" item?
My brother picked up the 5 cds in Holland, I'll ask if they're still about.
Sadly, it seems he just got lucky and came upon the collection just by
chance.

Hmmmm.
--
Jez, MBA.,
Country Dancing and Advanced Astrology, UBS.

'Realism is seductive because once you have accepted the reasonable notion
that you should base your actions on reality, you are too often led to
accept, without much questioning, someone else's version of what that
reality is. It is a crucial act of independent thinking to be skeptical of
someone else's description of reality.'-
Howard Zinn
Theo Jacobs
2006-10-02 09:18:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jackson K. Eskew
I've not heard Williams, but I understand he did a gold standard version.
http://tinyurl.com/ogebe
The La Catedral snippet sounds magical.
IMHO John Williams' first Barrios recording is far better than the 2nd, in
playing (more subtle) but particularly in recorded sound: the 2nd is far too
reverberant and 'muddy'.
This is the first:
http://www.amazon.com/Latin-American-Guitar-Williams-guitar/dp/B0000027P9/sr=1-1/qid=1159780273/ref=sr_1_1/103-6217011-7016664?ie=UTF8&s=music

Although it's not an argument to buy it this is the recording (from '77)
that more or less started the renewed interest in Barrios.

Theo
o***@gmail.com
2006-10-02 14:16:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by Theo Jacobs
Post by Jackson K. Eskew
I've not heard Williams, but I understand he did a gold standard version.
http://tinyurl.com/ogebe
The La Catedral snippet sounds magical.
IMHO John Williams' first Barrios recording is far better than the 2nd, in
playing (more subtle) but particularly in recorded sound: the 2nd is far too
reverberant and 'muddy'.
http://www.amazon.com/Latin-American-Guitar-Williams-guitar/dp/B0000027P9/sr=1-1/qid=1159780273/ref=sr_1_1/103-6217011-7016664?ie=UTF8&s=music
Although it's not an argument to buy it this is the recording (from '77)
that more or less started the renewed interest in Barrios.
Theo
I second this opinion! the first JW's Barrios recording is better to my
ear. I have both versions. Besides the tone, the second version (In The
Jungle of Paraguay) sounded too rush on a few peices, particularly the
Maxixe and the Vals Op.8, No. 4. YMMV.
Cheers,

John
David Iwaoka
2006-10-01 06:59:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jackson K. Eskew
I'm surprised there aren't more Barrios recordings. Segovia in
particular seems to have woefully neglected Barrios. I don't understand
this. I looked for the great John Williams Barrios CD today at Borders
I took my CG lessons in the 70's and I was ignorant of Barrios (and Leo
Brouwer too - another big name today) until about 2 years ago. As far as
I know, Barrios has gained favor with guitarists sometime in the 30 or
so years since my absence from nylon string guitar.

David
Robert Crim
2006-10-01 17:15:45 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 01 Oct 2006 06:59:49 GMT, David Iwaoka
Post by David Iwaoka
Post by Jackson K. Eskew
I'm surprised there aren't more Barrios recordings. Segovia in
particular seems to have woefully neglected Barrios. I don't understand
this. I looked for the great John Williams Barrios CD today at Borders
I took my CG lessons in the 70's and I was ignorant of Barrios (and Leo
Brouwer too - another big name today) until about 2 years ago. As far as
I know, Barrios has gained favor with guitarists sometime in the 30 or
so years since my absence from nylon string guitar.
David
My first Barrios piece was a dmin waltz that I played in a series of
recitals in 1966. A friend sent me a copy published in (I think)
Argentina. It was on that kind of low quality paper that they used
down there then. He thought I would like it.

I was so taken by the piece that I made it the last one in a program
filled with the usual fare for those days.....Villa Lobos, Bach,
Albeiniz, Torroba, etc. No one knew who Barrios was at the time, but
they surely liked that piece. Charles Duncan was looking over a copy
of the program later and asked..."who is this guy?"

After that, I tried to find more of his music, but it was not
available in the US. I did get some other assorted pieces from
friends abroad. Not enough to form a real opinion of the man's full
body of music though.

Now you can google his name and come up with a ton of stuff. You
gotta love the 'net.

Please excuse this stroll down memory lane; I couldn't help it.

Robert
Larry Deack
2006-10-01 17:27:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by Robert Crim
Please excuse this stroll down memory lane; I couldn't help it.
No, it was lovely! Thank you.
David Iwaoka
2006-10-02 02:08:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by Robert Crim
My first Barrios piece was a dmin waltz that I played in a series of
recitals in 1966. A friend sent me a copy published in (I think)
Argentina. It was on that kind of low quality paper that they used
down there then. He thought I would like it.
I was so taken by the piece that I made it the last one in a program
filled with the usual fare for those days.....Villa Lobos, Bach,
Albeiniz, Torroba, etc. No one knew who Barrios was at the time, but
they surely liked that piece. Charles Duncan was looking over a copy
of the program later and asked..."who is this guy?"
After that, I tried to find more of his music, but it was not
available in the US. I did get some other assorted pieces from
friends abroad. Not enough to form a real opinion of the man's full
body of music though.
Now you can google his name and come up with a ton of stuff. You
gotta love the 'net.
Please excuse this stroll down memory lane; I couldn't help it.
Robert
My perception is that the 60's and 70's were the golden age of CG in
America, thanks for the stroll. Looks like you were witness to a new
warhorse emerging - a rare thing - sort of like seeing an exploding star
in the sky. Please excuse my being kinda corny. I don't know if Barrios
will be among those other guys you mentioned in the future - kinda looks
like he may but who knows? OTOH, La Cathedral is quickly becoming one of
those pieces that I can't bear to listen to - a repetitious piece that
is played by too many people. Maybe a young dish in a red dress playing
it well might change my mind. Naaah! OTOH, I find Julia Florida
beautiful beyond words.

David
Jez
2006-10-01 10:33:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jackson K. Eskew
As somewhat of a newcomer to the cg world, I'm now in the process of
fully discovering Barrios. I'd heard of him before and heard pieces
from him on CDs before, but the seed was really planted at the Ana
Vidovic show when she played La Catedral. O this is such a heavenly
piece, especially the Preludio (Saudade)! This is what it's all about!
Ever watch my drunken version of part 3 ?

http://www.ifilm.com/ifilmdetail/2756683

:)
Post by Jackson K. Eskew
I'm surprised there aren't more Barrios recordings. Segovia in
particular seems to have woefully neglected Barrios. I don't understand
this. I looked for the great John Williams Barrios CD today at Borders
http://tinyurl.com/rvqp2
and
http://tinyurl.com/lpzjs
This wonderful classical guitar world - there's so much more to it than
I ever knew!
Glad to hear you've discovered Barrios !!
Some scores can be found here if your interested.....

http://gallarda.narod.ru/ie_b.htm

The server can be a bit iffy, but they arrive eventually !
--
Jez, MBA.,
Country Dancing and Advanced Astrology, UBS.

'Realism is seductive because once you have accepted the reasonable notion
that you should base your actions on reality, you are too often led to
accept, without much questioning, someone else's version of what that
reality is. It is a crucial act of independent thinking to be skeptical of
someone else's description of reality.'-
Howard Zinn
Jez
2006-10-02 08:23:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jez
Post by Jackson K. Eskew
As somewhat of a newcomer to the cg world, I'm now in the process of
fully discovering Barrios. I'd heard of him before and heard pieces
from him on CDs before, but the seed was really planted at the Ana
Vidovic show when she played La Catedral. O this is such a heavenly
piece, especially the Preludio (Saudade)! This is what it's all about!
Ever watch my drunken version of part 3 ?
http://www.ifilm.com/ifilmdetail/2756683
:)
Guess that a no then !

LOL !!!
Fucking poseur.
--
Jez, MBA.,
Country Dancing and Advanced Astrology, UBS.

'Realism is seductive because once you have accepted the reasonable notion
that you should base your actions on reality, you are too often led to
accept, without much questioning, someone else's version of what that
reality is. It is a crucial act of independent thinking to be skeptical of
someone else's description of reality.'-
Howard Zinn
news.verizon.net
2006-10-01 22:39:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jackson K. Eskew
As somewhat of a newcomer to the cg world, I'm now in the process of
fully discovering Barrios. I'd heard of him before and heard pieces
from him on CDs before, but the seed was really planted at the Ana
Vidovic show when she played La Catedral. O this is such a heavenly
piece, especially the Preludio (Saudade)! This is what it's all about!
I'm surprised there aren't more Barrios recordings. Segovia in
particular seems to have woefully neglected Barrios. I don't understand
this. I looked for the great John Williams Barrios CD today at Borders
http://tinyurl.com/rvqp2
and
http://tinyurl.com/lpzjs
This wonderful classical guitar world - there's so much more to it than
I ever knew!
I like the two Naxos Barrios discs--Goni's in particular.
--Brian
Richard Jernigan
2006-10-02 02:33:36 UTC
Permalink
I haven't heard the Antigoni Goni recordings, but I have all the rest
mentioned here, and a few others as well. While John Williams shows
immaculate technique as usual, there is another who is Williams' equal
in technique but far more musical to my ear. Unfortunately
Alexander-Sergei Ramirez' Deutsche Gramophon recording "Confesion"
seems to be out of print. For me his playing raises Barrios' music to
a higher level than any other performer's.

RNJ
Jackson K. Eskew
2006-10-02 03:11:13 UTC
Permalink
Richard Jernigan wrote:
Unfortunately
Post by Richard Jernigan
Alexander-Sergei Ramirez' Deutsche Gramophon recording "Confesion"
seems to be out of print. For me his playing raises Barrios' music to
a higher level than any other performer's.
RNJ
Available new and used here:

http://tinyurl.com/jn98k
Richard Jernigan
2006-10-02 04:43:33 UTC
Permalink
Good. I recommend it to one and all---far above Williams, to my taste.

RNJ
Post by Richard Jernigan
Unfortunately
Post by Richard Jernigan
Alexander-Sergei Ramirez' Deutsche Gramophon recording "Confesion"
seems to be out of print. For me his playing raises Barrios' music to
a higher level than any other performer's.
RNJ
http://tinyurl.com/jn98k
Federico
2006-10-03 13:03:07 UTC
Permalink
Another good one is Enno Voorhoorst, also on Naxos. He has a nice
arrangement of Barrios's Variations on a theme of Tarrega, and other
seldom heard works of Mangore.

-Federico

John Philip Dimick
2006-10-02 07:52:59 UTC
Permalink
Find Baltazar Benitez playing Barrios.
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