Discussion:
Get Real
(too old to reply)
a***@yahoo.com
2017-07-13 21:38:10 UTC
Permalink
Lately I’ve been mulling the differences between great concert artists and the rest of us. What did they do over the years that most of us didn’t do. If I can pin down a few essential things and explain them well enough, then maybe some aspiring players might do better.

My goal is write some short essays—a page, maybe two. Each should be on one subject, and each should be just enough to catch someone’s attention and nudge them to think more clearly about what they’re doing.

So here’s one brief essay along those lines.

http://www.pooretom.com/getreal.html

Critical comments are welcome. In fact, I’m hoping others will find flaws I missed.

Tom Poore
South Euclid, OH
USA
Matt Faunce
2017-07-14 01:27:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by a***@yahoo.com
Lately I’ve been mulling the differences between great concert artists
and the rest of us. What did they do over the years that most of us
didn’t do. If I can pin down a few essential things and explain them well
enough, then maybe some aspiring players might do better.
My goal is write some short essays—a page, maybe two. Each should be on
one subject, and each should be just enough to catch someone’s attention
and nudge them to think more clearly about what they’re doing.
So here’s one brief essay along those lines.
http://www.pooretom.com/getreal.html
Critical comments are welcome. In fact, I’m hoping others will find flaws I missed.
Tom Poore
South Euclid, OH
USA
Sometimes while I practice I imagine playing before an audience, and it
does raise my level of alertness a little bit but nowhere near the hyper
level of actually performing before an audience. Recording, for me, is a
little better than just imagining. Open mike nights are better, and regular
volunteer playing at the hospital is even better than that, but still a far
cry from the intensity of giving a recital. (I haven't been in any of the
hyper-intense situations Andrew describes in his book.) I remember reading
about some Russian guitarist, who, for the culminating phase of her
training, played some 400-500 recitals a year at old folks homes and
factories among other places, often two in one day. That's the ideal
training, but only if certain fundamentals are taken care of before hand. I
don't think a hyper-intense setting where your fight-or-flight adrenaline
is likely to kick in would be good when learning the fundamentals, because
studies show that you're at your stupidest about 30 minutes or so after an
adrenaline rush. Although, I'm not against talking a couple hits of the
crack pipe near the end of a practice session. Anyhoo, the point of
performing everyday is so your fight-or-flight instinct doesn't kick in. If
imagining an audience or recording your practice session makes you more
mentally sharp then by all means do it, but, in my experience, practicing
in that sort of mental state is so different from performing that it's not
anywhere near adequate as a preparation for the scariness of live
performing.
--
Matt
tom g
2017-07-14 14:42:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by Matt Faunce
Post by a***@yahoo.com
Lately I’ve been mulling the differences between great concert artists
and the rest of us. What did they do over the years that most of us
didn’t do. If I can pin down a few essential things and explain them well
enough, then maybe some aspiring players might do better.
My goal is write some short essays—a page, maybe two. Each should be on
one subject, and each should be just enough to catch someone’s attention
and nudge them to think more clearly about what they’re doing.
So here’s one brief essay along those lines.
http://www.pooretom.com/getreal.html
Critical comments are welcome. In fact, I’m hoping others will find flaws I missed.
Tom Poore
South Euclid, OH
USA
Sometimes while I practice I imagine playing before an audience, and it
does raise my level of alertness a little bit but nowhere near the hyper
level of actually performing before an audience. Recording, for me, is a
little better than just imagining. Open mike nights are better, and regular
volunteer playing at the hospital is even better than that, but still a far
cry from the intensity of giving a recital. (I haven't been in any of the
hyper-intense situations Andrew describes in his book.) I remember reading
about some Russian guitarist, who, for the culminating phase of her
training, played some 400-500 recitals a year at old folks homes and
factories among other places, often two in one day. That's the ideal
training, but only if certain fundamentals are taken care of before hand. I
don't think a hyper-intense setting where your fight-or-flight adrenaline
is likely to kick in would be good when learning the fundamentals, because
studies show that you're at your stupidest about 30 minutes or so after an
adrenaline rush. Although, I'm not against talking a couple hits of the
crack pipe near the end of a practice session. Anyhoo, the point of
performing everyday is so your fight-or-flight instinct doesn't kick in. If
imagining an audience or recording your practice session makes you more
mentally sharp then by all means do it, but, in my experience, practicing
in that sort of mental state is so different from performing that it's not
anywhere near adequate as a preparation for the scariness of live
performing.
--
Matt
"Although, I'm not against talking a couple hits of the
crack pipe near the end of a practice session."

Did you intend that to be funny?
Matt Faunce
2017-07-14 15:13:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by tom g
Post by Matt Faunce
Post by a***@yahoo.com
Lately I’ve been mulling the differences between great concert artists
and the rest of us. What did they do over the years that most of us
didn’t do. If I can pin down a few essential things and explain them well
enough, then maybe some aspiring players might do better.
My goal is write some short essays—a page, maybe two. Each should be on
one subject, and each should be just enough to catch someone’s attention
and nudge them to think more clearly about what they’re doing.
So here’s one brief essay along those lines.
http://www.pooretom.com/getreal.html
Critical comments are welcome. In fact, I’m hoping others will find flaws I missed.
Tom Poore
South Euclid, OH
USA
Sometimes while I practice I imagine playing before an audience, and it
does raise my level of alertness a little bit but nowhere near the hyper
level of actually performing before an audience. Recording, for me, is a
little better than just imagining. Open mike nights are better, and regular
volunteer playing at the hospital is even better than that, but still a far
cry from the intensity of giving a recital. (I haven't been in any of the
hyper-intense situations Andrew describes in his book.) I remember reading
about some Russian guitarist, who, for the culminating phase of her
training, played some 400-500 recitals a year at old folks homes and
factories among other places, often two in one day. That's the ideal
training, but only if certain fundamentals are taken care of before hand. I
don't think a hyper-intense setting where your fight-or-flight adrenaline
is likely to kick in would be good when learning the fundamentals, because
studies show that you're at your stupidest about 30 minutes or so after an
adrenaline rush. Although, I'm not against talking a couple hits of the
crack pipe near the end of a practice session. Anyhoo, the point of
performing everyday is so your fight-or-flight instinct doesn't kick in. If
imagining an audience or recording your practice session makes you more
mentally sharp then by all means do it, but, in my experience, practicing
in that sort of mental state is so different from performing that it's not
anywhere near adequate as a preparation for the scariness of live
performing.
--
Matt
"Although, I'm not against talking a couple hits of the
crack pipe near the end of a practice session."
Did you intend that to be funny?
Sorry. That was awful. As I was writing that, I questioned if anyone would
even read that far. I do wonder if a crack high has similar effects to an
adrenaline rush, regarding it giving a boost in attention followed by a
dumb period.
--
Matt
d***@gmail.com
2017-07-14 17:17:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by Matt Faunce
Sorry. That was awful. As I was writing that, I questioned if anyone would
even read that far. I do wonder if a crack high has similar effects to an
adrenaline rush, regarding it giving a boost in attention followed by a
dumb period.
--
Matt
Without empirical evidence, you are cursed to walk through the valley of "What if I did some crack?" for eternity. Not to mention, the headline "Guitarist Smokes Crack, Climbs Tree" would be a shot in the arm for our community. Ever notice how many guitarists you DON'T see in trees? That's one area we could definitely leverage crack smoking.

For the record, I didn't read that far. Tom G's response got me back on crack-track though.
Matt Faunce
2017-07-15 07:14:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by d***@gmail.com
Post by Matt Faunce
Sorry. That was awful. As I was writing that, I questioned if anyone would
even read that far. I do wonder if a crack high has similar effects to an
adrenaline rush, regarding it giving a boost in attention followed by a
dumb period.
--
Matt
Without empirical evidence, you are cursed to walk through the valley of
"What if I did some crack?" for eternity. Not to mention, the headline
"Guitarist Smokes Crack, Climbs Tree" would be a shot in the arm for our
community. Ever notice how many guitarists you DON'T see in trees?
That's one area we could definitely leverage crack smoking.
I'm pretty sure I already saw that very headline by the Atlanta journalist
Karen Dontcare, but maybe she can do a story on RMCG. Here's a clip of
another one of her scoops.

Post by d***@gmail.com
For the record, I didn't read that far. Tom G's response got me back on
crack-track though.
I believe your plea of "temporary normality" will hold up in the rmcg court
of law.
--
Matt
d***@gmail.com
2017-07-14 17:27:58 UTC
Permalink
Out of respect for the thread, a serious response.

I like the article Tom. Personally, I use 4 perfect reps, or a multiple of 4. I practice in different rooms, and practicing with distraction can help.

If able, I try to know the venue for visualization.

Finally, regarding performance, I believe practicing performance is just as important as practicing the instrument. Sympathetic family and friends will be glad to cough and rustle papers and oooh and aaah for you. Use them!

Nice article.

gary
dsi1
2017-07-14 18:15:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by a***@yahoo.com
Lately I’ve been mulling the differences between great concert artists and the rest of us. What did they do over the years that most of us didn’t do. If I can pin down a few essential things and explain them well enough, then maybe some aspiring players might do better.
My goal is write some short essays—a page, maybe two. Each should be on one subject, and each should be just enough to catch someone’s attention and nudge them to think more clearly about what they’re doing.
So here’s one brief essay along those lines.
http://www.pooretom.com/getreal.html
Critical comments are welcome. In fact, I’m hoping others will find flaws I missed.
Tom Poore
South Euclid, OH
USA
The reality is that some great concert artist are as terrified as us regular Joes before going onstage. By "regular Joes" I don't mean me. Personally I don't feel anything when going before people.

Pretending that you're going to perform before an audience will not be an effective strategy. It's useful in the same way as having a goose that lays golden eggs is useful. Smoking crack before a performance might actually help though.
tom g
2017-07-14 19:27:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by dsi1
Post by a***@yahoo.com
Lately I’ve been mulling the differences between great concert artists and the rest of us. What did they do over the years that most of us didn’t do. If I can pin down a few essential things and explain them well enough, then maybe some aspiring players might do better.
My goal is write some short essays—a page, maybe two. Each should be on one subject, and each should be just enough to catch someone’s attention and nudge them to think more clearly about what they’re doing.
So here’s one brief essay along those lines.
http://www.pooretom.com/getreal.html
Critical comments are welcome. In fact, I’m hoping others will find flaws I missed.
Tom Poore
South Euclid, OH
USA
The reality is that some great concert artist are as terrified as us regular Joes before going onstage. By "regular Joes" I don't mean me. Personally I don't feel anything when going before people.
Pretending that you're going to perform before an audience will not be an effective strategy. It's useful in the same way as having a goose that lays golden eggs is useful. Smoking crack before a performance might actually help though.
"Smoking crack before a performance might actually help though."

Thats your advice to the kids, is it?

Many performers use beta blockers for their nerves. They are easily available with prescription.
Matt Faunce
2017-07-14 20:26:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by tom g
Post by dsi1
Post by a***@yahoo.com
Lately I’ve been mulling the differences between great concert artists
and the rest of us. What did they do over the years that most of us
didn’t do. If I can pin down a few essential things and explain them
well enough, then maybe some aspiring players might do better.
My goal is write some short essays—a page, maybe two. Each should be on
one subject, and each should be just enough to catch someone’s
attention and nudge them to think more clearly about what they’re doing.
So here’s one brief essay along those lines.
http://www.pooretom.com/getreal.html
Critical comments are welcome. In fact, I’m hoping others will find flaws I missed.
Tom Poore
South Euclid, OH
USA
The reality is that some great concert artist are as terrified as us
regular Joes before going onstage. By "regular Joes" I don't mean me.
Personally I don't feel anything when going before people.
Pretending that you're going to perform before an audience will not be
an effective strategy. It's useful in the same way as having a goose
that lays golden eggs is useful. Smoking crack before a performance
might actually help though.
"Smoking crack before a performance might actually help though."
Thats your advice to the kids, is it?
Many performers use beta blockers for their nerves. They are easily
available with prescription.
Well, the subject of this thread is "Get Real", and the song doesn't go,

"If you you wanna get down, down on the ground, beta blockers.
"She don't lie, she don't lie, she don't lie. Beta blockers."
--
Matt
dsi1
2017-07-15 00:31:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by tom g
Post by dsi1
Post by a***@yahoo.com
Lately I’ve been mulling the differences between great concert artists and the rest of us. What did they do over the years that most of us didn’t do. If I can pin down a few essential things and explain them well enough, then maybe some aspiring players might do better.
My goal is write some short essays—a page, maybe two. Each should be on one subject, and each should be just enough to catch someone’s attention and nudge them to think more clearly about what they’re doing.
So here’s one brief essay along those lines.
http://www.pooretom.com/getreal.html
Critical comments are welcome. In fact, I’m hoping others will find flaws I missed.
Tom Poore
South Euclid, OH
USA
The reality is that some great concert artist are as terrified as us regular Joes before going onstage. By "regular Joes" I don't mean me. Personally I don't feel anything when going before people.
Pretending that you're going to perform before an audience will not be an effective strategy. It's useful in the same way as having a goose that lays golden eggs is useful. Smoking crack before a performance might actually help though.
"Smoking crack before a performance might actually help though."
Thats your advice to the kids, is it?
Many performers use beta blockers for their nerves. They are easily available with prescription.
Get real! My advice is to stay away from the crack kids! There ain't no kids on rmcg anyway.

Beta blockers are useful when dealing with people with PTSD but having to play before an audience is not a valid reason to take pills. It's ironic that you recommend taking drugs to deal with real life.

My advice to kids is to learn how to play the guitar before taking up classical. It's a bad idea to learn the specific before the general, the formal before the informal.
tom g
2017-07-15 00:57:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by dsi1
Post by tom g
Post by dsi1
Post by a***@yahoo.com
Lately I’ve been mulling the differences between great concert artists and the rest of us. What did they do over the years that most of us didn’t do. If I can pin down a few essential things and explain them well enough, then maybe some aspiring players might do better.
My goal is write some short essays—a page, maybe two. Each should be on one subject, and each should be just enough to catch someone’s attention and nudge them to think more clearly about what they’re doing.
So here’s one brief essay along those lines.
http://www.pooretom.com/getreal.html
Critical comments are welcome. In fact, I’m hoping others will find flaws I missed.
Tom Poore
South Euclid, OH
USA
The reality is that some great concert artist are as terrified as us regular Joes before going onstage. By "regular Joes" I don't mean me. Personally I don't feel anything when going before people.
Pretending that you're going to perform before an audience will not be an effective strategy. It's useful in the same way as having a goose that lays golden eggs is useful. Smoking crack before a performance might actually help though.
"Smoking crack before a performance might actually help though."
Thats your advice to the kids, is it?
Many performers use beta blockers for their nerves. They are easily available with prescription.
Get real! My advice is to stay away from the crack kids! There ain't no kids on rmcg anyway.
Beta blockers are useful when dealing with people with PTSD but having to play before an audience is not a valid reason to take pills. It's ironic that you recommend taking drugs to deal with real life.
My advice to kids is to learn how to play the guitar before taking up classical. It's a bad idea to learn the specific before the general, the formal before the informal.
I think you are the person who should get real. You wrote:
"Smoking crack before a performance might actually help though."
I didnt recommend beta blockers, I stated a well known fact about their use by performers.
What you wrote is probably actionable. You need to think harder before you press send.
dsi1
2017-07-15 01:26:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by tom g
Post by dsi1
Post by tom g
Post by dsi1
Post by a***@yahoo.com
Lately I’ve been mulling the differences between great concert artists and the rest of us. What did they do over the years that most of us didn’t do. If I can pin down a few essential things and explain them well enough, then maybe some aspiring players might do better.
My goal is write some short essays—a page, maybe two. Each should be on one subject, and each should be just enough to catch someone’s attention and nudge them to think more clearly about what they’re doing.
So here’s one brief essay along those lines.
http://www.pooretom.com/getreal.html
Critical comments are welcome. In fact, I’m hoping others will find flaws I missed.
Tom Poore
South Euclid, OH
USA
The reality is that some great concert artist are as terrified as us regular Joes before going onstage. By "regular Joes" I don't mean me. Personally I don't feel anything when going before people.
Pretending that you're going to perform before an audience will not be an effective strategy. It's useful in the same way as having a goose that lays golden eggs is useful. Smoking crack before a performance might actually help though.
"Smoking crack before a performance might actually help though."
Thats your advice to the kids, is it?
Many performers use beta blockers for their nerves. They are easily available with prescription.
Get real! My advice is to stay away from the crack kids! There ain't no kids on rmcg anyway.
Beta blockers are useful when dealing with people with PTSD but having to play before an audience is not a valid reason to take pills. It's ironic that you recommend taking drugs to deal with real life.
My advice to kids is to learn how to play the guitar before taking up classical. It's a bad idea to learn the specific before the general, the formal before the informal.
"Smoking crack before a performance might actually help though."
I didnt recommend beta blockers, I stated a well known fact about their use by performers.
What you wrote is probably actionable. You need to think harder before you press send.
Good, neither of us think people should use drugs when dealing with life. I guess that makes us equal. I don't need to think harder before hitting that button. I got it all figured out even before I type a character. You might want to think harder about getting a sense of humor. :)
tom g
2017-07-15 01:43:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by dsi1
Post by tom g
Post by dsi1
Post by tom g
Post by dsi1
Post by a***@yahoo.com
Lately I’ve been mulling the differences between great concert artists and the rest of us. What did they do over the years that most of us didn’t do. If I can pin down a few essential things and explain them well enough, then maybe some aspiring players might do better.
My goal is write some short essays—a page, maybe two. Each should be on one subject, and each should be just enough to catch someone’s attention and nudge them to think more clearly about what they’re doing.
So here’s one brief essay along those lines.
http://www.pooretom.com/getreal.html
Critical comments are welcome. In fact, I’m hoping others will find flaws I missed.
Tom Poore
South Euclid, OH
USA
The reality is that some great concert artist are as terrified as us regular Joes before going onstage. By "regular Joes" I don't mean me. Personally I don't feel anything when going before people.
Pretending that you're going to perform before an audience will not be an effective strategy. It's useful in the same way as having a goose that lays golden eggs is useful. Smoking crack before a performance might actually help though.
"Smoking crack before a performance might actually help though."
Thats your advice to the kids, is it?
Many performers use beta blockers for their nerves. They are easily available with prescription.
Get real! My advice is to stay away from the crack kids! There ain't no kids on rmcg anyway.
Beta blockers are useful when dealing with people with PTSD but having to play before an audience is not a valid reason to take pills. It's ironic that you recommend taking drugs to deal with real life.
My advice to kids is to learn how to play the guitar before taking up classical. It's a bad idea to learn the specific before the general, the formal before the informal.
"Smoking crack before a performance might actually help though."
I didnt recommend beta blockers, I stated a well known fact about their use by performers.
What you wrote is probably actionable. You need to think harder before you press send.
Good, neither of us think people should use drugs when dealing with life. I guess that makes us equal. I don't need to think harder before hitting that button. I got it all figured out even before I type a character. You might want to think harder about getting a sense of humor. :)
Nothing funny about illegal drugs.
dsi1
2017-07-15 02:17:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by tom g
Post by dsi1
Post by tom g
Post by dsi1
Post by tom g
Post by dsi1
Post by a***@yahoo.com
Lately I’ve been mulling the differences between great concert artists and the rest of us. What did they do over the years that most of us didn’t do. If I can pin down a few essential things and explain them well enough, then maybe some aspiring players might do better.
My goal is write some short essays—a page, maybe two. Each should be on one subject, and each should be just enough to catch someone’s attention and nudge them to think more clearly about what they’re doing.
So here’s one brief essay along those lines.
http://www.pooretom.com/getreal.html
Critical comments are welcome. In fact, I’m hoping others will find flaws I missed.
Tom Poore
South Euclid, OH
USA
The reality is that some great concert artist are as terrified as us regular Joes before going onstage. By "regular Joes" I don't mean me. Personally I don't feel anything when going before people.
Pretending that you're going to perform before an audience will not be an effective strategy. It's useful in the same way as having a goose that lays golden eggs is useful. Smoking crack before a performance might actually help though.
"Smoking crack before a performance might actually help though."
Thats your advice to the kids, is it?
Many performers use beta blockers for their nerves. They are easily available with prescription.
Get real! My advice is to stay away from the crack kids! There ain't no kids on rmcg anyway.
Beta blockers are useful when dealing with people with PTSD but having to play before an audience is not a valid reason to take pills. It's ironic that you recommend taking drugs to deal with real life.
My advice to kids is to learn how to play the guitar before taking up classical. It's a bad idea to learn the specific before the general, the formal before the informal.
"Smoking crack before a performance might actually help though."
I didnt recommend beta blockers, I stated a well known fact about their use by performers.
What you wrote is probably actionable. You need to think harder before you press send.
Good, neither of us think people should use drugs when dealing with life. I guess that makes us equal. I don't need to think harder before hitting that button. I got it all figured out even before I type a character. You might want to think harder about getting a sense of humor. :)
Nothing funny about illegal drugs.
Really? That's funny because I just happen to have an expert on this very matter right here:


d***@gmail.com
2017-07-15 02:25:47 UTC