Discussion:
More great Bach
(too old to reply)
tom g
2016-07-05 13:12:22 UTC
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Superb!
2cts
2016-07-05 13:25:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by tom g
http://youtu.be/XMUg2bkHPTI
Superb!
Perfect!
Richard Yates
2016-07-05 14:49:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by 2cts
Post by tom g
http://youtu.be/XMUg2bkHPTI
Superb!
Perfect!
But no CDs anywhere that I can find.
JPD
2016-07-09 12:32:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by tom g
http://youtu.be/XMUg2bkHPTI
Superb!
Nice touch.
Andrew Schulman
2016-07-09 18:33:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by tom g
http://youtu.be/XMUg2bkHPTI
Superb!
Convincing and beautiful.

Andrew
Andrew Schulman
2016-07-10 01:48:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by Andrew Schulman
Post by tom g
http://youtu.be/XMUg2bkHPTI
Superb!
Convincing and beautiful.
Andrew
Furthermore: Very grateful you posted this. I've always loved this Partita, one of the relatively few pieces Bach had published in his lifetime. I'd arranged the Sarabande but never even thought about arranging the rest of the movements thinking they wouldn't work on guitar. Sudnikowicz proves otherwise. So looking forward to do the work, wouldn't have thought of is if you hadn't posted this, thanks again.

Andrew
Phlatpckr
2016-07-11 13:53:57 UTC
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This post might be inappropriate. Click to display it.
tom g
2016-07-11 14:08:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by Phlatpckr
Post by Andrew Schulman
Post by Andrew Schulman
Post by tom g
http://youtu.be/XMUg2bkHPTI
Superb!
Convincing and beautiful.
Andrew
Furthermore: Very grateful you posted this. I've always loved this
Partita, one of the relatively few pieces Bach had published in his
lifetime. I'd arranged the Sarabande but never even thought about
arranging the rest of the movements thinking they wouldn't work on
guitar. Sudnikowicz proves otherwise. So looking forward to do the
work, wouldn't have thought of is if you hadn't posted this, thanks
again.
Andrew
Yes the playing is absolutely beautiful and I just want to add what an
incredible and astounding technical achivement Sudnikowicz has achieved
here. This is probably the most difficult Bach transcription for guitar
out there (besides the Hubert Kappel one of the 6th Partita, BWV 830 in
Em) especially at the brisk tempos Sudnikowicz plays the movements, in
particular the Allemande, Courante and Gigue. The dense counterpoint
all over the neck especially in the lower register where the
simultaneous melodic lines can sound very muddy and unclear is
literally impossible to play at the required tempos with your left hand
feeling like it's going to fall off with the constant barring,
stretching, shifting and awkward fingerings.
That Sudnikowicz can do this with ease and elegance is just amazing! I
notice that he's holding the guitar at a relatively high angle, not
vertical but close; it's like he's transforming the guitar fretboard
into a keyboard with his left hand acting as soft hammers touching very
lightly with just enough tension to sound the note and then move on.
It's very dextrous playing like I've never seen before done on the
classical guitar. It sort of reminds me of Stanley Jordan's electric
tapping playing technique. It's very suited to this type of dense
keyboard music arranged on the guitar. Also notice the very smooth,
even and light RH tone he gets, just marvelous. It doesn't even sound
like a guitar most of the time, sort of like a cross between a harp and
a guitar. I should also mention that I Iove the complex and crisp
cross-trills Sudnikowicz employs here.
The Partita No.1 has been in guitarists' rep for almost 30 years now
since the middle 1980's with David Tanenbaum being the first guitarist
I heard play this and then his arr. was published by GSP Guitar Solo in
1989. About a decade later Eduardo Fernandez recorded it for Decca and
his arr. was published in 1998 by Gendai Guitar in Tokyo. Fernandez
recorded the piece with great energy and verve but unfortunately it's
marred by a very harsh and strident RH nail tone; here's the Prelude
http://youtu.be/rufYs0WB2aU
A bit later Tilman Hoppstock also recorded his version and had his arr.
published as well. His recording is excellent, he puts a capo on the
first fret so that it sounds in Eb; presumably to keep it in a flat key
as in the original Bb and possibly to make everything easier and
lighter to play. Here's some of Hoppstock's recording, unfortunately
there's a lot of heavy breathing caught by the microphone.
Prelude
http://youtu.be/n4F1_3YYomg
Allemande
http://youtu.be/DU0XCfvEso8
The only recording I've heard yet of this Partita No.1 on guitar that
matches the virtuosity of Sudnikowicz is that of the young Spanish
virtuoso Rafael Aguirre. Aguirre is a more muscular and stronger player
that Sudnikowicz; he's able to match and even exceed the fast tempos
that Sudnikowicz plays at but it overall it sounds heavier and more
guitar-like with a heavier bass sound, string whistle, and shifting
Prelude
http://youtu.be/ZcEzYiUOzEU
Allemande
http://youtu.be/IlVY-iGMTNY
Corrente
http://youtu.be/07H5VOHPlBo
Gigue
http://youtu.be/eHMUrA2cEU4
I guess it's a matter of preference between the Aguirre and
Sudnikowicz. Certainly Sudnikowicz playing is even more smoother and
legato sounding than Aguirre with very clear counterpoint lines, crisp
bass notes and almost no fret noise at all. It's just amazing what
these young players can do technically these days. This music requires
100% technical effort at all times, there's no time to rest at all.
These keyboard works are to me much more difficult that the solo lute,
violin and cello works currently transcribed for the guitar. The solo
string pieces mostly do not have the dense counterpoint that the
keyboard pieces have so you don't have to juggle so many things at
once, just concentrating on phrasing the long melodic lines with
accompanying bass notes. The hardest pieces from a technical standpoint
would be the Prelude from the 4th Lute Suite or the fugal movements
from the 1st and 2 lute suites and violin partitas but these are no
match for the technique required to play this Partita No.1 BWV 825 for
keyboard. Everytime I pick up the score to this I just give up, it's
not worth possibly hurting and even injuring my left hand for.
When I see Sudnikowicz play this on the video I can barely watch
because I know how incredibly hard it is to play this music at that
level. It completely expands the technical requirements of playing Bach
on the guitar to an unreachable standard only suited for daring young
super-virtuosos.
Thanks for noticing how extraordinary is this performance. I have listened to it many times and have put it on my iPod next to Presti-Lagoyas French Suite No 5

Andrew Schulman
2016-07-11 17:05:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by tom g
Thanks for noticing how extraordinary is this performance. I have listened to it many times and have put it on my iPod next to Presti-Lagoyas French Suite No 5 http://youtu.be/sPuaVxtz2tU
FS #5 is another one of the great pieces. When I first started working with mandolin, back in 1990, before I started my quintet, I did a mandolin-guitar-bass concert and the mandolinist and I played that piece. Haven't done it since but occasionally think about recording it with Tamara Volskaya, the mandolinist in my quintet. So you've reminded me of two great Bach pieces; thanks again.

Andrew
Andrew Schulman
2016-07-11 16:59:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by Phlatpckr
Post by Andrew Schulman
Post by Andrew Schulman
Post by tom g
http://youtu.be/XMUg2bkHPTI
Superb!
Convincing and beautiful.
Andrew
Furthermore: Very grateful you posted this. I've always loved this
Partita, one of the relatively few pieces Bach had published in his
lifetime. I'd arranged the Sarabande but never even thought about
arranging the rest of the movements thinking they wouldn't work on
guitar. Sudnikowicz proves otherwise. So looking forward to do the
work, wouldn't have thought of is if you hadn't posted this, thanks
again.
Andrew
Yes the playing is absolutely beautiful and I just want to add what an
incredible and astounding technical achivement Sudnikowicz has achieved
here. This is probably the most difficult Bach transcription for guitar
out there (besides the Hubert Kappel one of the 6th Partita, BWV 830 in
Em) especially at the brisk tempos Sudnikowicz plays the movements, in
particular the Allemande, Courante and Gigue. The dense counterpoint
all over the neck especially in the lower register where the
simultaneous melodic lines can sound very muddy and unclear is
literally impossible to play at the required tempos with your left hand
feeling like it's going to fall off with the constant barring,
stretching, shifting and awkward fingerings.
That Sudnikowicz can do this with ease and elegance is just amazing! I
notice that he's holding the guitar at a relatively high angle, not
vertical but close; it's like he's transforming the guitar fretboard
into a keyboard with his left hand acting as soft hammers touching very
lightly with just enough tension to sound the note and then move on.
It's very dextrous playing like I've never seen before done on the
classical guitar. It sort of reminds me of Stanley Jordan's electric
tapping playing technique. It's very suited to this type of dense
keyboard music arranged on the guitar. Also notice the very smooth,
even and light RH tone he gets, just marvelous. It doesn't even sound
like a guitar most of the time, sort of like a cross between a harp and
a guitar. I should also mention that I Iove the complex and crisp
cross-trills Sudnikowicz employs here.
The Partita No.1 has been in guitarists' rep for almost 30 years now
since the middle 1980's with David Tanenbaum being the first guitarist
I heard play this and then his arr. was published by GSP Guitar Solo in
1989. About a decade later Eduardo Fernandez recorded it for Decca and
his arr. was published in 1998 by Gendai Guitar in Tokyo. Fernandez
recorded the piece with great energy and verve but unfortunately it's
marred by a very harsh and strident RH nail tone; here's the Prelude
http://youtu.be/rufYs0WB2aU
A bit later Tilman Hoppstock also recorded his version and had his arr.
published as well. His recording is excellent, he puts a capo on the
first fret so that it sounds in Eb; presumably to keep it in a flat key
as in the original Bb and possibly to make everything easier and
lighter to play. Here's some of Hoppstock's recording, unfortunately
there's a lot of heavy breathing caught by the microphone.
Prelude
http://youtu.be/n4F1_3YYomg
Allemande
http://youtu.be/DU0XCfvEso8
The only recording I've heard yet of this Partita No.1 on guitar that
matches the virtuosity of Sudnikowicz is that of the young Spanish
virtuoso Rafael Aguirre. Aguirre is a more muscular and stronger player
that Sudnikowicz; he's able to match and even exceed the fast tempos
that Sudnikowicz plays at but it overall it sounds heavier and more
guitar-like with a heavier bass sound, string whistle, and shifting
Prelude
http://youtu.be/ZcEzYiUOzEU
Allemande
http://youtu.be/IlVY-iGMTNY
Corrente
http://youtu.be/07H5VOHPlBo
Gigue
http://youtu.be/eHMUrA2cEU4
I guess it's a matter of preference between the Aguirre and
Sudnikowicz. Certainly Sudnikowicz playing is even more smoother and
legato sounding than Aguirre with very clear counterpoint lines, crisp
bass notes and almost no fret noise at all. It's just amazing what
these young players can do technically these days. This music requires
100% technical effort at all times, there's no time to rest at all.
These keyboard works are to me much more difficult that the solo lute,
violin and cello works currently transcribed for the guitar. The solo
string pieces mostly do not have the dense counterpoint that the
keyboard pieces have so you don't have to juggle so many things at
once, just concentrating on phrasing the long melodic lines with
accompanying bass notes. The hardest pieces from a technical standpoint
would be the Prelude from the 4th Lute Suite or the fugal movements
from the 1st and 2 lute suites and violin partitas but these are no
match for the technique required to play this Partita No.1 BWV 825 for
keyboard. Everytime I pick up the score to this I just give up, it's
not worth possibly hurting and even injuring my left hand for.
When I see Sudnikowicz play this on the video I can barely watch
because I know how incredibly hard it is to play this music at that
level. It completely expands the technical requirements of playing Bach
on the guitar to an unreachable standard only suited for daring young
super-virtuosos.
Phlatpckr,

You are a GREAT resource here! Keep 'em coming!!

Andrew
Phlatpckr
2016-07-11 20:13:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by Andrew Schulman
Post by Phlatpckr
Post by Andrew Schulman
Post by Andrew Schulman
Post by tom g
http://youtu.be/XMUg2bkHPTI
Superb!
Convincing and beautiful.
Andrew
Furthermore: Very grateful you posted this. I've always loved this
Partita, one of the relatively few pieces Bach had published in his
lifetime. I'd arranged the Sarabande but never even thought about
arranging the rest of the movements thinking they wouldn't work on
guitar. Sudnikowicz proves otherwise. So looking forward to do the
work, wouldn't have thought of is if you hadn't posted this, thanks
again.
Andrew
Yes the playing is absolutely beautiful and I just want to add what an
incredible and astounding technical achivement Sudnikowicz has achieved
here. This is probably the most difficult Bach transcription for guitar
out there (besides the Hubert Kappel one of the 6th Partita, BWV 830 in
Em) especially at the brisk tempos Sudnikowicz plays the movements, in
particular the Allemande, Courante and Gigue. The dense counterpoint
all over the neck especially in the lower register where the
simultaneous melodic lines can sound very muddy and unclear is
literally impossible to play at the required tempos with your left hand
feeling like it's going to fall off with the constant barring,
stretching, shifting and awkward fingerings.
That Sudnikowicz can do this with ease and elegance is just amazing! I
notice that he's holding the guitar at a relatively high angle, not
vertical but close; it's like he's transforming the guitar fretboard
into a keyboard with his left hand acting as soft hammers touching very
lightly with just enough tension to sound the note and then move on.
It's very dextrous playing like I've never seen before done on the
classical guitar. It sort of reminds me of Stanley Jordan's electric
tapping playing technique. It's very suited to this type of dense
keyboard music arranged on the guitar. Also notice the very smooth,
even and light RH tone he gets, just marvelous. It doesn't even sound
like a guitar most of the time, sort of like a cross between a harp and
a guitar. I should also mention that I Iove the complex and crisp
cross-trills Sudnikowicz employs here.
The Partita No.1 has been in guitarists' rep for almost 30 years now
since the middle 1980's with David Tanenbaum being the first guitarist
I heard play this and then his arr. was published by GSP Guitar Solo in
1989. About a decade later Eduardo Fernandez recorded it for Decca and
his arr. was published in 1998 by Gendai Guitar in Tokyo. Fernandez
recorded the piece with great energy and verve but unfortunately it's
marred by a very harsh and strident RH nail tone; here's the Prelude
http://youtu.be/rufYs0WB2aU
A bit later Tilman Hoppstock also recorded his version and had his arr.
published as well. His recording is excellent, he puts a capo on the
first fret so that it sounds in Eb; presumably to keep it in a flat key
as in the original Bb and possibly to make everything easier and
lighter to play. Here's some of Hoppstock's recording, unfortunately
there's a lot of heavy breathing caught by the microphone.
Prelude
http://youtu.be/n4F1_3YYomg
Allemande
http://youtu.be/DU0XCfvEso8
The only recording I've heard yet of this Partita No.1 on guitar that
matches the virtuosity of Sudnikowicz is that of the young Spanish
virtuoso Rafael Aguirre. Aguirre is a more muscular and stronger player
that Sudnikowicz; he's able to match and even exceed the fast tempos
that Sudnikowicz plays at but it overall it sounds heavier and more
guitar-like with a heavier bass sound, string whistle, and shifting
Prelude
http://youtu.be/ZcEzYiUOzEU
Allemande
http://youtu.be/IlVY-iGMTNY
Corrente
http://youtu.be/07H5VOHPlBo
Gigue
http://youtu.be/eHMUrA2cEU4
I guess it's a matter of preference between the Aguirre and
Sudnikowicz. Certainly Sudnikowicz playing is even more smoother and
legato sounding than Aguirre with very clear counterpoint lines, crisp
bass notes and almost no fret noise at all. It's just amazing what
these young players can do technically these days. This music requires
100% technical effort at all times, there's no time to rest at all.
These keyboard works are to me much more difficult that the solo lute,
violin and cello works currently transcribed for the guitar. The solo
string pieces mostly do not have the dense counterpoint that the
keyboard pieces have so you don't have to juggle so many things at
once, just concentrating on phrasing the long melodic lines with
accompanying bass notes. The hardest pieces from a technical standpoint
would be the Prelude from the 4th Lute Suite or the fugal movements
from the 1st and 2 lute suites and violin partitas but these are no
match for the technique required to play this Partita No.1 BWV 825 for
keyboard. Everytime I pick up the score to this I just give up, it's
not worth possibly hurting and even injuring my left hand for.
When I see Sudnikowicz play this on the video I can barely watch
because I know how incredibly hard it is to play this music at that
level. It completely expands the technical requirements of playing Bach
on the guitar to an unreachable standard only suited for daring young
super-virtuosos.
Phlatpckr,
You are a GREAT resource here! Keep 'em coming!!
Andrew
Thank you, I appreciate that very much!

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